diabetes

How Diet Soda Makes You Fat

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | April 23rd, 2013 | 2 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: american journal of clinical nutrition, Americans, artificial sweeteners, bad diet, bad foods, belly fat, body weight, brain chemistry, calories, carbs, cholesterol, coca-cola, cocaine, coke, diabetes, diet, diet drinks, diet soda, eat less, exercise, fat, fat storage, fat-free, food, food addiction, food industry, fruit juices, good foods, insulin, loose weight, low-fat food, metabolism, moderation, no-calorie drinks, obese, obesity, overweight, politics, processed foods, protein, run, sick, sugar, sugary drinks, supersize, taste buds, type 2 diabetes, willpower

How do you lose weight? Substitute diet drinks for sugary drinks. Eat low-fat foods. Just eat less of the bad foods — it’s all about the calories. We are told, “Just have more willpower.”

These ideas are false. They are food- and diet-industry propaganda that makes and keeps us fat and sick. Lies by the food industry combined with bad government policy based on food industry lobbying are the major causes of our obesity and diabetes epidemic.

Now, more than 35 percent of Americans are obese, and almost 70 percent are overweight. This is not an accident but the result of careful marketing and money in politics.

We are told it is all about making better choices. If we all took more personal responsibility, we could stop this obesity and diabetes epidemic. We have been told there are no good or bad foods, that the key to weight loss is moderation. And, of course, if we all just exercised more, all of us would lose weight. These ideas hold us hostage.

8 Steps to Reversing Diabesity

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | February 16th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Green Living | tags: belly fat, cancer, chronic health conditions, dementia, depression, detox, diabesity, diabetes, diet, Dr. Mark Hyman MD, epidemic, fasting blood sugar, food, glucose, healthy-eating, heart disease, high blood pressure, insulin resistance, kidney failure, life expectancy, liver disease, metabolic syndrome, nervous system, nutrition, obesity, overweight, pre-diabetes, stress, stroke, supplements, The Blood Sugar Solution, toxins, type 2 diabetes

Diabesity

Last week I began a discussion about a modern epidemic, a deadly disease that one of every two Americans has, a disease that’s making us fat and sick. And 90 percent of those affected don’t even know they have it!

This disease is diabesity, the continuum of abnormal biology that ranges from mild insulin resistance to full-blown diabetes.

Dinner Is a Date with the Doctor: 5 Asian Superfoods

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | January 18th, 2012 | 3 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: arame, Asian superfoods, atherosclerosis, brown algae, cancer, cholesterol, daikon radish, detox, diabetes, diet, digestion, glucomannan, healthy-eating, immune system, immunity, konjac fiber, konnyaku jelly, medicine, nutrition, pharmacology, sea vegetable, shiitake mushrooms, shirataki noodles, super foods, toxins, umeboshi plums, Vitamin D, weight-loss

Shiitake mushroomsMedicine doesn’t always come in a pill. In fact, some of the most powerful medicines are delicious and can be found at your local supermarket or “farmacy.” Healing foods have been used for centuries in Asia as part of the cuisine. In fact, in Asia, food and medicine are often the same thing.

Here are five superfoods that you may never have heard of but that can be found at most Asian markets and even places like Whole Foods. Try them. You might be surprised by their unique and extraordinary good taste. And they may help you lose weight, reverse diabetes, lower cholesterol and prevent cancer.

The Not-So-Sweet Truth About High Fructose Corn Syrup

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | September 20th, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: Archer Daniels Midland, artificial sweetener, cancer, cane sugar, Cargill, corn industry, corn sugar, corn syrup, cornfield, diabetes, diet, dietary, dr. mark hyman, food industry, fructose, glucose, healthy-eating, heart disease, HFCS, high fructose corn syrup, industrial agriculture, inflammation, insulin, lipogenesis, liver failure, mercury, nutrition, obesity, parenting, sucrose, tooth decay, weight gain

High Fructose Corn SyrupIf you can’t convince them, confuse them.
— Harry Truman

The current media debate about the benefits (or lack of harm) of high fructose corn syrup in our diet misses the obvious. The average American has increased his consumption of HFCS (mostly from sugar-sweetened drinks and processed food) from zero to more than 60 pounds per year. Obesity rates have more than tripled and diabetes incidence has increased more than seven-fold. HFCS is not perhaps the only cause, but one that cannot be ignored.

Doubt and confusion are the currency of deception, and they sow the seeds of complacency. Recently, these have been used skillfully through massive print and television advertising campaigns by the Corn Refiners Association’s attempt to dispel the “myth” that HFCS is harmful and assert through the opinion of “medical and nutrition experts” that it is no different than cane sugar. It is a “natural” product that can be a healthy part of our diets when used in moderation.

Except for one problem: Even when used in moderation, it is a major cause of heart disease, obesity, cancer, dementia, liver failure, tooth decay and more.

Sugar Addiction? It Might Be Genetic

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | April 15th, 2011 | 3 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: addiction, addicts, alcohol, amino acids, appetite, artificial sweeteners, bedtime, blood sugar, breakfast, chemicals, Chromium, cravings, diabetes, diet, dopamine receptor, dr. mark hyman, drugs, eating before bed, food, food allergies, Food sensitivities, fruit juice, genes, genetics, glucomannan, glutamine, hormones, hunger, inflammation, insulin, medical research, neurotransmitters, nutrition, nutritional deficiencies, omega-3 fatty acids, pleasure, protein, refined sugar, reward centers, Rhodiola, science, sleep, small meals, soda, stress, sugar, tyrosine and 5-HTP, Vitamin D, weight-loss, willpower

Hand reaching into a cookie jarWe’re all programmed to like sugar, but new research shows that some people are genetically much more prone to sugar addiction than others.

As I noted in my previous blog on food addiction, science demonstrates that people can be biologically addicted to sugar and other foods in the same way people can be addicted to heroin, cocaine or nicotine. Bingeing and addictive behaviors are eerily similar in alcoholics and sugar addicts. In fact, many recovering alcoholics switch to another easily available drug: sugar.

The Unseen Benefits of Physical Fitness

The FIRM Master Instructor Team by The FIRM Master Instructor Team | April 8th, 2011 | 5 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging, Weight Loss | tags: aging, anxiety, benefits of physical fitness, blood pressure, body composition, bone health, cardiorespiratory fitness, cardiovascular, cholesterol, depression, diabetes, diet, exercise, Fitness, flexibility, health, heart disease, life span, longevity, metabolic syndrome, metabolism, muscular endurance, nutrition, obesity, osteoporosis, sarcopenia, the firm, uscular strength, weight-loss, working out, workout

Fitness BenefitsMost of us pursue fitness in order to look good. In this quest, we run an extra mile to lose five pounds or pick up a heavier weight to trim our arms. A balanced fitness program and sensible eating habits are powerful tools for weight loss. However, the same tools we use to look our best and lose weight are also powerful tools in maintaining the quality of our lives and our health.

What is physical fitness? Physical fitness includes five health-related components: muscular strength, muscular endurance, cardiorespiratory fitness, flexibility and body composition. The FIRM workouts are designed with these components in mind. Once you’ve begun to see results on the scale, in your jeans and with your tape measure, what are the benefits you don’t see?

What’s Missing from the New Vitamin D Recommendations?

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | January 26th, 2011 | 2 Comments
topic: Family Health, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: autoimmune disease, bone density, calcium, cancer, dairy, dark leafy greens, depression, diabetes, diet, Dietary Reference Intakes, doctor, DRIs, fibromyalgia, fish, genetics, health, heart disease, immune system, influenza, Institute of Medicine, intake, IOM, IU, medicine, milk, nutrition, physician, science, skeletal systems, studies, sun, sunlight, the flu, thyroid, Vitamin D

Vitamin D capsulesOne day, vitamin D seems like the cure for everything, and the next, we are inundated with warnings about dangers and lack of science. Confusion is rampant about the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) for Calcium and Vitamin D recently released from the Institute of Medicine.

Soy: Blessing or Curse?

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | January 17th, 2011 | 1 Comment
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: Alzheimer's Disease, beans, bone density, breast-cancer, breastfeeding, cholesterol, dairy, data, diabetes, diet, digestion, edamame, fermented, genetically engineered, GMO, health, healthy-eating, hormones, infant formula, kidneys, Mark Hyman, medical studies, menopause symptoms, milk, miso, natto, nuts, organic, probiotics, processed foods, protein, science, soy, tempeh, thyroid, tofu, vegan, vegetarian

Soy food products (tofu, soy beans, soy nuts, soy sauce, soy milk)

“Eating soy will kill you!” Scan the media reports and surf the Internet, and you’re bound to come across scary claims that would lead you to believe this is true. Some you may have heard:

• Soy will give you breast cancer.
• Soy formula is dangerous to babies.
• Genetically modified soy foods may modify you.
• Soy foods block your thyroid function.
• Soy prevents the absorption of minerals and interferes with digestion.
• Tofu causes Alzheimer’s Disease.

Why Eating a Low-Fat Diet Doesn’t Lead to Weight Loss

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | August 18th, 2010 | 2 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: aging, Alzheimer's, appetite, belly, blood sugar, calories, cancer, cholesterol, diabetes, food, genes, glucose test, glycemic load, heart disease, hormones, hunger, insulin, low-fat diet, medical study, metabolism, nutrigenomics, obesity, overweight, triglycerides, waist, weight-loss

Man on scaleDespite the common observation that obesity runs in families, genetic research shows that the habits you inherit from your family are more important than the genes you inherit. Obesity genes account for only 5 percent of all weight problems. So, we have to wonder, what causes the other 95 percent of weight problems?

The Super Fiber that Controls Your Appetite and Blood Sugar

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | July 14th, 2010 | 1 Comment
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: African bushmen, appetite, blood pressure, blood sugar, breast-cancer, cancer, cholesterol, colon cancer, constipation, Dennis Burkitt, diabetes, fiber, flax, glucomannan, heart disease, insoluble fiber, insulin, obesity, soluble fiber, weigh loss

fiber-rich fruits and grains

Imagine eating 12 pounds of food a day — and still staying thin and healthy! That may sound crazy, but it’s exactly what our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate for millennia. Of course, I wouldn’t advise anyone today to eat 12 pounds of food, because the food in our society lacks one major ingredient that our ancestors ate in nearly all their food — fiber!