de-extinction

Bringing Back Departed Species: Is De-Extinction a Good Idea?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | April 19th, 2013 | 1 Comment
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: Arabian Oryx Sanctuary, burcado, Chinese river dolphins, climate change, clone, cloning, de-extinction, dinosaurs, DNA, Eco Travel, environment, ethics, extinct, extinction, frogs, gastric brooding frog, genetics, habitat, habitat destruction, harm to wildlife, Jurassic Park, loss of habitat, natural habitats, nature, oryx, passsenger pigeon, poaching, Pyrenean ibex, reintroduction of wildlife, science, species extinction, Tasmanian tiger, technology, wildlife poaching, woolly mammoth

Frog on a leaf

The image of the woolly mammoth, saber-toothed cat and dodo bird stepping out of a beaker on the cover of National Geographic’s April issue says it all. Science has found a way to bring back some long-extinct species — or at least, facsimiles of them.

In truth, the goat-like bucardo, or Pyrenean ibex, is the only extinct animal scientists have actually revived. In 2003, biologists managed to clone an offspring from frozen skin cells from the last survivor, which died in 2000. The clone, however, lived for only a few minutes after its birth. Since then, advances in cloning technology have made it possible to bring back any species if there is a remnant of DNA.

But with so many habitat pressures on the wild species that are already here and with so many on the brink of extinction, is bringing back those we’ve already lost a good idea?