citizen science

How Far Should We Go to Rescue At-Risk Species?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | July 16th, 2010 | 8 Comments
topic: Green Living | tags: assisted migration, Australia, biodiversity, botanic gardens, butterfly, citizen activists, citizen science, climate change, dune thistle, ecology, endangered, environment, environmental activists, extinct, extinction, fauna, flora, Florida torreya, global-warming, habitat destruction, natural habitats, plants, Queensland, species extinction, Torreya Guardians, wildflower, wildlife

Horicon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge

The white lemuroid possum may soon hold a brand-new world title: First species to go extinct due to climate change.

In December 2009, scientists reported that the possum is missing from its only home in the mountain forests of northern Queensland, Australia. It hasn’t been seen there in three years. A slight temperature rise (of only 1 or 2 degrees) is likely the reason: The possum typically dies in as few as four or five hours at 86 degrees Fahrenheit.

Do You Trust “Citizen Science”?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | May 13th, 2010 | 12 Comments
topic: Conscious Living News, Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: barred owls, birds, citizen science, Cornell, environment, fish, galaxies, grasslands, greater prairie chickens, ornithology, Oxford, research, Yale

Citizen science” isn’t the study of all of us who reside in the U.S., but rather a way of collecting information that has become popular in recent years. The phrase refers to volunteers who work as field assistants for scientific studies. In a time when school and natural resources department budgets are tight, using ordinary folks to gather and record wildlife and environmental observations can stretch research dollars by getting reams of data for no cost.