China

Which Comes First: The Needs of Endangered Animals or the People Who Live with Them?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | April 14th, 2014 | 1 Comment
topic: Green Living | tags: China, conservation, Eco Travel, Endangered Species Act, endangered speices, environment, gray wolves, human treatment, International Crane Foundation, nature, species extinction, travel, Uganda, wildlife, wildlife poaching, Yellowstone National Park

Mountain gorilla

Wildlife conservation campaigns often focus on the needs of endangered species, asking you to donate money in order to save their habitats, fight poaching of them, stop illegal trade in them or build refuges for them.

But at a recent seminar at the Royal Anthropological Institute in London, Professor Catherine Hill of the city’s Oxford Brookes University suggested that such campaigns may be doomed to fail unless an added, important issue is addressed: the attitudes and feelings of the people who live in the threatened species’ ranges.

According to the results of a recent study conducted by Dr. Hill, residents of communities in Uganda felt that they were being treated as though their lives were worth less than those of the animals that surrounded them.

Can conservation efforts, then, no matter how well intended, ever succeed if the local populace feels that their needs come second?

The True Cost of the Clothes on Our Backs

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | November 25th, 2013 | 2 Comments
topic: Giving Back, Green Living | tags: apparel, Bangladesh, cheap, China, Clothing, costs more, environment, expensive, fair wage, fair-trade, fashion industry, free trade, garment factories, India, Indonesia, laborers, natural, organic, pay, sweat shop, sweatshop labor, sweatshops, thailand, women, workers

Fair Trade Clothing

I can trace my path to eco-awareness from a desire for undershirts. Baby undershirts, to be exact.

Zoos: Saviors of Threatened Species or Creators of Unnatural Ones?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | December 17th, 2012 | 6 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: africa, biodiversity, cheetahs, China, conservation, Eco Travel, elephants, endangered speices, environment, Ethiopia, extinction, genetic diversity, genetics, giant pandas, Green Living, lions, natural habitats, nature, North African Barbary lions, Smithsonian National Zoo, South African Cape lions, species extinction, Tasmanian tiger, threatened species, travel, wild animals, zoos

Lion Under Tree

A new species of lion has recently been discovered, announced the National Geographic Society a few weeks ago. Were the animals caught by camera trap or spotted by a tracker in the remote regions of Africa? No. They were found — in all places — in an Ethiopian zoo. It’s questionable whether any other representatives of this species are alive in the wild today.

All over the world, the struggle to keep endangered species from going extinct is often played out in zoos or in captive breeding centers. The last known Tasmanian tiger lived out its life in a zoo before it died in 1936, giant pandas are being bred in Chinese reserves and whooping cranes are being raised at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland.

Living in zoos or in other places of captivity, however, changes wild animals — sometimes to the point where behaviorally they little resemble their wild counterparts. But is keeping an altered, threatened wild species from going extinct better than losing it altogether?

Chill Out! 5 Winter Travel Adventures to Celebrate the Cold

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | January 25th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Eco Travel | tags: Absolut Ice Bar, alaska, Arctic Circle, aurora borealis, Canada, China, Churchill, cold weather, dog sledding, Eco Travel, eco-friendly travel, gray wolves, Greenland, Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival, ice hotel, ice sculptures, IceHotel, Japan, Manitoba, natural-habitat-adventures, northern lights, Quebec Winter Carnival, Sapporo Snow Festival, snow sculptures, Swedish Lapland, winter travel, Yellowstone National Park

Dog SledWith a few exceptions, much of the U.S. has been experiencing an unseasonably warm and dry winter. While that may make some people happy, those of us who welcome snow, sweaters, skating and skiing are missing winter’s frosty grip.

If you’re feeling as blah as the brown landscape outside, consider a mid-winter adventure to colder climes. There’s nothing like nature beauteously transformed by an icy white veneer to lift even the most listless spirit. From dog sledding to tracking wolves, sleeping in an ice hotel and watching the Northern Lights, cold-weather travel is all kinds of cool!

Eat Your Medicine: Food as Pharmacology

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | December 1st, 2011 | 8 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging, Healthy Eating | tags: Asia, China, Chinese food, chronic disease, diet, eat the rainbow, food as medicine, food colors, fruits, glucomannan, healthy-eating, konjac, medicinal foods, nutrigenomics, nutrition, pharmacology, phytonutrients, vegetables

VegetablesWhat you put at the end of your fork is more powerful medicine than anything you will find at the bottom of a pill bottle.

Food is the most powerful medicine available to heal chronic disease, which will account for more than 50 million deaths and cost the global economy $47 trillion by 2030. All you need to do is eat your medicine and think of your grocery store as your pharmacy.

Recently, I went to Asia to lecture on prevention, wellness, health, nutrition and the new field of nutrigenomics, the science of how molecules in food interact with our genes to support or interfere with our health. I came away feeling humbled and awed as I realized that the average Chinese person knows more about the medicinal properties of food than I do after years of research. Medicinal foods are part of their everyday diet, and I learned more from matter-of-fact discussions about the healing properties of food I shared with my Chinese hosts than from my hours researching medical journals.

Travel That Gives Back: This Earth Day, Plan a Voluntourism Vacation

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | April 21st, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Giving Back, Green Living | tags: africa, agriculture, Aisa, Baja Peninsula, Belize, Bifengxia Panda Center, building projects, Cape Coast, charity, China, community development, conservation, Cotton Tree Lodge, Earth Day, elephant sanctuary, endangered-species, environmental education, environmental protection, europe, GAP Adventures, GeoVisions, Ghana, giving back, Global Volunteer Network, Go Abroad, Go Eco, gray whales, green-travel, Grupo Tortuguero, i to i Volunteer & Adventure Travel, Institute for Field Research Expeditions, International Student Volunteers, international trips, kids, Lonely Planet, Magadalena Bay, mexico, NGOs, nonprofits, Organic Chocolate Farm, Panda Conservation Adventure, ProWorld, recycling, sanitation, sea turtles, service work, Sichuan province, south america, Sri Lanka, Sustainable Harvest International, teaching, volunteer vacation, volunteering, voluntourism, VolunTourism.org, waste management, wildlife, youth

Measuring a sea turtle

As Julio hauled the net into our skiff, we spied a green sea turtle ensnared in the mesh. In this case, we were happy to see our captive: Julio is the Magadalena Baykeeper on Mexico’s Baja Peninsula, and part of his job is working with Grupo Tortuguero — the world’s foremost sea turtle conservation group — to capture, study and release endangered turtles in order to help ensure their future.

Will You Miss the Animals You Never Knew?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | April 20th, 2011 | 10 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: bonobo, chimpanzees, China, climate change, conservation, Democratic Republic of Congo, environment, extinction, frogs, giant pandas, global-warming, greenhouse gas emissions, greenhouse gases, Gulf of California, habitat destruction, International Tiger Forum, mexico, nature, polar-bears, porpoises, species extinction, Tigers, vaquitas, World Wildlife Fund, Year of the Tiger

Polar bear

About four years ago, the U.S. Geological Survey released a projection report stating that two-thirds of the world’s polar bears would be gone by 2050. Their numbers would plummet, stated the report, due to shrinking summer sea ice caused by greenhouse gases. Since that time, images of polar bears have graced water bottles, T-shirts and tote bags. It’s now widely accepted that Ursus maritimus is the poster child for climate change.

We also know of other species in great peril — mostly because of media attention to them. According to the Chinese zodiac, 2010 was the Year of the Tiger, and last November the International Tiger Forum was held in St. Petersburg in the Russian Federation. As the world’s first global summit focused on saving a single species from extinction, the event received widespread news coverage.

Because their likenesses appear on TV screens and spearhead conservation campaigns, chances are that even if you don’t live in tiger or polar bear habitats — where it would at least be possible for you to run into them during your daily life — you would miss them if they disappeared from our planet. But will you mourn the extinction of other species living today if you’ve never heard of them?

Could Plastic Water Bottles Be Better for Nature Enthusiasts?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | December 29th, 2010 | 12 Comments
topic: Detox, Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: bottled water, carbon emissions, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, China, Churchill, CO2, crude oil, Eco Travel, eco-friendly, environment, environmentally friendly, fleece, garbage, Great Pacific Garbage Patch, health, hiking, landfills, nature, nature enthusiasts, oil, pet, plastic, plastic bottles, polar-bears, polyethylene terephthalate, recycling, reusable, stainless steel, stainless steel water bottles, tap, toxins, travel, waste, water bottles

Polar Bear in Chuchill

In the ten years since I’ve been embarking on nature travels, I’ve seen a lot of outdoor gear evolve. Hiking boots, thermal undergarments and GPS units are just some of the items that have undergone striking advances.

But the one essential piece of outdoor equipment that has gone through a gamut of changes, caused the most controversy and been the most intriguing is the water bottle.

Animal Memories: Should Wildlife Research Methods Be Changed?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | June 30th, 2010 | 6 Comments
topic: Eco Travel | tags: africa, bird banding, birds, China, crows, dogs, elephant, Gay Bradshaw, India, memory, memory formation, poaching, post-traumatic stress disorder, stress, The Kerulos Center

African elephants
There’s a great story that my mom used to tell regarding her family’s dog. It involved her brother, who was at the time a young man just returning from three long years in the Pacific theater during World War II. When he stepped out of the car and onto the lawn, the dog walked up to greet him, took a good look and a sniff and then began to jump and dance around uncontrollably. She did that for about 30 minutes straight. When she finally settled down, it wasn’t two minutes before she got up and expressed her joy all over again. She repeated this 30-to-two-minute cycle for the remainder of the day.