childhood obesity

Free Seminar! Beyond Addiction: Recovery 2.0

Tommy Rosen by Tommy Rosen | February 18th, 2013 | 3 Comments
topic: Fitness, Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: alcohol addiction, beyond addiction, childhood obesity, destructive behaviors, drug addiction, drugs, family, field of addition, food addiction, freedom, friends, getting clean, heart disease, lies, life beyond addiction, lying, medical pandemics, meditation, modalities of recovery, money addiction, optimal health, recovery 2.0, sex addiction, stress management, Tadasana Festival, the recovery diet, the twelve steps, Tommy Rosen, twisted thinking, type 2 diabetes, vibrant life, Yoga

tommy rosen

What is addiction? How does it feel to be an addict? What does it look like? Is there a way out, a place BEYOND ADDICTION? These critical questions and the way we answer them make the difference between living a life enslaved to destructive behaviors and one of freedom and expansion.

Most people are familiar with addiction to drugs or alcohol, but addiction takes many forms and it is everywhere around us, all the time. At its very core, addiction is any behavior you continue to engage in despite the negative consequences it brings. If we take the time to really look at ourselves and at the world around us, we don’t have to look hard to see it. Addiction is the root of some of the biggest challenges our society faces today. For example, the medical pandemics of childhood obesity, type 2-diabetes and heart disease are preventable lifestyle diseases driven in large part by addiction.

As an addict you feel stuck, incapable of giving up that thing that you “need” to survive, to function. It twists your thinking, your experience of the world. Addiction leaves you lying to your friends, to your family, to yourself. Being an addict is like being in a small dark room where the only exit seems to be locked from the outside.

The truth is that there is a way out, a way BEYOND ADDICTION. Though neither easy, nor a road one travels alone, a life beyond the grips of addiction is very real. At one time I was stuck in that downward spiral, but after 21 years of recovery I am living proof that an expansive and vibrant life beyond addiction can and does exist.

Kids Unleashed

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | June 5th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Family Health, Fitness, Green Living, Health & Wellness | tags: abduction, asthma, bike to school, childhood obesity, Etan Patz, exercise, Fitness, high blood pressure, kids, milk carton, missing child, nature, outdoors, outside, parenting, physical activity, safety, stranger danger, type 2 diabetes, unsupervised children, walk to school

Group Of Children Running In Park

My nine-year-old is covered with mosquito bites, bruises and scratches. From the time she arrives home from school until I call her for dinner, she’s AWOL — running through woods, building forts out of sticks, catching toads … .

To hear some parents tell it, the fact that I haven’t a clue exactly where my nine-year-old is for an hour or more at a time is evidence of poor parenting, if not outright criminal neglect. And with a recent arrest in the cold case of six-year-old Etan Patz (the first missing child to have his face on a milk carton), this sentiment increasingly runs high.

Gourmet Is a Good Thing

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | January 31st, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: breakfast, childhood obesity, children, clean your plate, diet, dinner, environmental, food, force-feeding, fresh produce, fruits and vegetables, fun, gourmet, health, healthy-eating, hunger, hungry, in-season, ingredients, junk food, kids, local farms, lunch, meals, mother, organic, parenting, picky eater, processed, recipes, soup, sugar, sustainable, weight, whole grain

Boy eating dinner at a restaurantI know it might sound obnoxious at first and that I sound a little like Martha Stewart with that headline, but I like the idea of raising gourmet kids. By “gourmet,” I don’t mean kids who demand white tablecloths and truffle oil. What I mean is simply someone with an appreciation of good food. Here’s how Webster’s defines it:

Food Addiction: Could It Explain Why 70% of Americans Are Overweight?

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | December 7th, 2010 | 6 Comments
topic: Detox, Family Health, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: addictive, alcohol, appetite, calories, childhood obesity, children, detox, diet, disease, drugs, eating, fat, food addiction, food industry, government regulation, Huffington Post, hunger, junk food, kids, labeling, Mark Hyman, menu, michael pollan, nutrition, overeating, overweight, parenting, portion control, restaurants, school lunch, suger, weight-loss, withdrawal

Woman eating doughnuts

Our government and food industry both encourage more “personal responsibility” when it comes to battling the obesity epidemic and its associated diseases. They say people should exercise more self-control, make better choices, avoid overeating and reduce their intake of sugar-sweetened drinks and processed food. We are led to believe that there is no good food or bad food — that it’s all just a matter of balance.

Create Your Own “Family Food Code”

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | September 23rd, 2010 | 7 Comments
topic: Family Health, Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: buy local, chemicals, childhood obesity, children, diet, family meals, food code, Food Rules, kids lunch, michael pollan, Nina Planck, recipes, sustainable food, The Matrix, The Omnivore's Dilemma

Little girl sitting at the dinner table

A few months ago I wrote a blog post about how the more I learned about industrial agriculture and food processing, the more I felt like Neo in the movie The Matrix. Once Neo is exposed to the reality of his world (that humans are actually raised purely to create energy for machines, and a virtual reality has been created to placate the people in their “pods” so they never become aware of their predicament), he can’t go back to his previous existence — even though he probably really wants to.

Convenience Is Killing Us

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | June 28th, 2010 | 4 Comments
topic: Family Health, Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Healthy Home | tags: advertising, cell phones, childhood obesity, computers, convenience, food, frozen dinner, hypertension, television, toxins, World War II

tv dinner tray with medical supplies on it

I’m curious when we traded common sense for convenience. I’m guessing it was around the time we stopped trusting ourselves. The same time we started believing all those claims that we could “have it all.” We can. But we pay a price for it.