carbon emissions

Are There Too Many Climate Change Deniers in Congress?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | January 14th, 2014 | 3 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: carbon emissions, climate change, democrat, environment, extinction, global-warming, Greenland, health, icebergs, Industrial Revolution, nature, ocean health, republican, travel, wellness

Recently, while reading the November/December 2013 issue of Sierra, the magazine of the Sierra Club, I came across a graphic that startled me. It depicted two columns, labeled “House” and “Senate.” Under each of those titles were two more columns, showing the number of Democrats and Republicans in each branch of the legislature that are climate change deniers. Under the House section were 200 Democrats; none were listed as climate change deniers. Of the 233 Republicans, 128 deny climate change.

In the Senate, there were 52 Democrats (with two Independents), again with 0 climate change deniers. Of the 46 Republicans, 30 deny that the world is warming.

My goal here is not to cast aspersions on any one party but to look at the big picture. It is possible that we can make strides to protect the planet against the devastating effects caused by rapid climate change if our leadership fails to believe it is real?

Celebrate Earth Day — At Home!

Cheryl Terrace by Cheryl Terrace | April 20th, 2012 | 4 Comments
topic: Green Living, Healthy Home | tags: apartment, carbon emissions, chemicals, Earth Day, eco-home, energy, environment, green cleaners, green home, Green Living, house, house plants, houseplant, LED lighting, lightbulbs, non-toxic cleaning supplies, organic bedding, organic food, organic sheets, organic towels, planet, plastic, toxic, water conservation

Earth Day Home BlogWith only a couple days to go until Earth Day, prepare to get inundated with a billion things we can do — should do — to save our planet. Although there will likely be plenty of events to attend and planet-themed parties to enjoy, one of the best places you can celebrate Earth Day is in your own home!

If our homes are a reflection and expression of our lifestyles and values, then it makes sense that we start making conscious (i.e. green) choices at home. The issues affecting the Earth — from the oil crisis to water shortages to disappearing species — are complex, and can seem distant and insurmountable, but it is essential to understand the correlation between our everyday environments and our larger ecosystem. Everything and everyone is interconnected, and even the simplest act, such as turning the water off when we brush our teeth, creates positive change.

Going Geothermal with Ground Source Heat

E.B. Boyd by E.B. Boyd | March 29th, 2012 | 1 Comment
topic: Green Living, Green Tech | tags: carbon emissions, clean energy, climate change, Department of Energy, electricity, energy efficiency, energy efficiency rebates, environment, fossil fuels, geoexchange system, geothermal, geothermal system, global-warming, green energy, green home, green incentives, ground source heat pump, GSHP, HVAC, renewable-energy, solar-power, sustainability, tax incentives, the grid, wind power

geothermal heat

Sure, you’ve thought about adding solar panels to your roof as a way of reducing your home’s carbon footprint. Maybe you’ve even given wind power a gander. But what about ground source heat pumps?

Hydropower Dams: Clean Energy Source or Threat to Wildlife?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | March 17th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: American Rivers, bald eagles, carbon dioxide levels, carbon emissions, clean energy, climate change, damming, dams, electricity, environment, fish, fossil fuel emissions, fossil fuels, global-warming, Hetch Hetchy Valley, hydropower, increasing energy demands, renewable, river otters, salmon, save the environment, water, waterways, wildlife watching, Yosemite National Park

Bald Eagle

Your city or town probably either has a large, brand-new hydropower dam or you know of an old one, located on the outskirts; a crumbling relic from an earlier period in your state’s history. I know this because according to the national nonprofit conservation organization American Rivers, on average our country has constructed one dam every day since the signing of the Declaration of Independence. And the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers counts approximately 75,000 dams that are greater than six feet along the waterways of the United States. In addition, there are at least tens of thousands of smaller dams spanning our rivers and streams.

Whichever version of the structure is in your area, it seems that dams divide us. While some regard them as a clean energy source, others view them as a danger to river otters and fish populations.

So, are our dams good for the environment, or a threat to wildlife? 

Should Human and Veterinary Medicine Be Combined Into One Field of Study?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | March 18th, 2011 | 5 Comments
topic: Green Living | tags: air pollution, air quality, airports, animals, bedbugs, biomonitors, birds, blood samples, canary in the coal mine, carbon emissions, carbon monoxide, contaminants, doctors, dogs, environment, German honey bees, health care, heavy metals, honey, human health, infestation, Massachusetts, medical schools, methane, miners, monkeys, One Health Initiative, pharmaceuticals, Salem, science, species, toxic gases, toxins, veterinarians, veterniary medicine, West Nile virus, zoonotic diseases

Honey bee on a flower

The fictional Ace Ventura may be tops when it comes to pet detectives, but the real animal gumshoes may be of the nonhuman sort — at least when it comes to environmental issues. More and more, we are recognizing the incredible powers of observation and deduction our fellow creatures possess, and we are using them to help us uncover the “bad guys” in our air, homes and workplaces.

Would You Dine on Insects to Save the Planet?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | January 21st, 2011 | 10 Comments
topic: Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: agave worms, agriculture, ants, beef, bees, beetles, bugs, carbon emissions, cicadas, climate change, crickets, crops, diet, eating, entomophagy, environment, factory farming, farmers, fat, fish, food, global food shortage, grasshoppers, health, healthy, insect farming, insects, larvae, meat, methane, nutrition, pests, population growth, production, protein, tarantulas, termites, toxins, water

Dragonfly

If it’s late morning or mid-afternoon where you are, chances are that you’ve already had at least one fleeting thought about dinner tonight. You may be picturing a juicy steak, a tender pork roast or a golden, baked chicken. I doubt that many of you dream about a steaming plate of stink beetles, leeches or cave spiders.

Could Plastic Water Bottles Be Better for Nature Enthusiasts?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | December 29th, 2010 | 12 Comments
topic: Detox, Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: bottled water, carbon emissions, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, China, Churchill, CO2, crude oil, Eco Travel, eco-friendly, environment, environmentally friendly, fleece, garbage, Great Pacific Garbage Patch, health, hiking, landfills, nature, nature enthusiasts, oil, pet, plastic, plastic bottles, polar-bears, polyethylene terephthalate, recycling, reusable, stainless steel, stainless steel water bottles, tap, toxins, travel, waste, water bottles

Polar Bear in Chuchill

In the ten years since I’ve been embarking on nature travels, I’ve seen a lot of outdoor gear evolve. Hiking boots, thermal undergarments and GPS units are just some of the items that have undergone striking advances.

But the one essential piece of outdoor equipment that has gone through a gamut of changes, caused the most controversy and been the most intriguing is the water bottle.

Meat: Much More Than What’s for Dinner

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | December 14th, 2010 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Personal Growth | tags: bacon, carbon emissions, chickens, cooking class, cows, cruelty to animals, eating, Eating Animals, environment, farmers’ market, fishing, free range, healthy food, heart health, hunting, inhuman, Jonathan Safran Foer, kids, meat, meatless Mondays, morals, parenting, pets, pigs, protein, slaughterhouse, steak, sustainable diet, The Enchanted Broccoli Forest, vegan, vegetarian, vegetarianism

Cow on a feedlotI will never forget the day I explained to my then four-year-old son that steak is really cow. First he cried, then he asked why we don’t eat dogs like our lab Lewis, or at least the lost dogs at the pound. I didn’t have a very good answer for that one. Which really got me thinking.

5 Easy Tips for Greener Holiday Travel

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | November 22nd, 2010 | 1 Comment
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: airplane, airport shuttle, bus, car, carbon emissions, Carbonfund.org, carryon, christmas, climate change, CO2, driving, eco transportation, flight, flying, fuel, gas mileage, global-warming, holiday travel, luggage, offsetting, oil, packing, plane, road trip, TerraPass, thanksgiving, train, traveler

Man at the train station

“Over the river and through the woods …”

Chances are, you’ll be traveling this holiday season, whether it’s a road trip to Grandma’s house or a cross-country flight to join relatives around the table for a seasonal feast. Though we all know that travel contributes to a warming climate, none of us is likely to call off the family gathering as a means of reducing C02 emissions.

Is Going Green Just a Feel-Good Choice?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | November 18th, 2010 | 5 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: automobiles, bats, bird deaths, birds, Canada geese, canoe, carbon emissions, cars, chemicals, climate change, CO2, eco-friendly, energy, environment, environmental toxins, environmentalist, fossil fuels, green, green building, greenwashing, Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, kayak, kayaking, landfills, LEED, LEED buildings, LEED certification, nature enthusiasts, nature photography, nature photos, photography, plastic, power grid, recreation, recycler, recycling, sandhill cranes, save the environment, skyscrapers, songbirds, toxins, transportation, travel, turbines, water sports, weather, wildlife, wind farms, wind power

Sandhill cranes

Buying a kayak qualifies as a “big purchase” for my family, and my husband and I recently took that huge step. Although we’ve had a canoe for a long time, this is our first acquisition of this type of silent-sports, aquatic craft.