Canada

When You’d Rather Leave Home for the Holidays: 5 Nurturing Escapes

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | December 10th, 2013 | 1 Comment
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: African safari, Arkansas, Arlington Hotel, beach, Belize, Cambodia, Canada, Cannon Beach, Caribbean. Maho Bay Camp, Cascade Canyon, christmas, colorado, Devil’s Thumb Ranch, Eco Travel, family gathering, Freestone Inn, Hanalei Colony Resort, Hanukkah, hawaii, holiday travel, hot springs resort, Kanantik Reef Resort, Kauai, Maine, Mazama, Methow Valley, New Mexico, new year's, North Cascades National Park, ocean, Ojo Caliente, Oregon, Pagosa Springs, relatives, santa fe, skiing, snow, spa, St. John, St. Thomas, Stephanie Inn, Stowe, The Sound of Music, The Springs Resort & Spa, Trapp Family Lodge, Vancouver Island, Vermont, Virgin Islands, volunteer vacation, voluntourism, Washington, Wickaninnish Inn, winter vacation

Christmas at the beach

“Oh there’s no place like home for the holidays…”

I can hear Perry Como crooning those familiar words now, evoking images of that Norman Rockwell family gathered round the holiday table, turkey steaming, silver gleaming, family smiling … The idea of home for many of us evokes thoughts of comfort, welcome, love and belonging. Or it should, in an ideal world. But the reality of going home, especially during the holiday season, may be very different.

Expectations often don’t match the inevitable reality: while you may be yearning for ‘peace on earth, good will toward men,’ the fact is, those relatives you don’t get along with the rest of the year are unlikely to make a miraculous change for a day or two. Maybe your children have fledged the nest and won’t be home this year. If they’ve married, they may be spending the holidays at someone else’s home. Perhaps this is the first holiday you’re facing after the death of a loved one. The thought of going through the motions in the midst of grief holds little appeal.

Whatever the circumstance, there are occasions when you may not feel like singing “I’ll Be Home for Christmas” with Bing Crosby. Spending part of the season far from stressful settings may be just the gift to give yourself … Or, you may wish to pack up the family just this once and go some place more restful, without all the hassle and hoopla — at least not any that you have to host and clean up after!

If you’re feeling impulsive, last-minute deals at the holiday season are often available to fill cancellations or leftover space — it’s worth a few Google inquiries, if you’re in the mood to mosey. So, whether it’s this year or another, here are five holiday travel ideas to restore body, soul or both.

Should Animals on the Brink of Extinction Be Used to Promote Tourism?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | November 25th, 2013 | 9 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: African elephants, animals, Antarctica, at-risk species, Belize, Canada, Churchill, climate change, Eco Travel, ecotourism, Egypt, endangered-species, environment, extinction, extinction tourism, Galápagos Islands, glaciers, global-warming, habitat destruction, Madagascar, Manitoba, natural-habitat-adventures, nature, poaching, polar-bears, rainforest, Tanzania, tourism, tourists, travel, travelers, UNESCO, wildlife, wolves, Yellowstone National Park

Greenland big ice

I have to admit it: last year, my traveling to Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, to see polar bears in the wild was motivated not only by a 10-year anniversary but by a fear that soon the animals could be gone. I go to see glaciers because I’m afraid we’re losing them. And this coming January, I’m returning to Yellowstone National Park to try to photograph our nation’s wolves before they almost completely disappear in the Lower 48 — again.

You could call me an “extinction tourist.”

I’m far from unique. In fact, today people are traveling in ever-greater numbers to see what they think could quickly vanish from the Earth. While just a few years ago travelers might have endeavored to tick off all seven continents or Africa’s Big Five wildlife species, today there’s a certain “cred” given to those who see the landscapes, animals and plants that are just managing to hang on. And tour providers are tapping into that desire with their marketing messages. “See [fill in your favorite endangered animals] before they’re gone!”

But should tourism companies use threatened species as marketing tools? Given our ability to tune out ads, does that minimize the dire circumstances that these animals and environments are now in and dilute the attention that conservation messages might have been able to muster?

7 “Yoga and More” Retreats to Nurture Body & Spirit

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | October 21st, 2013 | 7 Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Fitness, Green Living, Yoga | tags: Apostle Islands, backpacking, Banff, Big Sky Yoga Retreats, Canada, Canyon Lands, Cascade Mountains, Cowgirl Yoga, cycling, Eco Travel, EcoYoga Adventures, Green Living, Haramara Retreat, hiking, horseback riding, italy, Kaf Adventures, kayaking, Lake Superior, Laos, Lumeria, Madeline Island Yoga Retreats, Maui, meditation, mexico, Montana, Mount Rainier, outdoor activities, Puerto Vallarta, Punta de Mita, Sayulita, SoulFit Adventures, Southeast Asia, stand-up paddleboarding, SUP, surfing, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin, Yellowstone, yoga classes, yoga retreats

yoga retreats stand-up paddleboarding

If you’ve avoided yoga retreats as a vacation option because you’re worried you’ll spend all your time contorted in meditative silence, it’s time to take another look. Not only do many yoga retreats blend spa treatments and body work with asanas, but a whole new trend combines contemplative practice with activities such as horseback riding, mountain biking, stand-up paddle boarding and other outdoor pursuits.

Chill Out! 5 Winter Travel Adventures to Celebrate the Cold

Wendy Worrall Redal by Wendy Worrall Redal | January 25th, 2012 | 2 Comments
topic: Eco Travel | tags: Absolut Ice Bar, alaska, Arctic Circle, aurora borealis, Canada, China, Churchill, cold weather, dog sledding, Eco Travel, eco-friendly travel, gray wolves, Greenland, Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival, ice hotel, ice sculptures, IceHotel, Japan, Manitoba, natural-habitat-adventures, northern lights, Quebec Winter Carnival, Sapporo Snow Festival, snow sculptures, Swedish Lapland, winter travel, Yellowstone National Park

Dog SledWith a few exceptions, much of the U.S. has been experiencing an unseasonably warm and dry winter. While that may make some people happy, those of us who welcome snow, sweaters, skating and skiing are missing winter’s frosty grip.

If you’re feeling as blah as the brown landscape outside, consider a mid-winter adventure to colder climes. There’s nothing like nature beauteously transformed by an icy white veneer to lift even the most listless spirit. From dog sledding to tracking wolves, sleeping in an ice hotel and watching the Northern Lights, cold-weather travel is all kinds of cool!

Can Eco-Tours Help the Future of Spirit Bears?

Candice Gaukel Andrews by Candice Gaukel Andrews | October 12th, 2009 | No Comments
topic: Eco Travel, Green Living | tags: bears, British Columbia, Canada, conservation, Eco Travel, nature, nature travel, nature trips, protecting wildlife, rainforests, solitude, wild animals, wilderness, wildlife

polarbearfeature

Only about 400 Spirit Bears remain. ©Candice Gaukel Andrews

It almost sounds mythical.

But there’s truly a place on the far western edge of our continent where a rare animal — a white black bear — can still hunt, fish, gather berries and raise cubs unbothered by humans. There are no roads here, no cut trails, few settlements and even fewer trappings of civilization. It’s a good place to be a bear.