artificial sweeteners

How Diet Soda Makes You Fat

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | April 23rd, 2013 | 2 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: american journal of clinical nutrition, Americans, artificial sweeteners, bad diet, bad foods, belly fat, body weight, brain chemistry, calories, carbs, cholesterol, coca-cola, cocaine, coke, diabetes, diet, diet drinks, diet soda, eat less, exercise, fat, fat storage, fat-free, food, food addiction, food industry, fruit juices, good foods, insulin, loose weight, low-fat food, metabolism, moderation, no-calorie drinks, obese, obesity, overweight, politics, processed foods, protein, run, sick, sugar, sugary drinks, supersize, taste buds, type 2 diabetes, willpower

How do you lose weight? Substitute diet drinks for sugary drinks. Eat low-fat foods. Just eat less of the bad foods — it’s all about the calories. We are told, “Just have more willpower.”

These ideas are false. They are food- and diet-industry propaganda that makes and keeps us fat and sick. Lies by the food industry combined with bad government policy based on food industry lobbying are the major causes of our obesity and diabetes epidemic.

Now, more than 35 percent of Americans are obese, and almost 70 percent are overweight. This is not an accident but the result of careful marketing and money in politics.

We are told it is all about making better choices. If we all took more personal responsibility, we could stop this obesity and diabetes epidemic. We have been told there are no good or bad foods, that the key to weight loss is moderation. And, of course, if we all just exercised more, all of us would lose weight. These ideas hold us hostage.

Kernels of Wisdom

Bevin Wallace by Bevin Wallace | July 29th, 2011 | No Comments
topic: Family Health, Green Living, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: artificial sweeteners, buy local, carbohydrates, carbs, corn, diet, dietary fiber, folate, food, high fructose corn syrup, local corn, locally-grown food, michael pollan, nutrition, organic corn, organic food, peaches, sugar, summer, Summertime Salsa Recipe, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, tomatoes, vegetables, vitamin C, whole grains

Girl eating corn

For as long as I can remember, corn has been one of my favorite summertime foods. As a kid, I loved to sit on the picnic table in our backyard shucking ear after ear of the patchwork white-and-pale-yellow Olathe sweet corn my mom would bring home by the bushel. Later I’d slather it with butter and salt and sink my teeth in the way my dog attacks a meaty beef bone.

When I got my braces in fifth grade, I learned to eat corn on the cob one row at a time to minimize the hardware-cleaning process (corn was officially forbidden by the orthodontist, but I really think I outsmarted him on this one; don’t ask about my Milk Dud incident). I always thought eating something as nutritious as a fresh vegetable — especially since I loved it so much — was worth it.

Sugar Addiction? It Might Be Genetic

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | April 15th, 2011 | 3 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: addiction, addicts, alcohol, amino acids, appetite, artificial sweeteners, bedtime, blood sugar, breakfast, chemicals, Chromium, cravings, diabetes, diet, dopamine receptor, dr. mark hyman, drugs, eating before bed, food, food allergies, Food sensitivities, fruit juice, genes, genetics, glucomannan, glutamine, hormones, hunger, inflammation, insulin, medical research, neurotransmitters, nutrition, nutritional deficiencies, omega-3 fatty acids, pleasure, protein, refined sugar, reward centers, Rhodiola, science, sleep, small meals, soda, stress, sugar, tyrosine and 5-HTP, Vitamin D, weight-loss, willpower

Hand reaching into a cookie jarWe’re all programmed to like sugar, but new research shows that some people are genetically much more prone to sugar addiction than others.

As I noted in my previous blog on food addiction, science demonstrates that people can be biologically addicted to sugar and other foods in the same way people can be addicted to heroin, cocaine or nicotine. Bingeing and addictive behaviors are eerily similar in alcoholics and sugar addicts. In fact, many recovering alcoholics switch to another easily available drug: sugar.