alcohol

Six Ways I Changed My Life and How You Can Change Yours

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | December 14th, 2011 | 2 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: adrenaline, alcohol, body, caffeine, chronic fatigue syndrome, detox, diet, dr. mark hyman, drugs, energy, exercise, Fitness, food, health, healthy-eating, immune system, nutrition, protein, sleep, sugar

Changed My LifeTwenty years ago, as a freshly minted doctor, I swallowed the propaganda that doctors are invincible — that “MD” stood for “medical deity.” During my training, one of my surgical residents told me, “real doctors don’t do lunch.” I thought I didn’t need to follow the same rules of biology like everyone else. I believed sleeping, eating real food and resting were luxuries, not necessities.

In fact, even though I knew all about nutrition and living a healthy lifestyle and had always exercised, I felt I could push the boundaries of my body. When I started my medical career, I worked 80-100 hours a week as a family doctor in a small town in Idaho. I delivered hundreds of babies, ran the emergency room, and saw 30-40 patients a day. Sleep was an afterthought. I ordered Starbucks coffee by the case straight from Seattle, bought an espresso machine and served up 4-5 espressos a day. I lived in a perpetual state of fatigue and pushed my way through on adrenalin.

Sugar Addiction? It Might Be Genetic

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | April 15th, 2011 | 3 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: addiction, addicts, alcohol, amino acids, appetite, artificial sweeteners, bedtime, blood sugar, breakfast, chemicals, Chromium, cravings, diabetes, diet, dopamine receptor, dr. mark hyman, drugs, eating before bed, food, food allergies, Food sensitivities, fruit juice, genes, genetics, glucomannan, glutamine, hormones, hunger, inflammation, insulin, medical research, neurotransmitters, nutrition, nutritional deficiencies, omega-3 fatty acids, pleasure, protein, refined sugar, reward centers, Rhodiola, science, sleep, small meals, soda, stress, sugar, tyrosine and 5-HTP, Vitamin D, weight-loss, willpower

Hand reaching into a cookie jarWe’re all programmed to like sugar, but new research shows that some people are genetically much more prone to sugar addiction than others.

As I noted in my previous blog on food addiction, science demonstrates that people can be biologically addicted to sugar and other foods in the same way people can be addicted to heroin, cocaine or nicotine. Bingeing and addictive behaviors are eerily similar in alcoholics and sugar addicts. In fact, many recovering alcoholics switch to another easily available drug: sugar.

How Yoga Made Me an Enlightened Eater

Kathryn Budig by Kathryn Budig | April 13th, 2011 | 10 Comments
topic: Detox, Fitness, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Yoga | tags: 21-day Standard Process cleanse, acupuncture, alcohol, ayurveda, caffeine, change, dairy, detox, diet, farmers market, fermented foods, flour, food, grocery store, health, healthy-eating, homeopathy, journey, junk food, Kathryn Budig, lifestyle, nuts, organic, processed food, raw food, smoothie, sugar, supplements, wheat, whole food, Yoga

Yoga DietI love food and I’m pretty sure it’s got a thing for me too.

I grew up in Kansas where cheese came in the form of a thin orange square wrapped in plastic. Dinner often came out of a box and I thought Miracle Whip and mayonnaise were the same thing. I lived blissfully unaware as I continued into my college years thinking the vegetable garden blend of cream cheese was healthy because it contained vegetables. You can’t fault a Kansas girl for trying.

It wasn’t until I started a full-time yoga practice that I started to change my ways. The interesting part was that no one pushed their yogic eating principles on me. It was simple — the more I practiced, the more my desire for good, healthy fuel grew.

3 Simple Steps to Eliminate Heartburn and Acid Reflux

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | March 10th, 2011 | 3 Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Healthy Aging, Healthy Eating | tags: abdominal pain, absorption, acid reflux, acid-blocking medications, alcohol, anemia, bacteria, bloating, caffeine, calcium, celiac disease, cigarettes, citrus, Clostridia, dairy, deficiency, dementia, depression, DGL, diarrhea, diet, digestion, drugs, enzymes, esophagus, fatigue, food, food allergies, Food sensitivities, fried food, gas, gastroesophageal reflux disease, GERD, glutamine, gluten, H. pylori, health, heartburn, Helicobacter pylori, hiatal hernia, IBS, irritable bowel syndrome, licorice, magnesium, Mark Hyman, medical, medicine, nerve damage, Nexium, obesity, osteoporosis, overweight, Pepcid, pharmaceuticals, Prevacid, Prilosec OTC, probiotics, relaxation, side effects, small intestine, smoking, sphincter, spicy, stomach, stomach acid, stress, tomato, upper endoscopy, upper GI, valve, vitamin B12, wellness, Xifaxin, yeast, zinc carnosine

Man with heartburnAre millions of us born with a genetic defect that makes us produce too much stomach acid? Do we just have a major evolutionary design flaw that requires us to take powerful acid-blocking drugs to prevent heartburn and reflux?

I believe that the answer to all of these questions is a resounding “no.”

At least 10 percent of Americans have episodes of heartburn every day, and 44 percent have symptoms at least once a month. Overall, reflux and heartburn (also known as GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease) affect a whopping 25 to 35 percent of the U.S. population! As a result, acid-blocking medications are the third-top-selling type of drug in America today. Two other drugs to treat reflux, Nexium and Prevacid, are among the world’s best-selling drugs and account for approximately $5.1 and $3.4 billion in sales annually.

Food Addiction: Could It Explain Why 70% of Americans Are Overweight?

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | December 7th, 2010 | 6 Comments
topic: Detox, Family Health, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: addictive, alcohol, appetite, calories, childhood obesity, children, detox, diet, disease, drugs, eating, fat, food addiction, food industry, government regulation, Huffington Post, hunger, junk food, kids, labeling, Mark Hyman, menu, michael pollan, nutrition, overeating, overweight, parenting, portion control, restaurants, school lunch, suger, weight-loss, withdrawal

Woman eating doughnuts

Our government and food industry both encourage more “personal responsibility” when it comes to battling the obesity epidemic and its associated diseases. They say people should exercise more self-control, make better choices, avoid overeating and reduce their intake of sugar-sweetened drinks and processed food. We are led to believe that there is no good food or bad food — that it’s all just a matter of balance.