addiction

This Joint Is Jumping — Getting Comfortable in an Unstable Body

Jill Miller by Jill Miller | March 13th, 2013 | 6 Comments
topic: Fitness, Yoga | tags: addiction, Astanga, body, bulimia, eating disorder, fanatic, joint cracking, joints, overuse injury, pain, recovery, Relationships, Repetitive Stress Injury, Repetitive Stress Syndrome, self-massage, strength training, tissue breakdown, too much yoga, Yoga, yoga poses

yoga

Are you addicted to crack? Cracking your joints, I mean! There were years during my 20s when I could not fathom getting through my early-morning yoga practice without popping my shoulders, low back, hips and neck. I was popping and cracking my way through the day like a one-woman band.

Usually these fast internal whacks felt great, a rush that temporarily relieved aches and pains. What I didn’t know at the time was that all that cracking was not only emblematic of my body’s instability, but it was accelerating my own tissue breakdown.

A Lesson in Compassion

Leslie Garrett by Leslie Garrett | September 24th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Personal Growth, Relationships | tags: acceptance, addiction, addicts, anger, anxiety, Aspberger’s syndrome, compassion, crime, drug abuse, drugs, fear, high school, intolerance, methadone clinic, neighbors, obsessive-compulsive disorder, OCD, opiates, patience, protest, protesters, protestors, safety, understanding

CompassionIn the east end of my city is a methadone clinic, a safe place where opiate addicts can ingest a less harmful substitute under the supervision of doctors and addiction specialists. This clinic is new, operating out of a pharmacy in a residential area.

Concerned residents, led by a university student who lives in the area, are outraged that a methadone clinic was opened without consulting the neighborhood, though it adheres to the city’s bylaw that clinics in residential areas serve no more than 40 people.

The group has taken to photographing the addicts as they come and go, which has, of course, created an environment of fear and shame among those who use the clinic, already prone, as addicts often are, to fear and shame.

These protesters insist that they’re only taking photographs so that “if crime increases,” they’ll have shots of the “likely criminals.”

The media story around this has inspired equal anger on the parts of many citizens, who have sent e-mails filled with threats and accusations to the protesters. An eye for an eye, it would seem.

Tommy Rosen on Yoga for Addiction and Recovery

Gaiam Staff by Gaiam Staff | August 20th, 2012 | No Comments
topic: Health & Wellness, Personal Growth, Yoga | tags: 12 step program, AA, addiction, Alcoholics Anonymous, alcoholism, Big Happy Day, drugs, healing, meditation, recovery, sobriety, Tommy Rosen, yoga for addiction and recovery

Tommy Rosen is a California-based yoga teacher specializing in yoga for addiction and recovery. He has been on the path of sobriety for more than 20 years now, and he has found that the most powerful tools in healing from addiction are a combination of yoga, meditation and the 12-step recovery program. His biggest take-away for addicts is to reach out to their communities, as he believes that collaboration is the best method for healing. To learn more, visit TommyRosen.com.

10 Reasons to Quit Your Coffee

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | July 6th, 2012 | 8 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating | tags: 5-HIA, acidity, addiction, antioxidants, blood sugar, caffeine, cardiovascular disease, catecholamines, cholesterol, chronic disease, coffee habit, cortisol, detox, diabesity, diet, diterpenes, doctor, dysbiosis, energy, GERD, glucose levels, glycemic index, health, healthy, heart burn, heart disease, Huffington Post, indigestion, inflammation, insomnia, insulin resistance, Mark Hyman, nutrition, serotonin, sleep, stress, triglycerides, type 2 diabetes, withdrawal

10 Reasons to Quit Coffee

Coffee: Is it good or bad for us? You might get media whiplash trying to figure that out. The truth is, I find this subject to be as confusing as you probably do.

After all, the media certainly doesn’t help clarify whether America’s favorite morning beverage is going to land you in the doc’s office or set you free with a clean bill of health. It’s no wonder so many of you shrug your shoulders in utter confusion as you refill your morning mug and get on with your day!

I know all about this adoration of coffee. I, too, was smitten and enamored with Coffea Arabica. We had our courtship during the 1990s, when I worked more than 80 hours in the emergency room and saw 30 to 40 patients a day.

I traded sleep for espresso, authentic energy for Haagen Daz coffee ice cream and normal circadian rhythms for high-speed, caffeinated adrenaline rushes.

But then, my body began to communicate to me what I had been attempting to ignore — that I needed to slow down and let the natural systems assume their proper course. You can read more about how I successfully turned my health around here.

As I began to tune into my body and provide it with what it really wanted — fresh, whole, real, unprocessed foods; sleep; relaxation; and the time to enjoy the life I had created for myself and my family — I was able to break up with coffee and make up with my health.

You can too, and I’m going to tell you how. But first, let’s discuss what makes coffee such a hot topic widely disputed in today’s health circles.

Sugar Addiction? It Might Be Genetic

Mark Hyman, M.D. by Mark Hyman, M.D. | April 15th, 2011 | 3 Comments
topic: Detox, Health & Wellness, Healthy Eating, Weight Loss | tags: addiction, addicts, alcohol, amino acids, appetite, artificial sweeteners, bedtime, blood sugar, breakfast, chemicals, Chromium, cravings, diabetes, diet, dopamine receptor, dr. mark hyman, drugs, eating before bed, food, food allergies, Food sensitivities, fruit juice, genes, genetics, glucomannan, glutamine, hormones, hunger, inflammation, insulin, medical research, neurotransmitters, nutrition, nutritional deficiencies, omega-3 fatty acids, pleasure, protein, refined sugar, reward centers, Rhodiola, science, sleep, small meals, soda, stress, sugar, tyrosine and 5-HTP, Vitamin D, weight-loss, willpower

Hand reaching into a cookie jarWe’re all programmed to like sugar, but new research shows that some people are genetically much more prone to sugar addiction than others.

As I noted in my previous blog on food addiction, science demonstrates that people can be biologically addicted to sugar and other foods in the same way people can be addicted to heroin, cocaine or nicotine. Bingeing and addictive behaviors are eerily similar in alcoholics and sugar addicts. In fact, many recovering alcoholics switch to another easily available drug: sugar.

When Yoga Hurts Instead of Heals

Jill Miller by Jill Miller | November 4th, 2010 | 12 Comments
topic: Fitness, Yoga | tags: addiction, asanas, back-pain, biomechanics, drop backs, flexibility, forward bend, forward fold, headstand, injuries, joint torque, neck pain, nerve damage, Patricia Sullivan, plow pose, practice, sciatic pain, shoulder stand, theraputic, Veeparita Korani Mudra, Yoga, Yoga Journal, yoga poses, Yoga Tune Up, Yoga Tune Up®, yoga-therapy

Woman doing a painful yoga posePain, numbness, tingling? Do any of these describe the feelings you have when you come out of an asana? Please heed these warnings! Not all yoga poses are safe for all people. Just follow expert yoga teacher Patricia Sullivan’s story in the October 2010 issue of Yoga Journal. She painfully details a journey of denial in which her headstand caused (yes, caused) crippling nerve pain that eventually culminated in her falling asleep at the wheel and driving off the road into a lagoon.

The Search for Self: Healing Old Wounds to Live Life Renewed

Cynthia James by Cynthia James | May 27th, 2010 | 6 Comments
topic: Personal Growth | tags: addiction, affirmation, change, healing, intention, Oprah, starting over, transformation

Recently, Oprah did this wonderful show on women, food and God. I love that she makes us aware of topics that cause us to pause and reassess how we live. As I contemplated this show, it led me to think about the fact that all addictions have a root cause. That cause is not wanting to “feel” something, or trying to find our worth, our power and our life outside of ourselves.