zen

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, life, present moment, and spiritual warrior

Everyone lets the present moment slip by, then looks for it as though he thought it was somewhere else. No one seems to have noticed this fact. But grasping this firmly, one must pile experience upon experience. And once one has come to this understanding he will be a different person from that point on, though he may not always bare it in mind. When one understands this settling into single-mindedness well, his affairs will thin out.

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tesshu (?) on haiku, zen, bushido, moon, water, reflection, reality, and japan

The moon does not think to be reflected, nor does the water think to reflect, in the Hirosawa Pond.

Tesshu (?)

Source: The Sword of No Sword

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, life, on-going practice, and spiritual warrior

It is not good to settle into a set of opinions. It is a mistake to put forth effort and obtain some understanding and then stop at that. At first putting forth great effort to be sure that you have grasped the basics, then practicing so that they may come to fruition is something that will never stop for your whole lifetime. Do not rely on following the degree of understanding that you have discovered, but simply think, "This is not enough."

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Deishu on zen and spiritual warrior

If a fine sword is not constantly polished, it will never show its luster. If you don't practice, you will never be able to master universals and particulars. Plenty of people can talk about Zen, but not many can live it. Get to work!

Deishu

Source: The Sword of No Sword

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, life, rain, and spiritual warrior

There is something to be learned from a rainstorm. When meeting with a sudden shower, you try not to get wet and run quickly along the road. But doing such things as passing under the eaves of houses, you still get wet. When you are resolved from the beginning, you will not be perplexed, though you will still get the same soaking. This understanding extends to everyhting

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Tsunetomo Yamamoto on bushido, zen, life, dragons, and spiritual warrior

In China there was once a man who liked pictures of dragons, and his clothing and furnishings were all designed accordingly. His deep affection for dragons was brought to the attention of the dragon god, and onde day a real dragon appeared before his window. It is said that he died of fright. He was probably a man who always spoke big words but acted differently when facing the real thing.

Tsunetomo Yamamoto

Source: The Hagakure

Contributed by: Laurens

A Quote by Zen Master on zen

in

I have discovered that it is necessary, absolutely necessary, to believe in nothing. 
That is, we have to believe in something which has no form and no color -
something which exists before all forms and colors appear. 
This is a very important point.  No matter what god or
doctrine you believe in, if you become attached to it, your belief will be based
more or less on a self-centered idea …. In constantly seeking to actualize
your ideal, you will have no time for composure.  But if you
are always prepared for accepting everything we see as something appearing from
nothing…. then at that moment you will have perfect composure

Shunriyo

Source: A Beginner's Mind

Contributed by: Praveer

A Quote by Takuan Soho on zen, mind, kufu, practice, experience, and bushido

We must know that it is not enough just to see what the Mind is, we must put into practice all that makes it up in our daily life. We may talk about it glibly, we may write books to explain it, but that is far from being enough. However much we may talk about water and describe it quite intelligently, that does not make it real water. So with fire. Mere talking of it will not make the mouth burn. To know what they are means to experience them in actual concreteness. A book on cooking will not cure our hunger. To feel satisfied we must have actual food. So long as we do not go beyond mere talking, we are not true knowers.

Takuan Soho (1573 - ?)

Source: Takuan's Letter to Yagyu Tajima No Kami Munenori on the Mystery of Prajna Immovable - as found in Daisetz T. Suzuki's book, Zen and Japanese Culture

Contributed by: Laurie

A Quote by Master Kosen Thibaut on zazen, zen, master dogen, and master kosen thibaut

When Master Dogen* (*lived in he 13th century, 51st successor of Buddha, and first true patriarch Zen in Japan) came back to Japan after travelling through China, he made some conferences. In Japan, Buddhism existed already, but Dogen said: "Only zazen* (*za = to sit, zazen = to sit in the posture of Zen) is important. All the Buddhistic decorations, the sutra's, the beliefs, the philosophy,..., all this is secondary. The decorations do not permit us to realize the true awakening of Buddha*..." (*Shakyamuni Buddha is the historical Buddha, but each person who realizes awakening in the posture of zazen, becomes Buddha)

Kosen Thibaut

Source: Zen - La Revolucion Interior, Pages: 1

Contributed by: Joeske

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