zen

A Quote by Adyashanti on adyashanti, zen, non-duality, light, mindlessness, and change

What if you let go of every bit of control and every urge that you have, right down to the most infinitesimal urge to control anything, anywhere, including anything that may be happening with you at this moment? If you were able to give up control absolutely, totally, and completely, then you would be a spiritually free being.

Adyashanti

Source: emptiness dancing

Contributed by: Asilentknight

A Quote by Adyashanti on adyashanti, zen, non-duality, light, mindlessness, and change

The light of consciousness has no mind to change or alter anything. When you start to see the light that you really are, the light waking up in you, the radiance, you realize it has no intention to change you. It has no intention to harmonize. It has no agenda. It just happens. The Truth is the only thing you'll ever run into that has no agenda. Everything else will have an agenda.

Adyashanti

Source: emptiness dancing

Contributed by: Evanoah

A Quote by Eihei Dogen on zen, tao, self, and study

To study the Way is to study the self, to study the self is to forget the self, to forget the self is to be enlightened by the ten thousand things.

Eihei Dogen

Contributed by: Chris

A Quote by Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse on zen, enlightenment, self, perception, and easy truth

Ultimately one must abandon the path to enlightenment. If you still define yourself as a Buddhist, you are not a buddha yet.

Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse

Source: What Makes You Not a Buddhist

Contributed by: Laurie

A Quote by Cheri Huber on ideas, insight, inspiration, zen, and depression

"An essential part of seeing clearly is finding the willingness to look closely and to go beyond our own ideas."

Cheri Huber

Source: The Depression Book: Depression as an Opportunity for Spiritual Growth

Contributed by: chase

A Quote by Shunryu Suzuki-roshi on zen, mind, and compassion

In the beginner's mind there is no thought, "I have attained something." All self-centered thoughts limit our vast mind. When we have no thought of achievement, no thought of self, we are true beginners. Then we can really learn something. The beginner's mind is the mind of compassion. When our mind is compassionate, it is boundless. Dogen-zenji, the founder of our school, always emphasized how important it is to resume our boundless original mind. Then we are always true to ourselves, in sympathy with all beings, and can actually practice.

Shunryu Suzuki-roshi (1905 - 1971)

Source: Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Shunryu Suzuki-roshi on zen, practice, mind, and enlightenment

So the most difficult thing is always to keep your beginner's mind. There is no need to have a deep understanding of Zen. Even though you read much Zen literature, you must read each sentence with a fresh mind. You should not say, "I know what Zen is," or "I have attained enlightenment." This is also the real secret of the arts: always be a beginner. Be very very careful about this point. If you start to practice zazen, you will begin to appreciate your beginner's mind. It is the secret of Zen practice.

Shunryu Suzuki-roshi (1905 - 1971)

Source: Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Shunryu Suzuki-roshi on zen and mind

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In Japan we have the phrase shoshin, which means "beginner's mind." The goal of practice is always to keep our beginner's mind. Suppose you recite the Prajna Paramita Sutra only once. It might be a very good recitation. But what would happen to you if you recited it twice, three times, four times, or more? You might easily lose your original attitude towards it. The same thing will happen in your other Zen practices. For a while you will keep your beginner's mind, but if you continue to practice one, two, three years or more, although you may improve some, you are liable to lose the limitless meaning of original mind.

Shunryu Suzuki-roshi (1905 - 1971)

Source: Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Shunryu Suzuki-roshi on zen and mind

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For Zen students the most important thing is not to be dualistic. Our "original mind" includes everything within itself. It is always rich and sufficient within itself. You should not lose your self-sufficient state of mind. This does not mean a closed mind, but actually an empty mind and a ready mind. If your mind is empty, it is always ready for anything; it is open to everything. In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities; in the expert's mind there are few.

Shunryu Suzuki-roshi (1905 - 1971)

Source: Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind

Contributed by: Siona

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