yielding

A Quote by Nancy Frankenberry on absence, buddhism, certainty, life, nostalgia, quality, religion, truth, and yielding

One may, with Hartshorne and other rationalist philosophers, press rationality to the point of postulating certain necessary truths for which we have no conceivable alternatives. Or, like Buddhist thinkers of many periods-and like Wieman, too-one may find in the very conditions of contingency a religious significance that informs the whole quality of life as lived. Contingency embraced without any nostalgia or yearning for necessary truth yields a different quality of life than contingency assented to as necessarily so in the absence of any conceivable alternative.

Nancy Frankenberry

Source: 1987

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lydia H. Sigoteney on cheating, children, darkness, desires, failure, garden, gold, heaven, indolence, pride, resignation, soul, vices, youth, and yielding

There came a man in days of old, To hire a piece of land for gold, And urged his suit in accents meek- "One crop alone is all I seek; 'That harvest o'er, my claim I yield, And to its lord resign the field." The owner some misgivings felt, And coldly with the stranger dealt, But found his last objection fail, And honied eloquence prevail, So took the proffered price in hand, And for one crop leased out the land. The wily tenant sneered with pride, And sowed the spot with acorns wide; At first like tiny shoots they grew, Then broad and wide their branches threw, But long before the oaks sublime, Aspiring reached their forest rime, The cheated landlord moldering lay Forgotten with his kindred clay. O ye whose years unfolding fair Are fresh with youth, and free from care, Should vice and indolence desire The garden of your souls to hire, No parleys hold-reject the suit, Nor let one seed the soil pollute. My child their first approach beware, With firmness break the insidious snare, Lest as the acorns grew and throve Into a sun-encircled grove, Thy sins, a dark o'ershadowing tree Shut out the light of Heaven from thee.

Lydia H. Sigoteney

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on corruption, custom, god, good, life, order, purity, soul, world, and yielding

The old order changeth, yielding place to new, And God fulfills himself in many ways, Lest one good custom should corrupt the world. Comfort thyself: what comfort is in me? I have lived my life, and that which I have done May he within himself make pure! but thou, If thou shouldst never see my face again, Pray for my soul. . . .

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Idylls of the King. The Passing of Arthur.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Leonardo da Vinci on change, mind, obstacles, and yielding

Obstacles cannot crush me. Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.

Leonardo da Vinci (1452 - 1519)

Source: The Notebooks, 1508–1518

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Count Leo Nikolaevich Tolstoi or Tolstoy on achievement, aim, art, conformity, correction, errors, history, hope, humanity, individuality, justice, laws, mathematics, mind, observation, problems, separation, solution, understanding, and yieldi

A modern branch of mathematics, having achieved the art of dealing with the infinitely small, can now yield solutions in other more complex problems of motion, which used to appear insoluble. This modern branch of mathematics, unknown to the ancients, when dealing with problems of motion, admits the conception of the infinitely small, and so conforms to the chief condition of motion (absolute continuity) and thereby corrects the inevitable error which the human mind cannot avoid when dealing with separate elements of motion instead of examining continuous motion. In seeking the laws of historical movement just the same thing happens. The movement of humanity, arising as it does from innumerable human wills, is continuous. To understand the laws of this continuous movement is the aim of history. Only by taking an infinitesimally small unit for observation (the differential of history, that is, the individual tendencies of man) and attaining to the art of integrating them (that is, finding the sum of these infinitesimals) can we hope to arrive at the laws of history.

Leo Tolstoy (1828 - 1910)

Source: War and Peace.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on overcoming, winning, yielding, and taoism

Though (the Tao) is uncreated itself, it creates all things. Because it has no substance, it can enter into where there is no space. Exercising by returning to itself, winning victories by remaining gentle and yielding, it is softer than anything, and therefore overcomes everything hard.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Hua Hu Ching, (68)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on confusion, emptiness, and yielding

Yield and overcome; Bend and be straight; Empty and be full; Wear out and be new; Have little and gain; Have much and be confused. ...The ancients say, "Yield and overcome." Is that an empty saying? Be really whole, And all things will come to you.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Tao Te Ching, (22)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on yielding and taoism

Yielding is the way of the Tao.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: The Tao Te Ching, (40)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lao Tzu on certainty, earth, excellence, men, strength, superiority, water, weakness, yielding, and taoism

A man's excellence is like that of water; It benefits all things without striving; It takes to the low places shunned by men. Water is akin to Tao. . . . In all the earth nothing weaker than water, Yet in attacking the hard, nothing superior, Nothing so certain in wearing down strength: There is no way to resist it. Note then: The weak conquer the strong, The yielding outlast the aggressors.

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Campbell on acceptance, achievement, adventure, conquest, courage, death, experience, fear, heroism, joy, life, and yielding

The conquest of the fear of death is the recovery of life's joy. One can experience an unconditional affirmation of life only when one has accepted death, not as contrary to life, but as an aspect of life. Life in its becoming is always shedding death, and on the point of death. The conquest of fear yields the courage of life. That is the cardinal initiation of every heroic adventure - fearlessness and achievement.

Joseph Campbell (1904 - 1987)

Contributed by: Zaady

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