work

A Quote by Jim Collins on questions, new year, resoltuion, business, passion, work, and flow

The start of the New Year is a perfect time to start a stop doing list and to make this the cornerstone of your New Year resolutions, be it for your company, your family or yourself. It also is a perfect time to clarify your three circles, mirroring at a personal level the three questions...

1) What are you deeply passionate about?
2) What are you are genetically encoded for -- what activities do you feel just "made to do"?
3) What makes economic sense -- what can you make a living at?

Those fortunate enough to find or create a practical intersection of the three circles have the basis for a great work life.

Jim Collins

Source: Jim Collins: Best New Year's Resolution? A 'stop doing' list: http://www.jimcollins.com/lib/articles.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Vicki Donlan on women, men, work, career, and business

During the Q&A periods after my speeches, it is the men who say to me, "Help me understand how I am going to balance my work and my family." Now, let me tell you why I believe they see it that way. Because when they look around the room, they see the women who are going to be in their lives, the choices they will have for a spouse. And they realize that these women are educated, ambitious, and have every intention of having careers of their own.

Being smart young men, they say to themselves, "I want to get married, have a family, and I understand my wife wants to work too. Do you, Vicki, know how to help us do that?" Because they're no longer looking at that prospective wife, saying, "Well this is wonderful, you're getting educated, but of course as soon as we get married, you're going to stay home and make babies."

Those days are long gone. But our corporations haven't caught up with it. Our law firms, our higher education system, and our medical institutions haven't figured out how this family policy is going to work. Men are tired of the 80- to 100-hour work week as well.

Vicki Donlan

Source: tompeters!: Cool Friends Interview with Vicki Donlan: http://www.tompeters.com/cool_friends/content.php?note=010092.php

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Barbara Ehrenreich on labor, work, and corporations

[Networking] feels "fake" because we know it involves the deflection of our natural human sociability to an ulterior end. Normally we meet strangers in the expectation that they may truly be strange, and are drawn to the multilayered mystery that each human presents. But in networking, as in prostitution, there is no time for fascination. The networker is always looking over the shoulder of the person she engages in conversation, toward whatever concrete advantage can be gleaned from the interaction-- a tip or a precious contact. This instrumentalism undermines the possibility of a group identity, say, as white-collar victims of corporate upheaval. No matter how crowded the room, the networker prowls alone, scavenging to meet his or her individual needs.  

Barbara Ehrenreich

Source: Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream, Pages: 62

Contributed by: aarons

A Quote by Barbara Ehrenreich on work, labor, corporate, new age, and skeptic

Among other things, [books by Bruce Doyle III and Mike Hernacki] explain the importance of the "winning attitude" I have been urged to adopt: a positive attitude "attracts" or "fulfils", depending on which author's weird science you go with, postiive results, with little or no action on your part required. Herein, too, lies the answer to the question I once posed ...: would it be enough just to fake a winning attitude? No way, according to Doyle:

'People who just pretend to have a positive attitude may be more acceptable, but they will still attract according to how they are really vibrating-- the energy they are emanating will attract their circumstances.'

The obvious liberal rejoinders come to mind: What about the child whose home is hit by a bomb? Did she have some bomb-shaped thoughtform that brought ruin down on her head? And did my [fired white-collar workers] boot-camp mates cause the layoffs that drove them out of their jobs by "vibrating" at a layoff-related frequency? It seems inexcusably cruel to tell people  who have reach some kind of personal nadir that their probem is entirely of their own making. ...

But from the point of view of the economic 'winners'-- those who occupy powerful and high-paying jobs-- the view that one's fate depends entirely on oneself must be remarkably convenient. It explains the winners' success in the most flattering terms while invalidating the complaints of the losers. Patrick's clients, for example, came to the boot camp prepared to blame their predicament on the economy, or the real estate market, or the inhuman corporate demands on their time. But these culprits were summarily dismissed in favor of alleged individual failings:depression, hesitation, lack of focus. It's not the world that needs changing, is the message, it's you. No need then, to band together to work for a saner economy or a a more human-friendly corporate environment, or to band together at all. 

Barbara Ehrenreich

Source: Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream, Pages: 84..85

Contributed by: aarons

A Quote by Barbara Ehrenreich on labor, work, and skeptic

Career coaches can perhaps be forgiven for using baseless personality tests [Myers-Briggs, Enneagrams, etc] to add a veneer of scientific respectability to the coaching process. But the tests enjoy wide credibility, not just among coaches, but among corporate decision makers. .. . So why is the corporate world, which we think of as so fixated on empirical, in fact quantifiable, measures of achievement like the "bottom line", so attached to these meaningless personality tests? One attraction must be that the tests lend a superficial rationality to the matching of people with jobs. ... Of course, if the function of the test is really ideological-- to promote the peg-in-hole theory of employment-- they do not have to be in any way accurate of predictors of performance of satisfaction. They serve more as underpinnings of corporate etiquette, allowing employers to rationalize rejection or dismissal in terms of an inadequate "fit". We believe that there is a unique slot for each person, the tests announce-- even though we may fail to find it in your particular case.

Barbara Ehrenreich

Source: Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream, Pages: 32..35

Contributed by: aarons

A Quote by Robert I. Sutton on respect, behavior, work, workplace, and abuse

The “No Asshole Rule” doesn’t allow anyone to get away with demeaning, nasty, or disrespectful behavior toward others in the workplace. People who continually behave that way need serious reform or should be shown the door.

The rule is needed because too many organizations allow such behavior to persist. For example, surveys show that one out of two Americans has an abusive boss. And one out of five or six people is in work relationships where they feel persistently, emotionally abused.

Assholes have devastating cumulative effects partly because nasty interactions have far more impact on us than positive ones—five times the punch, according to recent research. And it takes numerous encounters with positive people to offset the energy and happiness sapped by a single episode with one asshole.

The behavior of assholes damages individual well-being and also impacts corporate profits, mostly because it reduces people’s commitment to the organization and drives out some of the best employees.

Robert Sutton

Source: Meet the Masterminds: Robert Sutton on "The No Asshole Rule" for the Workplace: http://www.managementconsultingnews.com/interviews/sutton_interview.php

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Kahlil Gibran on work

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All work is empty save when there is love.

Kahlil Gibran (1883 - 1931)

Source: The Prophet p. 26 (On Work)

Contributed by: whoAmI?

A Quote by Frederick Neitzsche on entrepreneurship, work, and leisure

Whoever has not two-thirds of his time to himself, is a slave.

Frederick Neitzsche

Contributed by: Nur

A Quote by Robert Reich on work, employees, downsizing, workplace, and business

I think re-engineering or restructuring or downsizing or rightsizing or whatever you want to call it, it's basically firing, has gone way too far. Employees, as I've talked to them across the country, feel that they are not respected, they are not valued, they are worried about their jobs. They simply feel that the company is no longer loyal to them. Why should they be loyal to the company, they ask me. Why should I go the extra mile? Why should I care?

Robert Reich

Source: Frontline: Does America still work? http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/america/interviews/reich.html

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

A Quote by Van Jones on green, work, and jobs

Our point of view is, lets not be so elitist that we can't honor good, hard, dignified, ennobling work: people working with their hands, building things, putting up solar panels, weatherizing homes, working on organic agriculture, building wind farms. We don't have robots in society, so somebody has to do that work. Lets make sure that the people who can use that work get a chance to do it. I see that as a first step toward bigger and better things.

Van Jones

Source: The Green Options Interview: Van Jones: http://ryanthibodaux.greenoptions.com/2007/05/29/the-green-options-interview-van-jones/

Contributed by: ~C4Chaos

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