words

A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on facts and words

Man does not live by words alone, despite the fact that he sometimes has to eat them.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adlai Ewing Stevenson on action, age, earth, emotion, faith, knowledge, love, men, people, and words

What a man knows at 50 that he did not know at 20 is, for the most part, incommunicable. The knowledge he has acquired with age is not the knowledge of formulas, or forms of words, but of people, places, actions - a knowledge gained not by words but by touch, sight, sound, victories, failures, sleeplessness, devotion, love - the human experiences and emotions of this earth and of oneself and other men; and perhaps, too, a little faith, a little reverence for things one cannot see.

Adlai Stevenson (1900 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Adam Clarke on accidents, chance, ignorance, and words

There is no such thing as chance or accident; the words merely signify our ignorance of some real and immediate cause.

Adam Clarke (1762? - 1832)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on ideas and words

He can compress the most words into the smallest idea of any man I know.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on defense, government, loyalty, presidency, principles, war, and words

There is an important sense in which government is distinctive from administration. One is perpetual, the other is temporary and changeable. A man may be loyal to his government and yet oppose the particular principles and methods of administration. Attributed to Representative Abraham Lincoln. by W. T. Roche, address at Washington, Kansas, April 9, 1942: "These words were spoken by Lincoln, then a Congressman, in defense of his condemnation of President Polk for provoking the Mexican War."

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Congressional Record, April 15, 1942, vol. 88, Appendix, p. A1493.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on advice, decisions, determination, diaries, meetings, presidency, quotations, thought, war, wishes, and words

I have got you together to hear what I have written down. I do not wish your advice about the main matter - for that I have determined for myself. Attributed to President Abraham Lincoln. - Salmon P. Chase, diary entry for September 22, 1862, Diary and Correspondence of Salmon P Chase, p. 88 (1903, reprinted 1971). According to the Chase account, Lincoln spoke these words at a cabinet meeting he had called to inform the members of his decision to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. This quotation is also used in Carl Sandburg, Abraham Lincoln: The War Years, p. 584 (1939). Although these words are not used, the same thought is conveyed in the diary of another member of Lincoln's cabinet, Gideon Welles. See his diary entry for the same date in Diary of Gideon Welles, vol. 1, pp. 142-43 (1911).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Attributed

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on adversity, affliction, good, men, philosophy, poets, pride, prosperity, and words

It is said an Eastern monarch once charged his wise men to invent him a sentence, to be ever in view, and which should be true and appropriate in all times and situations. They presented him the words: 'And this, too, shall pass away.' How much it expresses! How chastening in the hour of pride! - how consoling in the depth of affliction! Many versions of this story exist. Another one is: "The Sultan asked for a Signet motto, that should hold good for Adversity or Prosperity. Solomon gave him, 'This also shall pass away.'" - Edward Fitzgerald, Polonius: A Collection of Wise Saws and Modern Instances, item 112, p. 80 (1901). The words In neez bogzarad, which can be translated, "This also shall pass," appear in the Diven of the twelfth century Persian poet and philosopher, Sana'I of Ghaznl, ed. Mazahir Musaffa, p. 92 (1957).

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 30, 1859.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, belief, cities, conversation, elections, freedom, god, injustice, prayer, presidency, privacy, slavery, speech, words, and work

I know there is a God, and that He hates injustice and slavery. I see the storm coming, and I know that His hand is in it. If he has a place and work for me - and I think He has - I believe I am ready. This comment was made in a private conversation with Newton Bateman, superintendent of public instruction for the state of Illinois, a few days before the election of 1860. During the election of 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy used the same words in a speech to the United Steelworkers of America convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, September 19, 1960. - Freedom of Communications, final report of the Committee on Commerce, United States Senate, part 1, p. 286 (1961). Senate Report. 87-994. As president, he used a variation of these words at the 10th annual presidential prayer breakfast, March 1, 1962. - Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F Kennedy, 1962, p. 176.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Attributed in. — Joseph Gilbert Holland, The Life of Abraham Lincoln,1886, Unverified.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, angels, nations, peace, presidency, success, vietnam, war, and words

I do the very best I know how - the very best I can; and I mean to keep doing so until the end. If the end brings me out all right, what is said against me won't amount to anything. If the end brings me out wrong, ten angels swearing I was right would make no difference. NOTE: President Richard M. Nixon used similar words about his plan for peace in an address to the nation on the war in Vietnam, November 3, 1969: "If it does succeed, what the critics say now won't matter. If it does not succeed, anything I say then won't matter." - Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: Richard Nixon, 1969, p. 909.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: President Abraham Lincoln. — Francis Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, 1867

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on anguish, fatherhood, freedom, grief, losing, love, memory, motherhood, presidency, pride, sacrifice, sons, war, weakness, and words

Dear Madam,-I have been shown in the files of the War Department a Statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts, that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle. I feel how weak and fruitless must be any words of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering to you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save. I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours, to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of Freedom. Yours, very sincerely and respectfully, President Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Letter to Mrs. Lydia Bixby, Nov. 21, 1864. Records later corrected: only two sons died.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content