wonder

A Quote by John Donne on country, love, and wonder

I wonder by my troth, what thou, and I Did, till we loved? were we not weaned till then? But sucked on country pleasures, childishly? Or snorted we in the seven sleepers' den?

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Good Morrow, st. I

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Burroughs on beauty, books, day, friendship, mind, wonder, and world

I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, and all the friends I want to see. The longer I live the more my mind dwells upon the beauty and the wonder of the world.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe on universe and wonder

I sometimes wonder whether our planet is the asylum of the universe for disordered minds.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749 - 1832)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jay W. Ingram on family, football, justice, life, psychology, science, scientists, tennis, thought, winning, wonder, and yielding

I once read that if the folds in the cerebral cortex were smoothed out it would cover a card table. That seemed quite unbelievable but it did make me wonder just how big the cortex would be if you ironed it out. I thought it might just about cover a family-sized pizza: not bad, but no card-table. I was astonished to realize that nobody seems to know the answer. A quick search yielded the following estimates for the smoothed out dimensions of the cerebral cortex of the human brain. An article in Bioscience in November 1987 by Julie Ann Miller claimed the cortex was a "quarter-metre square." That is napkin-sized, about ten inches by ten inches. Scientific American magazine in September 1992 upped the ante considerably with an estimate of 1 1/2 square metres; that's a square of brain forty inches on each side, getting close to the card-table estimate.' A psychologist at the University of Toronto figured it would cover the floor of his living room (I haven't seen his living room), but the prize winning estimate so far is from the British magazine New Scientist's poster of the brain published in 1993 which claimed that the cerebral cortex, if flattened out, would cover a tennis court. 'How can there be such disagreement?' How can so many experts not know how big the cortex is? I don't know, but I'm on the hunt for an expert who will say the cortex, when fully spread out, will cover a football field. A Canadian football field.

Jay W. Ingram

Source: The Burning House, Unlocking the Mysteries of the Brain Penguin Books, U.K., 1995

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Janet Flanner on inventions, love, men, suffering, understanding, war, women, and wonder

By jove, no wonder women don't love war nor understand it, nor can operate in it as a rule; it takes a man to suffer what other men have invented. . . .

Janet Flanner (1892 - 1978)

Source: Letter to Natalia Danesi Murray, 1944, Darlinghissima: Letters to a Friend, 1985.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by James G. Sinclair on doubt, people, and wonder

At times, it is better to keep your mouth shut and let people wonder if you're a fool than to open it and remove all doubt.

James G. Sinclair

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jacques Barzun on doubt, football, and wonder

To watch a football game is to be in a prolonged neurotic doubt as to what you're seeing. It's more like an emergency happening at a distance than a game. I don't wonder the spectators take to drink.

Jacques Barzun (1907 -)

Source: quoted in The Joy of Sports, 1976

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by J. Singer on knowledge and wonder

The longer the island of knowledge, the longer the shoreline of wonder.

J. Singer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by J. E. Littlewood on friendship, proof, wishes, and wonder

I read in the proof sheets of Hardy on Ramanujan: "As someone said, each of the positive integers was one of his personal friends." My reaction was, "I wonder who said that; I wish I had." In the next proof-sheets I read (what now stands), "It was Littlewood who said..."

J. E. Littlewood (1885 - 1977)

Source: A Mathematician's Miscellany, Methuen Co. Ltd, 1953.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by J. B. Phillips on apathy, doubt, facts, faith, feeling, imagination, learning, lies, men, patience, people, practice, prayer, preachers, religion, simplicity, spontaneity, thinking, thought, understanding, wonder, and words

The preacher and the writer may seem to have an... easy task. At first sight, it may seem that they have only to proclaim and declare; but in fact, if their words are to enter men's hearts and bear fruit, they must be the right words, shaped cunningly to pass men's defenses and explode silently and effectually within their minds. This means, in practice, turning a face of flint toward the easy cliché, the well-worn religious cant and phraseology - dear, no doubt, to the faithful, but utterly meaningless to those outside the fold. It means learning how people are thinking and how they are feeling; it means learning with patience, imagination and ingenuity the way to pierce apathy or blank lack of understanding. I sometimes wonder what hours of prayer and thought lie behind the apparently simple and spontaneous parables of the Gospel.

J. B. Phillips (1906 - 1982)

Source: Making Men Whole

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content