wives

A Quote by Marion D. Hanks on acceptance, babies, birth, certainty, college, creation, divinity, education, embarrassment, facts, failure, family, future, graduation, husbands, laws, learning, life, men, nobility, parenthood, poetry, potential, preparati

There is a story of a certain college student in a poetry class who, when called upon to recite lines that he had written by assignment, refused. He was prepared to accept failure rather than the embarrassment of facing the class, inept as he felt he was in this field. The professor, it is reported, said to him, "Young man, it is important that you realize that you arc not a finished product. You are still in the process of creation." In fact, all of us are in the process of creation. "Progress," said Browning in "Paracelsus," "is the law of life. Man is not man as yet." But men do have a divine heritage and we are here for noble purposes. We have an infinitely important future potential if, if we learn. How is it going to happen? Will it be automatic? You who are married, did the ceremony create you or qualify you as properly equipped husbands and wives? Does the birth of a baby into the family qualify you as adequate parents? Does graduation signify that we are educated ?

Marion D. Hanks (1921 -)

Source: at BYU, May 28, 1964 © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission..

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marie Antoinette on people and wives

Qu'ils mangent de la brioche. Let them eat cake. On being told that her people had no bread. Attributed to Marie-Antoinette, but remark is much older. Rousseau refers in his Confessions, 1740, to a similar remark, as a well-known saying. Others attribute the remark to the wife of Louis XIV.

Marie Antoinette (1755 - 1793)

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A Quote by Marie Antoinette on children, husbands, motherhood, suffering, and wives

Remark at the revolutionary tribunal, 14 October 1793. I was a queen, and you took away my crown; a wife, and you killed my husband; a mother, and you deprived me of my children. My blood alone remains: take it, but do not make me suffer long.

Marie Antoinette (1755 - 1793)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marcel Proust on christ, company, complaints, composers, day, fashion, feeling, force, ideas, jesus, logic, mind, mistakes, poetry, psychiatry, sanity, wives, and words

But this does not exempt the sane from a feeling of alarm when a madman who has composed a sublime poem, after explaining to them in the most logical fashion that he has been shut up by mistake through his wife's machinations, imploring them to intercede for him with the governor of the asylum, complaining of the promiscuous company that is forced upon him, concludes as follows: "You see that man in the courtyard, who I'm obliged to put up with; he thinks he's Jesus Christ. That should give you an idea of the sort of lunatics I've been shut up with: he can't be Jesus Christ, because I'm Jesus Christ!" A moment earlier, you were on the point of going to assure the psychiatrist that a mistake had been made. On hearing these words, even if you bear in mind the admirable poem at which this same man is working every day, you shrink from him. . . .

Marcel Proust (1871 - 1922)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Marcus Argentarius on death, earth, hope, immortality, lies, wisdom, and wives

Dead, you will lie under a yard of earth, Far from daylight and all delighting. So drain the cup; take your pleasures undiluted; Embrace that beautiful girl, your wife; And pin no hopes on "immortal wisdom": Cleanthes and Zeno lie as deep as any.

Marcus Argentarius

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on dance, death, defeat, earth, good, heaven, loneliness, losing, soul, tears, wine, and wives

The Gods on the death of his wife Yang Kai-hui I lost my proud poplar and you your willow As poplar and willow they soar straight up into the ninth heaven and ask the prisoner of the moon, Wu Kang' what is there. He offers them wine from the cassia tree. The lonely lady on the moon, Chang 0, spreads her vast sleeves and dances for these good souls in the unending sky. Down on earth a sudden report of the tiger's defeat. Tears fly down from a great upturned bowl of rain. May 11, 1957

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: The Poems of Mao Tse-tung, Harper & Row

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Major Sullivan Ballou on death, earth, love, spirit, and wives

To his wife, a week before his death in 1861, But, O Sarah! if the dead can come back to this earth and flit unseen around those they loved, I shall always be near you; In the gladdest days and in the darkest nights . . . always, always, and if there be a soft breeze upon your cheek, it shall be my breath, as the cool air fans your throbbing temple, it shall be my spirit passing by. Sarah do not mourn me dead; think I am gone and wait for thee, for we shall meet again.

Major Sullivan Ballou

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on ethics, love, poetry, and wives

From the poetry of Lord Byron they drew a system of ethics compounded of misanthropy and voluptuousness,-a system in which the two great commandments were to hate your neighbour and to love your neighbour's wife.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On Moore's Life of Lord Byron. 1830. (From His Essays.)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lord Lyttleton on brides and wives

How much the wife is dearer than the bride.

Lord Lyttleton (1709 - 1773)

Source: An Irregular Ode.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred, Lord TENNYSON on heaven and wives

From yon blue heaven above us bent, The grand old gardener and his wife Smile at the claims of long descent.

Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809 - 1892)

Source: Stanza 7.

Contributed by: Zaady

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