wit

A Quote by Jonathan Swift on flattery, food, maxims, men, schools, and wit

'T is an old maxim in the schools, That flattery 's the food of fools; Yet now and then your men of wit Will condescend to take a bit.

Jonathan Swift (1667 - 1745)

Source: Cadenus and Vanessa.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Milton on rhetoric and wit

Enjoy your dear wit and gay rhetoric, That hath so well been taught her dazzling fence.

John Milton (1608 - 1674)

Source: Comus. Line 790.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Dryden on children, innocence, and wit

Her wit was more than man, her innocence a child.

John Dryden (1631 - 1700)

Source: Elegy on Mrs. Killegrew, Line 70.

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A Quote by John Dryden on books, learning, nature, poets, seriousness, soul, and wit

He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. . . . He was naturally learn'd; he needed not the spectacles of books to read Nature; he looked inwards, and found her there. . . . He is many times flat, insipid; his comic wit degenerating in to clenches, his serious swelling into bombast. But he is always great, when some occasion is presented to him.

John Dryden (1631 - 1700)

Source: Essay of Dramatic Poesy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Dryden on wit

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A thing well said will be wit in all languages.

John Dryden (1631 - 1700)

Source: Essay of Dramatic Poesy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on death, love, sexes, and wit

The Phoenix riddle hath more wit By us, we two being one, are it. So to one neutral thing both sexes fit, We die and rise the same, and prove Mysterious by this love.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: The Canonization, st. 3

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Donne on confession, direction, doubt, earth, fatherhood, justice, losing, men, philosophy, sons, wit, and world

And new philosophy calls all in doubt, The element of fire is quite put out; The sun is lost, and the earth, and no man's wit Can well direct him where to look for it. And freely men confess that this world's spent, When in the planets, and the firmament They seek so many new; then see that this Is crumbled out again to his atomies. 'Tis all in pieces, all coherence gone; All just supply, and all relation: Prince, subject, Father, Son, are things forgot.

John Donne (1572 - 1631)

Source: An Anatomy of the World. The First Anniversary [first published 1611,]

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A Quote by Jean de La Bruyére on judgment, men, and wit

It is a sad thing when men have neither the wit to speak well, nor judgment to hold their tongues.

Jean de La Bruyere (1645 - 1696)

Source: today’s thought, newspaper clipping, Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jean de La Bruyére on authors, books, and wit

Making a book is a craft, as is making a clock; it takes more than wit to become an author.

Jean de La Bruyere (1645 - 1696)

Source: The Theophrastus of France, 1688.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Jane Brereton on strength, thought, wisdom, and wit

The picture placed the busts between Adds to the thought much strength; Wisdom and Wit are little seen, But Folly 's at full length.

Jane Brereton (1685 - 1740)

Source: On Beau Nash's Picture at full length between the Busts of Sir Isaac Newton and Mr. Pope.

Contributed by: Zaady

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