wit

A Quote by Thomas Carew on god, lies, thought, and wit

Here lies a King that ruled, as he thought fit The universal monarchy of wit; Here lies two flamens, and both those the best: Apollo's first, at last the true God's priest.

Thomas Carew (1595 - 1639)

Source: Elegy on the Death of Donne, 1633

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir William Davenant on abuse and wit

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It is the wit and policy of sin to hate those we have abused.

Sir William Davenant (1606 - 1668)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Philip Sidney on certainty, indifference, judgment, peace, sleep, wealth, and wit

Come, Sleep! O Sleep, the certain knot of peace, The baiting-place of wit, the balm of woe, The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release, Th' indifferent judge between the high and low.

Sir Philip Sidney (1554 - 1586)

Source: Sonnet XXXIX

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A Quote by Shaftesbury on rhetoric, sage, seriousness, suspicion, and wit

'T was the saying of an ancient sage (Gorgias Leontinus, apud Aristotle's "Rhetoric," lib. iii. c. 18), that humour was the only test of gravity, and gravity of humour. For a subject which would not bear raillery was suspicious; and a jest which would not bear a serious examination was certainly false wit.

Shaftesbury

Source: Essay on the Freedom of Wit and Humour, sect. 5.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on thought and wit

This man [Chesterfield], I thought, had been a Lord among wits; but I find he is only a wit among Lords.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: Life of Johnson (Boswell). Vol. ii. Chap. i. 1754.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Butler on shyness and wit

We grant, although he had much wit, He was very shy of using it.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Hudibras. Part i. Canto i. Line 45.

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A Quote by Samuel Butler on wit

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He knew what 's what, and that 's as high As metaphysic wit can fly.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Hudibras. Part i. Canto i. Line 149.

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A Quote by Samuel Butler on wit

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Neither have they hearts to stay, Nor wit enough to run away.

Samuel Butler (1612 - 1680)

Source: Hudibras, pt. 3, cto. 3.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Roger Bacon on body, excellence, mathematics, men, purity, remedies, respect, tennis, understanding, and wit

In the mathematics I can report no deficience, except that it be that men do not sufficiently understand the excellent use of the pure mathematics, in that they do remedy and cure many defects in the wit and faculties intellectual. For if the wit be too dull, they sharpen it; if too wandering, they fix it; if too inherent in the sense, they abstract it. So that as tennis is a game of no use in itself, but of great use in respect it maketh a quick eye and a body ready to put itself into all postures; so in the mathematics, that use which is collateral and intervenient is no less worthy than that which is principal and intended.

Roger Bacon (c. 1214 - c. 1294)

Source: John Fauvel and Jeremy Gray (eds.) A History of Mathematics: A Reader, Sheridan House, 1987.

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A Quote by Ray Stannard Baker on body, evil, facts, good, joy, life, pain, philosophy, reality, sorrow, soul, thinking, and wit

Did you think you could have the good without the evil? Did you think you could have the joy without the sorrow? . . . . I have been thinking much about pain. How could I help it? . . . . Sooner or later, regardless of the wit of man, we have pain to face; a reality; a final inescapable, immutable fact of life. What poor souls, if we have then no philosophy to face it with! This pain will not last; it never has lasted. I'll think about what I am going to write tomorrow-not about me, not about my body.

Ray Stannard Baker (1870 - 1946)

Contributed by: Zaady

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