wit

A Quote by Ambrose Gwinett Bierce on pride, providence, slang, speech, and wit

SLANG, n. The speech of one who utters with his tongue what he thinks with his ear, and feels the pride of a creator in accomplishing the feat of a parrot. A means (under Providence) of setting up as a wit without a capital of sense.

Ambrose Bierce (1842 - 1914)

Source: The Devil's Dictionary by Ambrose Bierce

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on children, manners, simplicity, and wit

Of manners gentle, of affections mild, In wit a man, simplicity a child.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Epitaph on Gay.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on art, genius, science, and wit

One science only will one genius fit: So vast is art, so narrow human wit.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part i. Line 60.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on nature, thought, and wit

True wit is Nature to advantage dress'd, What oft was thought, but ne'er so well express'd.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 97.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on happiness, style, and wit

What woeful stuff this madrigal would be, In some starved hackney sonneteer, or me! But let a lord once own the happy lines, How the wit brightens! how the style refines!

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: An Essay on Criticism, 1711, 1. 218

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on body, home, and wit

You beat your Pate, and fancy Wit will come: Knock as you please, there's no body at home.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on god, honesty, wit, and work

A wit 's a feather, and a chief a rod; An honest man 's the noblest work of God.

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Man. Epistle iv. Line 247.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alexander Pope on happiness, style, and wit

But let a lord once own the happy lines, How the wit brightens! how the style refines!

Alexander Pope (1688 - 1744)

Source: Essay on Criticism. Part ii. Line 220.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aldous Leonard Huxley on potential, sculpture, silence, wisdom, and wit

Silence is as full of potential wisdom and wit as the unhewn marble of great sculpture. The silent bear no witness against themselves.

Aldous Huxley (1894 - 1963)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alain René Lesage on memory, sons, and wit

On peut dire que son esprit brille aux dépens de sa mémoire (One may say that his wit shines by the help of his memory).

Alain Rene Lesage (1668 - 1747)

Source: Gil Blas, livre iii. chap. xi.

Contributed by: Zaady

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