weather

A Quote by Henry David Thoreau on heaven, justice, and weather

To watch this crystal globe just sent from heaven to associate with me. While these clouds and this somber drizzling weather shut all in, we two draw nearer and know one another.

Henry David Thoreau (1817 - 1862)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Heinrich Heine on art, church, nobility, understanding, and weather

The weather-cock on the church spire, though made of iron, would soon be broken by the storm-wind if it... did not understand the noble art of turning to every wind.

Heinrich Heine (1797 - 1856)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George H. Allen on inaction, mind, purity, water, and weather

Iron rusts from disuse, stagnant water loses its purity and in cold weather becomes frozen; even so does inaction sap the vigors of the mind.

George H. Allen (1922 - 1990)

Source: see Leonardo da Vinci

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Carlin on darkness and weather

Weather forecast for tonight: dark.

George Carlin

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Gary Apple on belief and weather

Can you believe the weather we are having? Cold, windy and damp . . . And I hear outdoors it's even worse.

Gary Apple

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederick Frye Rockwell on books, certainty, disappointment, imagination, rules, seasons, trouble, uncertainty, weather, and work

The gardener who imagines that his work can be reduced to a set of rules and formulae, followed and applied according to special days marked on the calendar, is but preparing himself for a double disappointment. Few things are so certain to be uncertain as the seasons and the weather; and these, rather than a set of dates, even for a single locality, form the signs which the real gardener follows. That is the great trouble with much book and magazine gardening.

Frederick Frye Rockwell

Source: Around the Year in the Garden, 1917

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Franklin Pierce Adams on weather

in

I am easily influenced. Compared with me a weather vane is Gibraltar.

Franklin Pierce Adams (1881 - 1960)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frank Koch on change, danger, darkness, time, and weather

Two battleships assigned to the training squadron had been at sea on maneuvers in heavy weather for several days. I was serving on the lead battleship and was on watch on the bridge as night fell. The visibility was poor with patchy fog, so the captain remained on the bridge keeping an eye on all activities. Shortly after dark, the lookout on the wing of the bridge reported, "Light, bearing on the starboard bow." "Is it steady or moving astern?" the captain called out. Lookout replied, "Steady, captain," which meant we were on a dangerous collision course with that ship. The captain then called to the signalman, "Signal that ship: We are on a collision course, advise you change course 20 degrees." Back came the signal, "Advisable for you to change course 20 degrees." The captain said, "Send, I'm a captain, change course 20 degrees." "I'm a seaman second class," came the reply. "You had better change course 20 degrees." By that time the captain was furious. He spat out, "Send, I'm a battleship. Change course 20 degrees." Back came the flashing light, "I'm a lighthouse." We changed course.

Frank Koch

Source: quoted by Stephen R.Covey, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Francis Bacon on government, justice, men, needs, religion, and weather

When any of the four pillars of government-religion, justice, counsel, and treasure-are mainly shaken or weakened, men had need to pray for fair weather.

Francis Bacon (1561 - 1626)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by F. Burton Howard on anger, apologies, automobiles, certainty, choice, christmas, cities, clarity, college, confusion, day, decisions, driving, family, fatherhood, good, history, home, jokes, journeys, kiss, laughter, life, losing, mountains, n

When I was in my first year of college at Logan, Utah, I bought an old car for a hundred dollars. I was eighteen and thought that I knew all about driving. It was Christmastime, and my parents were living on a ranch in Wyoming. I picked up my two grandmothers and took them to my parents' home for Christmas. We had a grand time there. When it was time to return to school, the weather had changed and the roads were treacherous. That morning as we were ready to leave, we held a family prayer in the living room. My father prayed that we would have a safe journey. After we had loaded my car with suitcases, blankets, tuna fish sandwiches, and a thermos bottle full of Postum, Dad walked out to the car and said, 'I want to talk to you.' We went over and stood by the fence. 'You have a very valuable cargo,' he said, nodding at my grandmothers. 'I want you to promise me that if the roads are bad and it's snowing when you get down to Lander, you won't go over South Pass. I want you to take the long way.' I promised him that I would. My parents kissed us good-bye, and we were on our way. We had nice weather until we got to Riverton; then it started to snow. By the time we got to Lander, it was snowing pretty hard. I remembered my promise, so when we came to the intersection where you turn to go up the mountain, I made a conscious turn to go the long way. I remember thinking then that it was going to take us five hours longer to get to Utah. I knew the road, and I was absolutely certain that I had made the right turn. As we drove along, we were joking and laughing, although the snow was getting thicker. Then I saw a sign that read, 'Historic Old South Pass City,' and I realized that I had somehow become confused in the snowstorm and had taken the wrong road! I thought, Dad will be angry with me! I don't know how this happened-it wasn't intentional. I had only two choices: I could keep on going, or I could turn around and go back. By this time, we were at the summit, so I decided that we might as well keep going and that I would apologize to Dad later. As we came down the mountain, the snow stopped and the roads were clear. We drove to Logan and then to Malad without any problems. On my way to school the next day I happened to see the front-page headline of a newspaper: WORST BLIZZARD OF THE YEAR STRANDS HUNDREDS IN CENTRAL WYOMING. I bought a paper, and it was full of stories about people who had been stranded, lost, or killed on the road that I had promised to take. I realized that the prayer our family had offered had been answered. I knew that the Lord had gotten us on the right road, and I realized how He had protected us. I was never the same after that.

F. Burton Howard (1933 -)

Source: © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

Syndicate content