weather

A Quote by unknown on weather

in

By all these lovely tokens September days are here With summer's best of weather And autumn's best of cheer.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on criticism and weather

All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on politicians, principles, quiet, and weather

A local politician was once enmeshed in his own oratory. Said he: "Build a chain-link fence around the winter's supply of summer weather; skim the clouds from the sky with a teaspoon; catch a thundercloud in a saucepan; break a hurricane to harness; quiet and soothe an earthquake; lasso an avalanche; pin a napkin on the crater of an active volcano-but never expect to see me false to my principles."

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on fate, marriage, and weather

Only a fool predicts the fate of a marriage, you can do better with the weather.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on blessings, day, judgment, motherhood, weather, and wisdom

On a gloomy, rainy morning, it came little eight-year-old Tommy's turn to say the blessing at breakfast. "We thank Thee for this beautiful day," he prayed. His mother asked him why he said that when the day was anything but beautiful. "Mother," said he, with rare wisdom, "never judge a day by its weather."

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on death, journeys, justice, time, and weather

A cold coming we had of it, Just the worst time of the year For a journey, and such a long journey: The ways deep and the weather sharp, The very dead of winter.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Source: Journey of the Magi

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on birth, bitterness, cities, darkness, dawn, death, doubt, emptiness, horses, information, journeys, justice, lies, men, people, regret, sleep, thought, time, travel, water, weather, wine, and women

Journey of the Magi "A cold coming we had of it, Just the worst time of the year For a journey, and such a long journey: The ways deep and the weather sharp, The very dead of winter." And the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory, Lying down in the melting snow. There were times we regretted The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces, And the silken girls bringing sherbet. Then the camel men cursing and grumbling And running away, and wanting their liquor and women, And the night-fires going out, and the lack of shelters, And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly And the villages dirty and charging high prices: A hard time we had of it. At the end we preferred to travel all night, Sleeping in snatches, With the voices singing in our ears, saying That this was all folly. Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley, Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation, With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness, And three trees on the low sky. And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow. Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the lintel, Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver, And feet kicking the empty wine-skins. But there was no information, and so we continued And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon Finding the place; it was (you may say) satisfactory. All this was a long time ago, I remember, And I would do it again, but set down This set down This: were we led all that way for Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly, We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and death, But had thought they were different; this Birth was Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death. We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation, With an alien people clutching their gods. I should be glad of another death.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steven Wright on weather

in

The Bermuda Triangle got tired of warm weather. It moved to Alaska. Now Santa Claus is missing.

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Walter Scott on brides, children, day, death, earth, emotion, motherhood, weakness, weather, wives, world, and youth

Upon the death of his wife: May 16 [1826]- She died at nine in the morning, after being ill for two days-easy at last. I arrived here late last night. For myself, I scarce know how I feel - sometimes as firm as the Bass Rock, sometimes as weak as the waters that break on it. . . . May 18- Another day, and a bright one to the external world, again opens on us; the air soft, and the flowers smiling, and the leaves glittering. They cannot refresh her to whom mild weather was a natural enjoyment. Cerements of lead and wood already hold her; cold earth must have her soon. But it is not my Charlotte, it is not the bride of my youth, the mother of my children, that will be laid among the ruins of Cryburgh, which we have so often visited in gaiety and pastime. No, no. She is sentient and conscious of my emotions somewhere- somehow; where we cannot tell - how we cannot tell; yet would I not this moment renounce her in a better world, for all that this world can give me.

Sir Walter Scott (1771 - 1832)

Source: journal

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ryokan on birds, dreams, and weather

Someday I'll be a weather-beaten skull resting on a grass pillow, Serenaded by a stray bird or two. Kings and commoners end up the same, No more enduring than last night's dream.

Ryokan (1758 - 1831)

Contributed by: Zaady

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