vulgarity

A Quote by William Somerset Maugham on belief, country, elderly, friendship, god, people, praise, religion, and vulgarity

When I was young I had an elderly friend who used often to ask me to stay with him in the country. He was a religious man and he read prayers to the assembled household every morning. But he had crossed out in pencil all the passages that praised God. He said that there was nothing so vulgar as to praise people to their faces and, himself a gentleman, he could not believe that God was so ungentlemanly as to like it.

William Somerset Maugham (1874 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on familiarity and vulgarity

Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 3. 1602

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, death, duty, earth, fatherhood, faults, grief, heart, heaven, impatience, losing, love, mind, nature, nobility, obligation, reason, simplicity, sons, sorrow, understanding, vulgarity, and world

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet, To give these mourning duties to your father: But, you must know, your father lost a father; That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound In filial obligation for some term To do obsequious sorrow: but to persever In obstinate condolement is a course Of impious stubbornness; 'tis unmanly grief; It shows a will most incorrect to heaven, A heart unfortified, a mind impatient, An understanding simple and unschool'd: For what we know must be and is as common As any the most vulgar thing to sense, Why should we in our peevish opposition Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature, To reason most absurd: whose common theme Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried, From the first corse till he that died to-day, 'This must be so.' We pray you, throw to earth This unprevailing woe, and think of us As of a father: for let the world take note, You are the most immediate to our throne; And with no less nobility of love Than that which dearest father bears his son, Do I impart toward you.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on adoption, blessings, borrowing, character, day, entertainment, familiarity, farewells, friendship, generosity, habits, judgment, memory, seasons, soul, thought, and vulgarity

And these few precepts in thy memory Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, Nor any unproportion'd thought his act. Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar; The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel; But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatch'd, unfledg'd comrade. Beware Of entrance to a quarrel; but, being in, Bear't that th' opposed may beware of thee. Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy; For the apparel oft proclaims the man, And they in France of the best rank and station Are most select and generous, chief in that. Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry, This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man. Farewell; my blessing season this in thee!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet (Folger Shakespeare Library), Pages: Act I Scene iii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas S. Monson on christ, colors, god, jesus, jokes, language, vulgarity, and words

How you speak and the words you use tell much about the image you choose to portray. Use language to build and uplift those around you. Profane, vulgar, or crude language and inappropriate or off-color jokes are offensive to the Lord. Never misuse the name of God or Jesus Christ. The Lord said, "Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain" (Ex. 20:7).

Thomas S. Monson (1927 -)

Source: Friend December, 1990, “They Spoke to Us” © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc.Used by permission.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Gray on fate, good, limits, and vulgarity

Beyond the limits of a vulgar fate, Beneath the good how far,-but far above the great.

Thomas Gray (1716 - 1771)

Source: The Progress of Poesy. III. Line 16.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on dreams, mistakes, persecution, and vulgarity

Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

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A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on vulgarity

Speak with the vulgar, think with the wise.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on manners, time, and vulgarity

Manners require time, as nothing is more vulgar than haste.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Oscar Fingall O'Flahertie Wills Wilde on kindness and vulgarity

I dislike arguments of any kind. They are always vulgar, and often convincing.

Oscar Wilde (1854 - 1900)

Contributed by: Zaady

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