virtue

A Quote by Blaise Pascal on effort, power, and virtue

The power of man's virtue should not be measured by his special efforts, but by his ordinary doings.

Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bill Davidsen on reward, stupidity, and virtue

Stupidity, like virtue, is its own reward

Bill Davidsen

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A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on belief, choice, clarity, confession, decisions, impossibility, inclusion, language, logic, problems, questions, sharing, truth, virtue, work, and writers

It seems clear that there must be some way of defining logic otherwise than in relation to a particular logical language. The fundamental characteristic of logic, obviously, is that which is indicated when we say that logical propositions are true in virtue of their form. The question of demonstrability cannot enter in, since every proposition which, in one system, is deduced from the premises, might, in another system, be itself taken as a premise. If the proposition is complicated, this is inconvenient, but it cannot be impossible. All the propositions that are demonstrable in any admissible logical system must share with the premises the property of being true in virtue of their form; and all propositions which are true in virtue of their form ought to be included in any adequate logic. Some writers, for example Carnap in his "Logical Syntax of Language," treat the whole matter as being more a matter of linguistic choice than I can believe it to be. In the above mentioned work, Carnap has two logical languages, one of which admits the multiplicative axiom and the axiom of infinity, while the other does not. I cannot myself regard such a matter as one to be decided by our arbitrary choice. It seems to me that these axioms either do, or do not, have the characteristic of formal truth which characterises logic, and that in the former event every logic must include them, while in the latter every logic must exclude them. I confess, however, that I am unable to give any clear account of what is meant by saying that a proposition is "true in virtue of its form." But this phrase, inadequate as it is, points, I think, to the problem which must be solved if an adequate definition of logic is to be found.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: the Introduction to the second edition of The Principles of Mathematics, Russell

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A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on virtue

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To be proud of virtue is to poison oneself with the antidote.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

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A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on belief, habits, and virtue

I believe long habits of virtue have a sensible effect on the countenance.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

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A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on emptiness, poverty, spirit, and virtue

Poverty often deprives a man of all spirit and virtue; it is hard for an empty bag to stand upright.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

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A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on time and virtue

There was never yet a truly great man that was not at the same time truly virtuous.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

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A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on happiness, health, and virtue

Be sober and temperate, and you will be healthy. Be in general virtuous, and you will be happy.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

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A Quote by Benjamin Franklin on happiness and virtue

Be in general virtuous, and you will be happy.

Benjamin Franklin (1706 - 1790)

Source: On Early Marriages, Writings

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A Quote by Ben Jonson on fortune and virtue

Minds that are great and free, should not on fortune pause: 'Tis crown enough to virtue still, her own applause.

Ben Jonson

Source: An Ode to Himself

Contributed by: Zaady

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