violence

A Quote by Malcolm X on violence, nonviolence, and self-defense

"We are nonviolent with people who are nonviolent with us."

Malcolm X (1925 - 1965)

Source: http://www.cmgww.com/historic/malcolm/about/quotes_by.htm

Contributed by: LaTanya

A Quote by Robert Francis Kennedy on economics, children, health, violence, nuclear weapons, nature, and values

Too much and too long, we seem to have surrendered community excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things. Our gross national product...if we should judge American by that - counts air pollution and cigarette advertising, and ambulances to clear our highways of carnage. It counts special locks for our doors and the jails for those who break them. It counts the destruction of our redwoods and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic sprawl. It counts napalm and the cost of a nuclear warhead, and armored cars for police who fight riots in our streets. It counts Whitman's rifle and Speck's knife, and the television programs which glorify violence in order to sell toys to our children.

Yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education, or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages; the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials. It measures neither our wit nor our courage; neither our wisdom nor our learning; neither our compassion nor our devotion to our country; it measures everything, in short, except that which makes life worthwhile. And it tells us everything about America except why we are proud that we are Americans.

Robert F. Kennedy (1925 - 1968)

Source: Address, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, March 18, 1968.

Contributed by: Joshua

A Quote by Mr. on peace, war, violence, and stocks

Declare peace. It is time to heal all things war's torn to shreds. Decalre peace. We shall not take stock in violence ever again.

Mr. Prophet

Source: Song: "Decalre Peace" by Mr. Prophet

Contributed by: Mr.

A Quote by Derrick Jensen on violence, aggression, environment, sex, and intimacy

But violence does not equal aggression, and our sex need not follow our mistaken model of violence. There are, after all, different kinds of violence. There is the necessary violence of survival, of the killing of one's food, whether that food is lettuce, onion, duck, or deer. Then there are senseless forms of violence so often perpetuated by our culture: child abuse, rape, military or economic genocide, factory farms, industrial forestry, commercial fishing. But violence also can be like sex: a sacramental, beautiful,  and sometimes bittersweet interaction.

Derrick Jensen

Source: A Language Older Than Words, Pages: 35

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Michael Jackson, 1940 on violence, pleasure in violence, suffering, torture, retribution, nietsche, and logic of violence

In 1967, not long after the outbreak of civil war in Nigeria, the federal wuthorities arrested poet and playwright Wole Soyinka and imprisoned him without trial. In solitary confinement, summoning all his resources to stay alive, the thought occured to Soyinka that "some (albeit warped) logic is involved in acts of inhumanity." But how is one to understand this logic? All violence is a form of retribution. A form of payback, driven by the need to reclaim something that one imagines to have been wrongfully taken, that one is now owed. One's very existence is felt to depend on making good this loss-- a legacy stolen, a promise broken, a loved one murdered, one's honor impugned, a dream betrayed. Often, these existential wounds are so deep and degrading that material indemnification is considered inadequate. The injured party demands satiisfaction, and this, as Nietzsche observed, commonly involves punishment inflicted on the debtor's body-- by branding, amputation, rape, and mutilation. (citation and notes) The logic of this kind of exchange, Nietzsche writes, restson the fact that "instead of money, land, possessions of whatever sort,) a sort of pleasure is conceded to the creditor as a form of repayment and recompense-- the pleasure of being able to vent his power without a second thought on someone who is powerless, the enjoyment "de faire le mal pour le plaisir de le faire," the pleasure of violation." connects to Nazis, RUF

Michael Jackson

Source: In Sierra Leone, Pages: 155

Contributed by: jess

A Quote by Michael Jackson on war, violence, hannah arendt, terrorism, sierra leone, and west africa

Unless one has been caught up in a war and experienced the terror that comes of knowing that thousands of heavily armed individuals are bent on one's annihilation, it is hard to realize that most violence is not primarily motivated by evil, greed, lust, ideology, or agresssion. Stranges as it may seem, most violence is defensive. it is notivated by the fear that if one does not kill one ill be killed. Either by the enemy or by one's own superiors. Against this constant anxiety, and the acute sense of fear and vulnerabilty that accompanies it, one conjures an illusion of power-- torching buildings, shooting unarmed civilians, firing rocket grentades, smoking cannabis, shouting ordrs, changing slogans, seeing oneself as Rambo, taunting, torturing, and abusing the individuals one has taken captive. But all this display of might-- this weaponry, thse medicines and amulets, this noise, these incantations, both political and magical, these Hollywood images, these drug-induced fuges, these rituals of brotherhood and solidarity -- simply reveal the depth of oen's own impotence and fear. This is Hannah Arendt's great insight-- that while military power consolidates itself in numbers, and in coordinated, automatic forms of mass movement, terrorism seeks power in implements, and is driven not by might but by its absence. And so it is that in the auto-da-fe, with explosions and bomb blasts, fire, noise, and mayhem, that the terrorist, like a child, finds his apotheosis, achieving the recognition, presence, voice and potency he has been denied in the real world.

Michael Jackson

Source: In Sierra Leone, Pages: 39

Contributed by: jess

A Quote by Michael Jackson, 1940 on why we fight, violence, humanity, human beings, animals, sierra leone, west africa, war, violators, why we suffer, love, identity, honor, prestige, and wealth

LIke any other animal, human beings will fight to the death when threatened or cornered, but as a species we are perhaps alone in imagining that our survival depends on such elusive properties as recognition, love, identity, honor, prestige, and wealth. Only we will feel that our very existence is endangered when our name is taken in vain, our pride is hurt, our nation threatned, our reputation impugned, our voice ignored, our loyalty betrayed. No other animal will figh t tooth and nail, not only to see that such symbolic losses are made good, but that those hwo have allegedly taken these things fro us are themselves subject to all the torment, degradation, and loss that we have suffered at their hands. This is why violators seldom admit to guilt. For they believe they were fully justified in their excesses; they were only taking back what was rightfully theirs, preserving their civilization, defending their rights, upholding their honor, and, of course, obeying orders from above.

Michael Jackson

Source: In Sierra Leone, Pages: 39

Contributed by: jess

A Quote by Michael Jackson on war, violence, hannah arendt, terrorism, sierra leone, and west africa

Unless one has been caught up in a war and experienced the terror that comes of knowing that thousands of heavily armed individuals are bent on one's annihilation, it is hard to realize that most violence is not primarily motivated by evil, greed, lust, ideology, or agresssion. Stranges as it may seem, most violence is defensive. it is notivated by the fear that if one does not kill one ill be killed. Either by the enemy or by one's own superiors. Against this constant anxiety, and the acute sense of fear and vulnerabilty that accompanies it, one conjures an illusion of power-- torching buildings, shooting unarmed civilians, firing rocket grentades, smoking cannabis, shouting ordrs, changing slogans, seeing oneself as Rambo, taunting, torturing, and abusing the individuals one has taken captive. But all this display of might-- this weaponry, thse medicines and amulets, this noise, these incantations, both political and magical, these Hollywood images, these drug-induced fuges, these rituals of brotherhood and solidarity -- simply reveal the depth of oen's own impotence and fear. This is Hannah Arendt's great insight-- that while military power consolidates itself in numbers, and in coordinated, automatic forms of mass movement, terrorism seeks power in implements, and is driven not by might but by its absence. And so it is that in the auto-da-fe, with explosions and bomb blasts, fire, noise, and mayhem, that the terrorist, like a child, finds his apotheosis, achieving the recognition, presence, voice and potency he has been denied in the real world.

Michael Jackson

Source: Walking Meditation: The Experience of Peace in Every Step, Pages: 10

Contributed by: Joy Bringer

A Quote by Robert Francis Kennedy on action, beginning, belief, discovery, earth, ignorance, injustice, men, misery, protestantism, thought, violence, women, work, and world

Some believe there is nothing one man or one woman can do against the enormous array of the world's ills -- against misery, against ignorance, or injustice and violence. Yet many of the world's great movements, of thought and action, have flowed from the work of a single man. A young monk began the Protestant reformation, a young general extended an empire from Macedonia to the borders of the earth, and a young woman reclaimed the territory of France. It was a young Italian explorer who discovered the New World, and 32 year old Thomas Jefferson who proclaimed that all men are created equal. 'Give me a place to stand,' said Archimedes, 'and I will move the world.' These men moved the world, and so can we all.

Robert F. Kennedy (1925 - 1968)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Martin Luther King, Jr. on fear, habits, humanity, injustice, nations, poverty, power, problems, violence, war, and weapons

We have ancient habits to deal with, vast structures of power, indescribably complicated problems to solve. But unless we abdicate our humanity altogether and succumb to fear and impotence in the presence of the weapons we have ourselves created, it is as possible and as urgent to put an end to war and violence between nations as it is to put an end to poverty and racial injustice.

Martin Luther King Jr (1929 - 1968)

Contributed by: Zaady

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