vanity

A Quote by George Eliot on indifference, love, tenderness, and vanity

Vanity is as ill at ease under indifference as tenderness is under a love which it cannot return.

George Eliot (1819 - 1880)

Source: Daniel Deronda, bk. 1, ch. 10, 1876.

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A Quote by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche on action, extremism, fear, habits, and vanity

One will rarely err if extreme actions be ascribed to vanity, ordinary actions to habit, and mean actions to fear.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 - 1900)

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A Quote by Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche on action, extremism, fear, habits, and vanity

One will not go wrong if one attributes extreme actions to vanity, average ones to habit, and petty ones to fear.

Friedrich Nietzsche (1844 - 1900)

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A Quote by Ezra Pound on courage, grace, inventions, learning, order, vanity, and world

The ant's a centaur in his dragon world. Pull down thy vanity, it is not man Made courage, or made order, or made grace, Pull down thy vanity, I say pull down. Learn of the green world what can be thy place In scaled invention or true artistry, Pull down thy vanity, Paquin pull down! The green casque has outdone your elegance.

Ezra Pound (1885 - 1972)

Source: Cantos, 1925—1959,

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A Quote by Eric Hoffer on coaching, fear, and vanity

The real persuaders are our appetites, our fears and above all our vanity. The skillful propagandist stirs and coaches these internal persuaders.

Eric Hoffer (1902 - 1983)

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A Quote by Ellen Glasgow on vanity

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Tilling the fertile soil of man's vanity.

Ellen Glasgow (1874 - 1945)

Source: A Certain Measure, 1943

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A Quote by Edward O. Sisson on admiration, character, conceit, danger, desires, idealism, losing, respect, self-esteem, self-respect, vanity, and worth

Self-respect is the very cement of character, without which character will not form nor stand; a personal ideal is the only possible foundation for self-respect, without which self-respect degenerates into vanity or conceit, or is lost entirely, its place being taken by worthlessness and the consciousness of worthlessness; and that is the end of all character. It is often said that if we do not respect ourselves no one else will respect us; this is rather a dangerous way to put it; let us rather say that if we are not worthy of our own respect we cannot claim the respect of others. True self-respect is a matter of being and never of mere seeming. As Paulsen says, "It is vanity that desires first of all to be seen and admired, and then, if possible, really to be something; whereas proper self esteem desires first of all to be something, and' then, if possible, to have its worth recognized."

Edward O. Sisson

Source: The Essentials of Character, The Macmillan Company, 1915

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A Quote by Edmond Rostand on compromise, cowardice, emptiness, enemies, falsehood, fighting, prejudice, and vanity

It is coming... I feel Already shod with marble... gloved with lead... Let the old fellow come now! He shall find me On my feet sword in hand [ He draws his sword. ] I can see him there he grins He is looking at my nose that skeleton What's that you say? Hopeless? Why, very well! But a man does not fight merely to win! No, no, better to know one fights in vain! ... You there, Who are you? A hundred against one I know them now, my ancient enemies [ He lunges at the empty air. ] Falsehood! ... There! There! Prejudice Compromise Cowardice [ Thrusting ] What's that? No! Surrender? No! Never never! ... Ah, you too, Vanity! I know you would overthrow me in the end No! I fight on! I fight on! I fight on!

Edmond Rostand (1868 - 1918)

Source: Death scene spoken by Cyrano, Cyrano de Bergerac

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A Quote by Edmond Rostand on compromise, cowardice, emptiness, enemies, falsehood, fighting, prejudice, and vanity

It is coming. . . . I feel Already shod with marble . . . gloved with lead. . . . Let the old fellow come now! He shall find me On my feet sword in hand [ He draws his sword. ] I can see him there he grins He is looking at my nose that skeleton. What's that you say? Hopeless? Why, very well! But a man does not fight merely to win! No no better to know one fights in vain! . . . You there. Who are you? A hundred against one I know them now, my ancient enemies. [ He lunges at the empty air. ] Falsehood! . . . There! There! Prejudice. Compromise. Cowardice. [ Thrusting ] What's that? No! Surrender? No! Never never! . . . Ah, you too, Vanity! I know you would overthrow me in the end. No! I fight on! I fight on! I fight on!

Edmond Rostand (1868 - 1918)

Source: spoken by Cyrano de Bergerac

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A Quote by François, Duc de La Rochefoucauld on vanity

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When not prompted by vanity, we say little.

Duc de La Rochefoucauld (1613 - 1680)

Source: Réflexions ou Sentences et Maximes Morales

Contributed by: Zaady

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