value

A Quote by Dr. W. Edwards Deming on aim, clarity, future, judgment, life, planning, and value

It is important that an aim never be defined in terms of activity or methods. It must always relate directly to how life is better for everyone. . . . The aim of the system must be clear to everyone in the system. The aim must include plans for the future. The aim is a value judgment.

W. Edwards Deming (1900 - 1993)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Viktor E. Frankl on brothers, camping, children, commitment, destruction, existence, family, fatherhood, hunger, life, losing, love, meaning, memory, motherhood, possessions, sister, suffering, suicide, talent, time, value, wives, and worth

Allport, Gordon W., in his preface to Man's Search for Meaning: "WHY DO YOU NOT COMMIT SUICIDE?" Dr. Frankl asks his patients. . . . in one life there is love for one's children to tie to; in another life, a talent to be used; in a third, perhaps only lingering memories worth preserving. . . . As a long-time prisoner in bestial concentration camps he [Viktor Frankl] found himself stripped to naked existence. His father, mother, brother, and his wife died in camps or were sent to gas ovens, so that, excepting for his sister, his entire family perished in these camps. How could he - every possession lost, every value destroyed, suffering from hunger, cold and brutality, hourly expecting extermination - how could he find life worth preserving?

Viktor Frankl (1905 - 1997)

Source: Preface by Gordon W. Allport to Man’s Search for Meaning, Simon and Schuster, NY, 1963, p. 127.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Viktor E. Frankl on deed, life, meaning, suffering, and value

We can discover this meaning in life in three different ways: (1) by doing a deed; (2) by experiencing a value; and (3) by suffering.

Viktor Frankl (1905 - 1997)

Source: Dr. Victor E. Frankl in Man’s Search for Meaning, Simon and Schuster, NY, 1963, p. 176.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on computers, endings, seriousness, speech, and value

The breadth of the [Communications Decency Act's] coverage is wholly unprecedented.... The scope of the CDA is not limited to commercial speech or commercial entities. Its open ended prohibitions embrace all nonprofit entities and individuals posting indecent messages or displaying them on their own computers in the presence of minors. The general, undefined terms "indecent" and "patently offensive" cover large amounts of nonpornographic material with serious educational or other value.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997 Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on day, sacred, understanding, and value

A worm is the gardener's unpaid helper. Worms can eat up to one third of their bodyweight in a day. Some earthworms may live as long as eight years. Worms can live near the surface of the soil or even down to twelve feet below ground. Worms can move objects up to fifty times their own weight. The value of worms was understood by the ancients; it is said that Cleopatra of Egypt celebrated them as sacred in 50 B.C.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on body, clarity, gold, heart, purity, security, truth, value, and worth

Three things have value and worth supreme; A body that is strong, sound and clean; A brain that is clear and holds truth secure; And a heart that is pure, as gold is pure!

unknown

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on rest, value, and world

If you really do put a small value upon yourself, rest assured that the world will not raise your price.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on effort and value

To value ourselves, we must feel that our efforts are valued by others.

unknown

Source: Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on value

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One minute of do it now, is of more value than ages of put it off.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on community, control, difficulty, inclusion, life, pollution, service, value, water, and worth

It is difficult to place a monetary value on the many vital services that trees provide. However, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection calculates that a single tree that lives for fifty years will contribute service worth nearly $200,000 (in 1994 dollars) to the community during its lifetime. This includes providing oxygen ($31,250), recycling water and regulating humidity ($37,000), controlling air pollution ($62,500), producing protein ($2,500), providing shelter for wildlife ($31,250), and controlling land erosion and fertilizing the soil ($31,250).

unknown

Source: Sacred Trees

Contributed by: Zaady

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