understanding

A Quote by Ayn Rand on action, affection, complaints, defense, desires, expectation, facts, hatred, hope, indifference, insanity, justice, love, reason, struggle, suspicion, thought, understanding, wealth, wishes, and words

What did they seek from him? What were they after? He had never asked anything of them; it was they who wished to hold him, they who pressed a claim on him - and they seemed to have the form of affection, but it was a form which he found harder to endure than any sort of hatred. He despised causeless affection, just as he despised unearned wealth. They professed to love him for some unknown reason and they ignored all the things for which he could wish to be loved. He wondered what response they could hope to obtain from him in such manner - if his response was what they wanted. And it was, he thought; else why those constant complaints, those unceasing accusations about his indifference? Why that chronic air of suspicion, as if they were waiting to be hurt? He had never had a desire to hurt them, but he had always felt their defensive, reproachful expectation; they seemed wounded by anything he said, it was not a matter of his words or actions, it was almost . . . almost as if they were wounded by the mere fact of his being. Don't start imagining the insane - he told himself severely, struggling to face the riddle with the strictest of his ruthless sense of justice. He could not condemn them without understanding; and he could not understand.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 42-3)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ayn Rand on chaos, concern, desires, effort, failure, honesty, learning, listening, motives, order, rules, soul, understanding, and world

I am speaking to those among you who have retained some sovereign shred of their soul, unsold and unstamped: '- to the order of others'. If, in the chaos of the motives that have made you listen to the radio tonight, there was an honest, rational desire to learn what is wrong with the world, you are the man whom I wished to address. By the rules and terms of my code, one owes a rational statement to those whom it does concern and who are making an effort to know. Those who are making an effort to fail to understand me, are not a concern of mine.

Ayn Rand (1905 - 1982)

Source: (Atlas 981)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ashleigh Brilliant on understanding

I don't understand you. You don't understand me. What else do we have in common?

Ashleigh Brilliant (1933 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Arthur H. Stainback, D.D. on caring, compassion, criticism, individuality, understanding, and value

The value of compassion cannot be over-emphasized. Anyone can criticize. It takes a true believer to be compassionate. No greater burden can be born by an individual than to know no one cares or understands.

Arthur H. Stainback

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aristotle on understanding

Those that know, do. Those that understand, teach.

Aristotle (384 - 322 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Appius Claudius on leisure, people, understanding, and work

The Roman people understand work better than leisure. Negotium populo Romano melius quam otium committi

Appius Claudius

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Aphra Behn on language, money, nations, and understanding

Money speaks sense in a language all nations understand.

Aphra Behn (1640 - 1689)

Source: The Rover

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Antonin Artaud on facts, life, and understanding

When we speak the word "life," it must be understood we are not referring to life as we know it from its surface of fact, but to that fragile, fluctuating center which forms never reach.

Antonin Artaud (1896 - 1948)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Antonin Artaud on scientists, theory, and understanding

But how is one to make a scientist understand that there is something unalterably deranged about differential calculus, quantum theory, or the obscene and so inanely liturgical ordeals of the precession of the equinoxes.

Antonin Artaud (1896 - 1948)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anton Pavlovich Chekhov on advice, art, clarity, composers, difficulty, life, nature, proof, sons, soul, talent, trouble, understanding, and writing

Another piece of advice: when you read proof cross out as many adjectives and adverbs as you can. You have so many modifiers that the reader has trouble understanding and gets worn out. It is comprehensible when I write: "The man sat on the grass," because it is clear and does not detain one's attention. On the other hand, it is difficult to figure out and hard on the brain if I write: "The tall, narrow-chested man of medium height and with a red beard sat down on the green grass that had already been trampled down by the pedestrians, sat down silently, looking around timidly and fearfully." The brain can't grasp all that at once, and art must be grasped at once, instantaneously. And then one other thing. You are lyrical by nature, the timber of your soul is soft. If you were a composer you would avoid writing marches. It is unnatural for your talent to curse, shout, taunt, denounce with rage. Therefore, you'll understand if I advise you, in proofreading, to eliminate the "sons of bitches," "curs," and "flea-bitten mutts" that appear here and there on the pages of Life.

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860 - 1904)

Source: To Maxim Gorky, September 3, 1899

Contributed by: Zaady

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