travel

A Quote by William Shakespeare on experience and travel

Jaques: Yes, I have gained my experience. Rosalind: And your experience makes you sad: I had rather have a fool to make me merry than a experience to make me sad; and to travel for it too!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: As You Like It, Act 4, scene 1.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walt Whitman on travel

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NOT I-NOT ANYONE else, can travel that road for you, You must travel it for yourself.

Walt Whitman (1819 - 1892)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Velma West Sykes on adventure, christmas, cities, day, friendship, sleep, stability, travel, and work

Christmas parable: The stable boy had finished work that day, Had filled the manger with new, fragrant hay, Had fed the beasts, and usually would sleep Snuggled for warmth among the placid sheep; But not tonight, for he'd conceived a plan To join a merchant's camel caravan And travel to far places. He had heard Exciting tales of cities which had stirred His longing for adventure. He would go Where things were happening; his friends would know Why he had gone. He often said to them, "Oh, nothing happens here in bethlehem." He looked back once, before they traveled far, And wondered vaguely: why that brilliant star?

Velma West Sykes

Source: Magazine clipping. Albert W. Daw Collection

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on travel

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Neither sound nor thoughts can travel through a vacuum.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on best friend, bitterness, blindness, chance, children, day, defense, dependence, effort, failure, family, friendship, funny, good, gossip, happiness, heart, ideas, justice, laughter, life, love, mortality, pain, quiet, schools, shyne

Life wounds all of us. At best there is sorrow enough to go round. Yet because the deepest wounds are those of the soul and hidden to mortal sight, we keep hurting each other day by day, inflicting wounds that time mercifully scars over. But the scars remain, ready at a touch to throb angrily and ache again with the old gnawing wild pain. You remember that day in school when the teacher laughed? You were only a little fellow, shy and silent, sitting in the shadow of the big boys, wistfully looking toward the day when you would shine as they did. That day you were sure your chance had come. You were sure that you had just what the teacher wanted on the tip of your tongue, and you jumped up and shouted it out loudly and eagerly, triumphantly - and you were very, very wrong. There followed a flash of astonishment, an instant of dreadful silence, and then the room rang with mirth. You heard only the teacher's laughter, and it drowned your heart. Many years have gone over head since that day, but the sight of a little lad trudging along to school brings it back, and the old pain stirs and beats against the scar. You cover it over, hush it to quiet once more with a smile. "I must have been funny. She couldn't help it." But you wish she had. And there was that time when your best friend failed you. When the loose-tongued gossips started the damaging story and he was pressed for a single word in your defense, he said, "Oh, he's all right. Of course, he's all right, but I don't want to get mixed up in this thing. Can't afford it. Have to think of my own name and my own family, you understand. Good fellow, but I have to keep out of this." You felt forsaken. For weeks and weeks you carried the pain in your heart. The story was bad enough but would right itself. The idea that he should fail you, that he had not, rushed to your side at the first hint of trouble was bad enough, was unbearable. He came back again after it was all over, but the sight of him renewed the ache in your breast and the throb of pain in your throat. The scar was thin, and the hurt beneath it quivered. We all bear scars. Life is a struggle, and hurts must come. But why the unnecessary ones? Why hurt the souls of little children? Why say things to them that they must remember with pain all their lives? Why say the smart, tart thing that goes straight to the heart of someone we love because we would relieve ourselves of the day's tension and throw off a grain of the soul's bitterness? Who are we to inflict wounds and suffering and scars on those about us? Staggering, blind mortals, groping our way from somewhere "here" to somewhere "there" conscious of little but the effort to stay "here" a little longer! It behooves us to travel softly, regardful of one another's happiness, particularly where our path crosses that of those dependent upon us for comfort or enters into the heart of little children.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on birth, bitterness, cities, darkness, dawn, death, doubt, emptiness, horses, information, journeys, justice, lies, men, people, regret, sleep, thought, time, travel, water, weather, wine, and women

Journey of the Magi "A cold coming we had of it, Just the worst time of the year For a journey, and such a long journey: The ways deep and the weather sharp, The very dead of winter." And the camels galled, sore-footed, refractory, Lying down in the melting snow. There were times we regretted The summer palaces on slopes, the terraces, And the silken girls bringing sherbet. Then the camel men cursing and grumbling And running away, and wanting their liquor and women, And the night-fires going out, and the lack of shelters, And the cities hostile and the towns unfriendly And the villages dirty and charging high prices: A hard time we had of it. At the end we preferred to travel all night, Sleeping in snatches, With the voices singing in our ears, saying That this was all folly. Then at dawn we came down to a temperate valley, Wet, below the snow line, smelling of vegetation, With a running stream and a water-mill beating the darkness, And three trees on the low sky. And an old white horse galloped away in the meadow. Then we came to a tavern with vine-leaves over the lintel, Six hands at an open door dicing for pieces of silver, And feet kicking the empty wine-skins. But there was no information, and so we continued And arrived at evening, not a moment too soon Finding the place; it was (you may say) satisfactory. All this was a long time ago, I remember, And I would do it again, but set down This set down This: were we led all that way for Birth or Death? There was a Birth, certainly, We had evidence and no doubt. I had seen birth and death, But had thought they were different; this Birth was Hard and bitter agony for us, like Death, our death. We returned to our places, these Kingdoms, But no longer at ease here, in the old dispensation, With an alien people clutching their gods. I should be glad of another death.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Steven Wright on travel

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Bills travel through the mail at twice the speed of checks.

Steven Wright (1955 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Roy Goodman on happiness and travel

Remember that happiness is a way of travel, not a destination.

Roy Goodman

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Louis Stevenson on labor, success, and travel

To travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive, and the true success is to labor.

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850 - 1894)

Source: Virginibus Puerisque, El Dorado

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert L. Stevenson on travel

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I travel not to go anywhere, but to go.

Robert L. Stevenson

Contributed by: Zaady

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