tranquility

A Quote by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus on tranquility

How easy it is to repel and erase every impression which is troublesome or unwelcome, and immediately to be tranquil.

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180)

Source: Meditations

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Kahlil Gibran on friendship, motherhood, sister, sleep, spirit, tranquility, women, and world

Women opened the windows of my eyes and the doors of my spirit. Had it not been for the woman-mother, the woman-sister, and the woman-friend, I would have been sleeping among those who seek the tranquility of the world with their snoring.

Kahlil Gibran (1883 - 1931)

Source: Wisdom of Gibran

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Kahlil Gibran on darkness, life, obstacles, and tranquility

Braving obstacles and hardships is nobler than retreat to tranquility. The butterfly that hovers around the lamp until it dies is more admirable than the mole that lives in a dark tunnel.

Kahlil Gibran (1883 - 1931)

Source: Wisdom of Gibran

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Evelyn on experience, health, longevity, satisfaction, seriousness, and tranquility

Gardening is a labour full of tranquility and satisfaction; natural and instructive, and as such contributes to the most serious contemplation, experience, health and longevity.

John Evelyn (1620 - 1706)

Source: 1666

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Ahmad Ibn `Ata'Allah on abstinence, darkness, faith, god, heart, individuality, reality, tranquility, and weakness

(Paraphrased: As long as an individual's heart is filled with the tendency towards what is other-than-God Most High, there is no Certitude about God.) When certitude about God Most High does occur in the heart . . . the heart becomes tranquil through the Majesty of God; then it abstains from what is other-than-God. So, it stands weak and is compelled to cry out to God for help. Then He who responds to the necessitous when they cry out to Him, responds to it. That radiant light settles into the heart and the darkness of preoccupation with what is other-than-God is extinguished therewith. Then the reality of the Realm (al-Malakut) becomes visible to it, and that is what Harithah meant when he said to the Messenger of God: "It is as if I see the Throne of my Lord distinctly." And the Messenger of God said, "The Light of God Most High is faith in one's heart."

Ibn Ata'Allah

Source: The Key To Salvation: A Sufi Manual of Invocation, 1996. p. 150

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on change, familiarity, life, people, serenity, tranquility, and work

Our days are a kaleidoscope. Every instant a change takes place in the contents. New harmonies, new contrasts, new combinations of every sort. Nothing ever happens twice alike. The most familiar people stand each moment in some new relation to each other, to their work, to surrounding objects. The most tranquil house, with the most serene inhabitants, living upon the utmost regularity of system, is yet exemplifying infinite diversities.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Source: Eyes and Ears

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Henry Ward Beecher on tranquility

Tranquil pleasures last the longest; we are not fitted to bear long the burden of great joys.

Henry Ward Beecher (1813 - 1887)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Grenville Kleiser on life, mind, thought, and tranquility

Do not let trifles disturb your tranquility of mind. The little pin-pricks of daily life when dwelt upon and magnified, may do great damage, but if ignored or dismissed from thought, will disappear from inanition.

Grenville Kleiser (1868 - 1953)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Gordon MacDonald on absence, confusion, direction, emptiness, encouragement, garden, god, growth, guidance, metaphor, order, peace, potential, quiet, sharing, spirit, spirituality, tranquility, and wisdom

For me the appropriate metaphor for the inner spiritual centre is a garden, a place of potential peace and tranquility. This garden is a place where the Spirit of God comes to make self-disclosure to share wisdom, to give affirmation or rebuke, to provide encouragement, and to give direction and guidance. When this garden is in proper order, it is a quiet place, and there is an absence of busyness, of defiling noise, of confusion. The inner garden is a delicate place, and if not properly maintained it will be quickly overrun by intrusive under-growth. God does not often walk in disordered gardens. And that is why inner gardens that are ignored are said to be empty.

Gordon MacDonald

Source: Cultivating Our Spiritual Garden

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Linley on art, authority, authors, composers, existence, happiness, heart, hope, life, losing, memory, music, newspapers, past, privacy, purity, songs, time, tranquility, and wishes

Tho' lost to sight, to mem'ry dear Thou ever wilt remain; One only hope my heart can cheer,- The hope to meet again. Oh fondly on the past I dwell, And oft recall those hours When, wand'ring down the shady dell, We gathered the wild-flowers. Yes, life then seem'd one pure delight, Tho' now each spot looks drear; Yet tho' thy smile be lost to sight, To mem'ry thou art dear. Oft in the tranquil hour of night, When stars illume the sky, I gaze upon each orb of light, And wish that thou wert by. I think upon that happy time, That time so fondly lov'd, When last we heard the sweet bells chime, As thro' the fields we rov'd. Yes, life then seem'd one pure delight, Tho' now each spot looks drear; Yet tho' thy smile be lost to sight, To mem'ry thou art dear. This song-written and composed by Linley for Mr. Augustus Braham, and sung by him-is given entirely, as so much inquiry has been made for the source of "Though lost to Sight, to Memory dear." It is not known when the song was written,-probably about 1830. Another song, entitled "Though lost to Sight, to Memory dear," was published in London in 1880, purporting to have been "written by Ruthven Jenkyns in 1703." It is said to have been published in the "Magazine for Mariners." No such magazine, however, ever existed, and the composer of the music acknowledged, in a private letter, to have copied the song from an American newspaper. There is no other authority for the origin of this song, and the reputed author, Ruthven Jenkyns, was living, under the name of C--, in California in 1882.

George Linley (1798 - 1865)

Source: Song. 1

Contributed by: Zaady

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