tranquility

A Quote by William Wordsworth on emotion, feeling, poetry, spontaneity, and tranquility

Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William S. Ogdon on art, birds, character, clarity, conscience, contentment, control, determination, discovery, economics, effort, enemies, ethics, fashion, goodness, government, happiness, heart, individuality, life, listening, luxury, money,

The Art of Happiness There was never a time when so much official effort was being expended to produce happiness, and probably never a time when so little attention was paid by the individual to creating and personal qualities that make for it. What one misses most today is the evidence of widespread personal determination to develop a character that will, in itself, given any reasonable odds, make for happiness. Our whole emphasis is on the reform of living conditions, of increased wages, of controls on the economic structure-the government approach-and so little on man improving himself. The ingredients of happiness are so simple that they can be counted on one hand. Happiness comes from within, and rests most securely on simple goodness and clear conscience. Religion may not be essential to it, but no one ins known to have gained it without a philosophy resting on ethical principles. Selfishness is its enemy; to make another happy is to be happy one's self. It is quiet, seldom found for long in crowds, most easily won in moments of solitude and reflection. It cannot be bought; indeed, money has very little to do with it. No one is happy unless he is reasonably well satisfied with himself, so that the quest for tranquility must of necessity begin with self-examination. We shall not often be content with what we discover in this scrutiny. There is much to do, and so little done. Upon this searching self-analysis, however, depends the discovery of those qualities that make each man unique, and whose development alone can bring satisfaction. Of all those who have tried, down the ages, to outline a program for happiness, few have succeeded so well as William Henry Channing, chaplain of the House of Representatives in the middle of the last century: "To live content with small means; so seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy . . . to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to the stars and birds, to babes and sages, with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasions, hurry never; in a word to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common." It will be noted that no government can do this for you; you must do it for yourself.

William S. Ogdon

Source: New York Times, Editorial Page, Dec. 30, 1945

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on change, environment, improvement, life, plants, relaxation, time, and tranquility

Why do plants have such a positive impact on us? There are a number of reasons, including: They have a predictable cycle of life that provides comfort in our time of rapid change. They are responsive but nonthreatening. They form no opinions or judgments about their caregivers. They soften our man-made environment. They enable us to change or improve our environment. They promote relaxation and tranquility.

unknown

Source: Gardening – Therapy for Mind, Body and Soul, Proxima Health System, Atlanta

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Stearns Eliot on belief, emotion, meaning, practicality, and tranquility

We must believe that "emotion recollected in tranquillity" is an inexact formula. For it is neither emotion, nor recollection, nor without distortion of meaning, tranquillity. It is a concentration, and a new thing resulting from the concentration of a very great number of experiences which to the practical and active person would not seem to be experiences at all; it is a concentration which does not happen consciously or of deliberation. These experiences are not "recollected" and they finally unite in an atmosphere which is "tranquil" only in that it is a passive attending upon the event.

T.S. Eliot (1888 - 1965)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Jefferson on happiness, tranquility, and wealth

It is neither wealth nor splendor, but tranquility and occupation, which give happiness.

Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Dekker on earth, humility, men, patience, spirit, and tranquility

The best of men That e'er wore earth about him, was a sufferer A soft, meek, patient, humble, tranquil spirit, The first true gentleman that ever breath'd.

Thomas Dekker (c.1572 - 1632)

Source: The Honest Whore, pt. I, 1604, ( in collaboration with Thomas Middleton), act I, sc. ii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Arnold on age, cheerfulness, labor, life, men, play, tranquility, and work

One's age should be tranquil, as childhood should be playful. Hard work at either extremity of life seems out of place. At midday the sun may burn, and men labor under it; but the morning and evening should be alike calm and cheerful.

Thomas Arnold (1795 - 1842)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas á Kempis on caring, heart, praise, and tranquility

Great tranquility of heart is his who cares for neither praise nor blame.

Thomas a Kempis (1380 - 1471)

Source: Imitatio Christi

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Hugh Walpole on belief, earth, happiness, lies, life, spirituality, tranquility, and world

I believe the root of all happiness on this earth to lie in the realization of a spiritual life with a consciousness of something wider than materialism; in the capacity to live in a world that makes you unselfish because you are not overanxious about your own comic fallibilities; that gives you tranquility without complacency because you believe in something so much larger than yourself.

Sir Hugh Walpole (1884 - 1941)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on anxiety, blessings, bravery, certainty, cheerfulness, constancy, contentment, darkness, dependence, duty, equality, fear, fortune, future, god, good, greatness, happiness, hope, indifference, joy, mankind, mind, people

True happiness is to understand our duties toward God and man; to enjoy the present, without anxious dependence upon the future; not to amuse ourselves with either hopes or fears, but to rest satisfied with what we have, which is abundantly sufficient; for he that is so wants nothing. The great blessings of mankind are with us, and within our reach; but we shut our eyes and, like people in the dark, fall foul of the very thing we search for without finding it. Tranquility is a certain equality of mind which no condition of fortune can either exalt or depress. There must be sound mind to make a happy man; there must be constancy in all conditions, a care for the things of this world but without anxiety; and such an indifference to the bounties of fortune that either with them or without them we may live content. True joy is serene. . . . The seat of it is within, and there is no cheerfulness like the resolution of a brave mind that has fortune under its feat. It is an invincible greatness of mind not to be elevated or dejected with good or ill fortune. A wise man is content with his lot, whatever it be - without wishing for what he has not.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

Contributed by: Zaady

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