traditions

A Quote by Charles Lamb on books, fiction, history, and traditions

I like you and your book, ingenious Hone! In whose capacious all-embracing leaves The very marrow of tradition 's shown; And all that history, much that fiction weaves.

Charles Lamb (1775 - 1834)

Source: To the Editor of the Every-Day Book.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by C. Smith Sumner on ambition, authors, correction, day, familiarity, god, guidance, heart, history, honesty, horses, individuality, inspiration, learning, listening, literature, meaning, prayer, prophets, spirit, study, time, traditions, unders

KEYS OF UNDERSTANDING THE BIBLE: (Detail) 1. Read the Bible - over and over - again and again. By repetition you will gain familiarity with the stories, with the characters, with the authors, with the teachings and doctrines and, most importantly, with our Lord and Master. "If we are to know God, we must read His words, for therein He stands revealed to the honest in heart." Bishop J. Richard Clarke, General Conference, Oct.'82. 2. Ponder, Pray and Seek the Spirit. Most important above all others! Seek always to have the Spirit with you. ". . . the things of God knoweth no man, except he has the Spirit of God." 1 Corinthians 2:11. Listen to that "still, small voice." 3. Use the New LDS Edition of the King James Version..."The most significant event in Bible publication in over a hundred years," Daniel H. Ludlow. Forget other translations. 4. Use & rely on the JST, for clarification. Especially as foot-noted in the New LDS Edition of the King James Version. Mark the JST footnotes throughout your Bible. 5. Don't get "hung up" on individual words. Don't be distracted by archaic spellings and usages or "little words" that might not be correct. Read for the Meaning and for the Story while relying on the Spirit. 6. Use commentaries & dictionaries for background . . . history, local customs & traditions; (Use the Bible Dictionary & Maps in the LDS Edition). For doctrinal interpretations, use the scriptures themselves and prayer along with the writings of inspired scholars. "Don't drink from the stream below the horses." 7. Study individual scripture passages in context with all others which are pertinent as to time and doctrine. 8. "Rightly divide" between literal and figurative. Study inspired writings of latter-day apostles and prophets. 9. Modern scripture sheds true light on the ancient. Footnotes and Topical Guide will help. 10. Become familiar with ancient biblical literary styles. Learn some of the basic elements of Israelite writing such as: parallelism, chiasmus, figurative imagery, and dualism. 11. Learn Hebrew and Greek. [For the very ambitious.]

C. Smith Sumner (1933 -)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Brooke Foss Westcott on atheism, charm, christianity, church, conscience, day, duty, divinity, earth, faith, fatherhood, future, generations, god, heaven, language, life, men, past, practicality, pride, rest, separation, present, thought, trad

It is not enough to hold that God did great things for our fathers: not enough to pride ourselves on the inheritance of victories of faith: not enough to build the sepulchres of those who were martyred by men unwilling, in their day of trial as we may be in our own, to hear new voices of a living God. Our duty is to see whether God is with us; whether we expect great things from Him; whether we do not practically place Him far off, forgetting that, if He is, He is about us, speaking to us words that have not been heard before, guiding us to paths on which earlier generations have not been able to enter. There is - most terrible thought! - a practical atheism, orthodox in language, reverent in bearing, which can enter a Christian church and charm the conscience to rest with shadowy traditions; an atheism which grows incessantly within us if we separate what cannot be separated with impunity, the secular from the divine, the past and the future from the present, earth from heaven, the things of Caesar from the things of God.

Brooke Foss Westcott (1825 - 1901)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on achievement, beginning, belief, body, creation, failure, future, interest, justice, knowledge, literature, logic, mathematics, men, merit, order, past, philosophy, physics, problems, research, schools, scienc

The study of logic becomes the central study in philosophy: it gives the method of research in philosophy, just as mathematics gives the method in physics. . . . All this supposed knowledge in the traditional systems must be swept away, and a new beginning must be made. . . . To the large and still growing body of men engaged in the pursuit of science, . . . the new method, successful already in such time-honored problems as number, infinity, continuity, space and time, should make an appeal which the older methods have wholly failed to make. The one and only condition, I believe, which is necessary in order to secure for philosophy in the near future an achievement surpassing all that has hitherto been accomplished by philosophers, is the creation of a school of men with scientific training and philosophical interests, unhampered by the traditions of the past, and not misled by the literary methods of those who copy the ancients in all except their merits.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Source: Our Knowledge of the External World, as a Field For Scientific Method in Philosophy

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Anthony J. D'Angelo on justice and traditions

Just because something is tradition doesn't make it right.

Anthony D'Angelo

Source: The College Blue Book

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alfred North Whitehead on justice and traditions

There is a tradition of opposition between adherents of induction and of deduction. In my view it would be just as sensible for the two ends of a worm to quarrel.

Alfred Whitehead (1861 - 1947)

Source: N. Rose Mathematical Maxims and Minims, Raleigh NC:Rome Press Inc., 1988.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Alan Gregg on adversity, experience, prosperity, survival, and traditions

The human race has had long experience and a fine tradition in surviving adversity. But we now face a task for which we have little experience, the task of surviving prosperity.

Alan Gregg

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on books, fame, people, quotations, survival, time, traditions, and variety

You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you can not fool all the people all of the time. Attributed to Abraham Lincoln. - Alexander K. McClure, "Abe" Lincoln's Yarns and Stories, p. 184 (1904). Many quotation books have also attributed this to Lincoln, with a variety of sources given. According to Roy R Basler ed., The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 81 (1953), "Tradition has come to attribute to the Clinton [Illinois] speeches [September 2, 1858] one of Lincoln's most famous utterances - 'You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.'" But he goes on to say that the epigram and any references to it have not been located in Surviving Lincoln documents. This remark has also been attributed to P. T. Barnum.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: (Attributed) Speech at Clinton, 8 Sept. 1858. (See below.)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by 'Abd al-Kader on achievement, certainty, change, death, diversity, existence, god, grace, life, peace, prophets, reality, reason, traditions, unity, and words

There are two kinds of death, the death which is inevitable and common to all beings, and the death which is voluntary and particular to certain ones of them only. It is the second death which is prescribed for us in the words of the Messenger of Allah: "Die before you die." The resurrection is accomplished for him who dies this voluntary death. His affairs return to God and they are but one. He has returned to God and he sees Him through Him. As the Prophet said - on him be Grace and Peace! - according to a tradition reported by Tabarani, "You will not see your Lord before being dead" and that is because, in the contemplation of this dead-resurrected one, all creatures are annihilated, and for him only one thing exists, one Reality only. Whatever will be the lot of the believers in their posthumous states is prefigured in one degree or another in this life for the initiates. The "return" of things - considered in relation to [the diversity of] their forms - to Allah and the end of their becoming, expresses only a change of cognitive status and not at all a modification of the reality. For him who dies and achieves the resurrection, the multiple is one, by reason of its essential unity; and the One is multiple, by reason of the multiplicity in Him of relations and aspects.

'Abd al-Kader (1807 - 1883)

Source: The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader, 1995, Kitab al-Mawaqif, 221, pp. 51-52

Contributed by: Zaady

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