traditions

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on acceptance, animals, belief, birth, church, familiarity, history, jesus, life, time, and traditions

Canon Farrar accepts the traditional belief that the shelter within which Jesus was born was that of one of the numerous limestone caves which abound in the region, and which are still used by travelers as resting places. He says: "In Palestine it not infrequently happens that the entire khan, or at any rate the portion of it in which the animals are housed, is one of those innumerable caves which abound in the limestone rocks of its central hills. Such seems to have been in the case at the little town of Bethlehem-Ephratah, in the land of Judah. Justin Martyr, the Apologist, who, from his birth at Shechem, was familiar with Palestine, and who lived less than a century after the time of our Lord, places the scene of the nativity in a cave. This is, indeed, the ancient and constant tradition both of the Eastern and the Western Churches, and it is one of the few to which, though unrecorded in the Gospel history, we may attach a reasonable probability."

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, chapter 1, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.8, p.106

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on admiration, agreement, army, conscience, contentment, darkness, deed, guilt, infidelity, inspiration, jesus, money, murder, pride, sons, soul, suffering, time, traditions, vices, virtue, weakness, women, and world

Why did not this multitude of ignorant pilgrims resist? Why did these greedy chafferers content themselves with dark scowls and muttered maledictions, while they suffered their oxen and sheep to be chased into the streets and themselves ejected, and their money flung rolling on the floor by one who was then young and unknown, and in the garb of despised Galilee? Why, in the same way we might ask, did Saul suffer Samuel to beard him in the very presence of his army? Why did David abjectly obey the orders of Joab? Why did Ahab not dare to arrest Elijah at the door of Naboth's vineyard? Because sin is weakness; because there is in the world nothing so abject as a guilty conscience, nothing so invincible as the sweeping tide of a Godlike indignation against all that is base and wrong. How could these paltry sacrilegious buyers and sellers, conscious of wrongdoing, oppose that scathing rebuke, or face the lightnings of those eyes that were enkindled by an outraged holiness? When Phinehas the priest was zealous for the Lord of Hosts, and drove through the bodies of the prince of Simeon and the Midianitish woman with one glorious thrust of his indignant spear, why did not guilty Israel avenge that splendid murder? Why did not every man of the tribe of Simeon become a Goel to the dauntless assassin? Because Vice cannot stand for one moment before Virtue's uplifted arm. Base and grovelling as they were, these money-mongering Jews felt, in all that remnant of their souls which was not yet eaten away by infidelity and avarice, that the Son of Man was right. Nay, even the Priests and Pharisees, and Scribes and Levites, devoured as they were by pride and formalism, could not condemn an act which might have been performed by a Nehemiah or a Judas Maccabaeus, and which agreed with all that was purest and best in their traditions. But when they had heard of this deed, or witnessed it, and had time to recover from the breathless mixture of admiration, disgust, and astonishment which it inspired, they came to Jesus, and though they did not dare to condemn what He had done, yet half indignantly asked Him for some sign that He had a right to act thus.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, p.151 & 152, quoted by James E. Talmage, Jesus the Christ, Ch.12, p.169

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Frederic William Farrar on accuracy, certainty, difficulty, elderly, fatherhood, history, independence, judaism, labor, names, patience, and traditions

It is now almost certain that the genealogies in both Gospels are genealogies of Joseph, which if we may rely on early traditions of their consanguinity involve genealogies of Mary also. The Davidic descent of Mary is implied in Acts 2:30; 13:23; Rom. 1:3; Luke 1:32, etc. St. Matthew gives the legal descent of Joseph through the elder and regal line, as heir to the throne of David; St. Luke gives the natural descent. Thus, the real father of Salathiel was heir of the house of Nathan, but the childless Jeconiah (Jer. 22:30) was the last lineal representative of the elder kingly line. The omission of some obscure names and the symmetrical arrangement into tesseradecads were common Jewish customs. It is not too much to say that after the labors of Mill (on the Mythical Interpretation of the Gospels, pp. 147-217) and Lord A. C. Hervey (on the Genealogies of our Lord, 1853) scarcely a single difficulty remains in reconciling the apparent divergencies. And thus in this as in so many other instances, the very discrepancies which appear to be most irreconcilable, and most fatal to the historic accuracy of the four evangelists, turn out, on closer and more patient investigation, to be fresh proofs that they are not only entirely independent, but also entirely trustworthy.

Frederic William Farrar (1831 - 1903)

Source: Farrar in The Life of Christ, footnote p 27

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Emma Goldman on home and traditions

In the true sense one's native land, with its background of tradition, early impressions, reminiscences and other things dear to one, is not enough to make sensitive human beings feel at home.

Emma Goldman (1869 - 1940)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Elizabeth Barber on design, garden, inclusion, meaning, reflection, traditions, and value

The Japanese garden is a very important tool in Japanese architectural design because, not only is a garden traditionally included in any house design, the garden itself also reflects a deeper set of cultural meanings and traditions. Whereas the English garden seeks to make only an aesthetic impression, the Japanese garden is both aesthetic and reflective. The most basic element of any Japanese garden design comes from the realization that every detail has a significant value.

Elizabeth Barber

Source: The Shiga Project: The Japanese Garden

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A Quote by Edwin T. Morris on agriculture, civilization, contempt, country, divinity, feeling, life, nobility, simplicity, and traditions

In Europe, the word peasant was a term of contempt used by the nobility, but the Chinese scholars used to fancy themselves rustics. Agriculture was viewed as a noble occupation; buying and selling, by contrast were considered nonproductive. One of the founders of the Chinese civilization was said to have been the venerable She Nung, the "Divine Farmer." A scholar often affected to be nothing more than an "old farmer" or a "simple fisherman" and referred to his elegant villa as "my thatched hut." This Rosseau-like feeling for the country life is an important undercurrent in the scholarly tradition.

Edwin T. Morris

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Donald L. Hallstrom on love, people, traditions, and unity

Uplifting traditions . . . that promote love for Deity and unity in families and among people are especially important.

Donald L. Hallstrom

Source: Ensign, November 2000. © by Intellectual Reserve, Inc. Used by permission.

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A Quote by Donald DeMarco on body, certainty, clarity, idealism, knowledge, philosophy, religion, science, superiority, superstition, traditions, and world

Science is a body of truths which offers clear and certain knowledge about the real world and is therefore superior to tradition, philosophy, religion, dogma, and superstition which offer shadowy knowledge about an ideal world

Donald DeMarco

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Daniel Dennett on abuse, anxiety, controversy, cosmology, culture, danger, defeat, ethics, force, ideas, improvement, politics, psychology, religion, revolution, struggle, thinking, traditions, and understanding

Much of the controversy and anxiety that has enveloped Darwin's idea ... can be understood as a series of campaigns in the struggle to contain Darwin's idea within some acceptably "safe" and merely partial revolution. Cede some or all of modern biology to Darwin, perhaps, but hold the line there! Keep Darwinian thinking out of cosmology, out of psychology, out of human culture, out of ethics, politics, and religion! In these campaigns, many battles have been won by the forces of containment: flawed applications of Darwin's idea have been exposed and discredited, beaten back by the champions of the pre-Darwinian tradition. But new waves of Darwinian thinking keep coming. They seem to be improved versions, not vulnerable to the refutations that defeated their predeccessors, but are they sound extensions of the unquestionably sound Darwinian core idea, or might they, too, be perversions of it, and even more virulent, more dangerous, than the abuses of Darwin already refuted?

Daniel Dennett (1942 -)

Source: Darwin's Dangerous Idea, London, Penguin, 1995, p 63

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Christopher McDowell on birth, dreams, experience, life, motherhood, principles, traditions, vision, and water

Ancient traditions have long associated holy wells and springs as very special places of the Goddess or anima mundi: symbolic of the Great Mother and associated with birth, the feminine principle, the universal womb, the prima materia, the waters of fertility and refreshment and the fountain of life. The dreaming sites, as they are called, have also been associated with visions, healing, and other paranormal experiences. In ancient Greece, for example, there were more than three-hundred medical centers placed at water sources, where patients experienced healing.

Christopher McDowell

Source: The Sanctuary Garden, 1998, p. 62

Contributed by: Zaady

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