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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on consequences, control, dogs, self-control, temper, time, yielding, and path

Quarrel not at all. No man resolved to make the most of himself can spare time for personal contention. Still less can he afford to take all the consequences, including the vitiation of his temper and loss of self-control. Yield larger things to which you can show no more than equal right; and yield lesser ones, though clearly your own. Better give your path to a dog than be bitten by him in contesting for the right. Even killing the dog would not cure the bite.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on business, compromise, good, lawyers, neighbors, opportunity, persuasion, superiority, and time

Discourage litigation. Persuade your neighbors to compromise whenever you can. Point out to them how the nominal winner is often a real loser - in fees, expenses, and waste of time. As a peacemaker the lawyer has a superior opportunity of being a good man. There will still be business enough.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: "Notes for a Law Lecture" July 1, 1850, p. 81.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, beginning, borrowing, business, challenge, company, debate, defeat, failure, fame, family, force, friendship, home, jobs, journeys, laws, losing, majorities, minorities, money, motherhood, performance, politics, pop

Here's Abraham Lincoln's incredible journey to become the sixteenth president of the United States of America! 1809 - Born February 12 in a log cabin in the backwoods of Hardin County (now Larue County), Kentucky 1816 - He worked to support his family after they were forced out of their home. 1818 - His mother, Nancy Hanks, died. 1831 - Failed in business. 1832 - Defeated for Illinois House of Representatives. 1832 - Lost his job, couldn't get into law school, worked odd jobs. 1832 - Chosen captain of company of volunteers which did not see battle in the Black Hawk War. 1833 - Grocery business failed. Declared bankruptcy, yet paid off the money he borrowed from friends to start his business. 1834 - Elected to Illinois state legislature and served four successive terms (until 1841). 1836 - Obtained license as an attorney. 1837 - Became law partner in Springfield, Illinois, with John T. Stuart. 1838 - Defeated in becoming speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives. 1840 - Defeated in becoming elector. 1842 - Married Mary Todd on Nov. 4. They had four sons. 1843 - Defeated for US House of Representatives. 1847 - Served one term in US House of Representatives as a Whig. 1849 - Defeated for US House of Representatives. 1849 - Rejected for the position of Commissioner of the General Land Office. 1849 - Retired from politics. 1855 - Defeated for US Senate as a Whig. 1855 - Became a Republican. 1856 - Considered for vice-president (got less than 100 votes in convention). 1858 - Nominated as the Republican candidate for US Senator from Illinois. 1858 - Challenged Stephen A. Douglas. The seven debates became famous. 1858 - Defeated for US Senate as a Republican, he had made his mark. 1860 - Selected as the Republican candidate for president. 1860 - Elected president of the United States with a minority of the popular vote. 1861 - Inaugurated March 4. 1861 - Seven states had seceded by the time of his inauguration. 1861 - On April 12, Fort Sumter was fired upon and the Civil War had begun. 1863 - Issued Emancipation Proclamation on Jan. 1. 1864 - Elected to second term as president by a great majority. 1865 - On April 9, Gen. Robert E. Lee and Gen. Ulysses S. Grant signed the terms of Confederate Surrender. 1865 - On April 14, Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth while attending a performance at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC. He died the next morning.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on agreement, confusion, country, justice, and time

The story of a jackass Lincoln owned as a young man: The case of that jackass was most singular. When everything was pleasant all around he would kick the worst. When his rack was fullest and his stall fixed with new straw and everything real comfortable, that jackass would start in on the almightiest spell of kicking that was ever seen. All the veterinary surgeons in the neighborhood came and tried to find out just what made the critter kick so. They never could agree about it. One thing we all noticed was that he always brayed and kicked at the same time. Sometimes he would bray first and then kick, but other times he would kick first and then bray, so that confused us, and nobody in that whole country was ever able to find out whether that jackass was braying at his own kick or kicking at his own brays.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Campaign for Congress, Sangamon, Illinois, 1854

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on books, fame, people, quotations, survival, time, traditions, and variety

You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you can not fool all the people all of the time. Attributed to Abraham Lincoln. - Alexander K. McClure, "Abe" Lincoln's Yarns and Stories, p. 184 (1904). Many quotation books have also attributed this to Lincoln, with a variety of sources given. According to Roy R Basler ed., The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln, vol. 3, p. 81 (1953), "Tradition has come to attribute to the Clinton [Illinois] speeches [September 2, 1858] one of Lincoln's most famous utterances - 'You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.'" But he goes on to say that the epigram and any references to it have not been located in Surviving Lincoln documents. This remark has also been attributed to P. T. Barnum.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: (Attributed) Speech at Clinton, 8 Sept. 1858. (See below.)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on army, authors, danger, death, destruction, earth, expectation, force, military, nations, suicide, and time

At what point then is the approach of danger to be expected? I answer, if it ever reach us, it must spring up amongst us. It cannot come from abroad. If destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen, we must live through all time, or die by suicide. At what point shall we expect the approach of danger? By what means shall we fortify against it? hall we expect some transatlantic military giant, to step the Ocean, and crush us at a blow? Never! All the armies of Europe, Asia and Africa combined, with all the treasure of the earth (our own excepted) in their military chest; with a Buonaparte for a commander, could not by force, take a drink from the Ohio, or make a track on the Blue Ridge, in a trial of a thousand years.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: address before the Young Men's Lyceum, Springfield, Illinois, January 27, 1838.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham L. Feinberg on acceptance, body, books, control, cynicism, day, envy, faith, imagination, life, limitations, energy, mind, peace, people, prayer, relaxation, silence, solitude, soul, spirituality, strength, time, trying, and worry

Ten Spiritual Tonics 1. Stop worrying. Worry kills life. 2. Begin each day with a prayer. It will arm your soul. 3. Control appetite. Over-indulgence clogs body and mind. 4. Accept your limitations . . . 5. Don't envy. It wastes time and energy. 6. Have faith in people. Cynicism sours the disposition. 7. Find a hobby. It will relax your nerves. 8. Read a book a week to stimulate imagination and broaden your views. 9. Spend some time alone for the peace of solitude and silence. 10. Try to want what you have, instead of spending your strength trying to get what you want.

Abraham L. Feinberg

Source: notes

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by 'Abd al-Kader on separation and time

The absolutely Non-Manifested cannot be designated by any expression which could limit It, Separate It, or include It. In spite of this, every allusion alludes only to Him, every designation designates Him, and He is at the same time the Non-Manifested and the Manifested.

'Abd al-Kader (1807 - 1883)

Source: The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader, 1995, Kitab al-Mawaqif, 132, p. 87

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A Quote by 'Abd al-Kader on god, perception, relatives, and time

Allah is in Himself the non-being and the being, the inexistent and the existent. He is at the same time that which we designate by absolute non-being and by absolute being; or by relative non-being and relative being. . . . All these designation come back to God alone, for there is nothing which we can perceive, know, write or say which is not Him.

'Abd al-Kader (1807 - 1883)

Source: The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader, 1995, Kitab al-Mawaqif, 287, p. 85

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by 'Abd al-Kader on divinity, god, independence, names, needs, order, respect, and time

Know however that God, in order to manifest Himself by His essence to His essence, has no need of creatures since, with relation to Essence, he is absolutely independent with respect to worlds and even with respect to His own names. . . . On the other hand, when He manifests Himself with His names and His attributes - which implies the manifestation of the effects - He needs (huwa muftaqir) the creatures. . . . This relation is . . . necessary in order that the divine Names, which are only distinguished by their effects, can be distinguished from one another. At the same time, the divine Names, by the one of their "faces" which is turned toward the Essence, are themselves totally autonomous with respect to worlds. In this respect, they are nothing other than the Essence itself and that is why each of them can be qualified and designated by all of the other Names in the same way as the Essence.

'Abd al-Kader (1807 - 1883)

Source: The Spiritual Writings of 'Abd al-Kader, 1995, Kitab al-Mawaqif, 103, pp. 114-115

Contributed by: Zaady

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