thinking

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, thinking, consciousness, intellect, modernity, and truth

In characterizing realities no less than in taking positions on issues, consciousness generalizes, i.e. genericizes:  in articulating or formulating, it reduces things, even our own selves, to forms, abstractions, idealizations, types, archetypes, simplisms.  “Thinking” is an activity that ultimately grounds or resolves itself in the satisfying, self-certain form of orthodoxies, preconceptions, uncriticized and imperative norms; and it is overwhelmingly inept to recognize just how pathetic, parasitic or placental is its relation to its “own” fundamental norms of understanding and valuation.  Rarely if ever does any act of thinking grow so laserlike or iconoclastically intensive as to escape from the dense miasma of what is acceptable.  To think what actually is is even more contranatural for humans than to see what actually is:  as subjectivizing as “seeing” is, “thinking” is many degrees or magnitudes more saturated with conditioned biases, delusions, self-deceptions.  A program of hygiene or asepsis for the sanity, acuity and clarity of syncretic or wholesided thinking—a discipline of orthotics for sobering, grounding and polemicizing of well-formed gnoseonoesis—is needless to say unknown in modernity.  Not just language but virtually all of intellect, education, culture, etc. have been adapted into utilities, tools whose very aspectivity militates against the nakedness of “evidence,” which is to say, against candor and against truth:  regardless of what it may be called, “evidence,” even the most obvious and blatant, is in actuality not so “evident” to most people, and the modern development of “sophistication” or “education” typically worsens the obscurantism.

Kenneth Smith

Source: http://www.tcj.com/blog/kenneth-smith-on-the-cave-of-false-consciousness

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, art, literature, spirit, personality, thinking, mind, intellect, life, and psyche

How infinitely happier and more grateful is the whole personality or spirit when it finds something nourishing in art or writing or thinking, than the mere mind or intellect is:  the kinship you celebrate in these personalities is your own dismembered Orpheus stumbling across another fine organ to rejoin to itself.  I put it this way:  aristic psyche loves itself enough to chasten itself, to put itself through boot camp for the sake of being competent for life, alive to life.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, conformity, consciousness, elitism, democratism, americans, communism, corporations, culturalization, and thinking

In spite of the actuality that no one who is not extraordinarily cultured can even begin to think for himself, and Americans are not even remotely cultured personalities; and in spite of the actuality that marriages, families, religions, languages, public funds, public schools and libraries and post offices and clinics and even corporations and mass-media are all forms of “communism,” Americans take “mind control” and “communism” as the horror of all horrors (witness the cyclical crusades of Red Scares, the ever-piquant Invasion of the Body Snatchers, etc.).  But in spite of such a phobia against losing proprietary control of their “own” minds, Americans are one of the most cult-prone, mass-organized and –manipulable collectivities that has ever existed, as abject and pathos-besotted conformists down to their slavish toenails.  In the early nineteenth century De Tocqueville already observed this striking phobia among Americans against standing alone and thinking for oneself.  The bonds of subrational control over us are more potent than ever precisely because the critical culture, the “know thyself” that would make such controls accessible to conscious evaluation, has withered to nothing, eaten away by democratist fear of “elitist” critical intelligence and proprietarist neglect of and contempt for public education.

Kenneth Smith

Source: http://www.tcj.com/?p=548

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by Bhagavad Gita on concentration, peace, thought, and thinking

For him who has no concentration, there is no tranquility.

Bhagavad Gita

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Natalie Goldberg on stress, emergency, relaxation, letting go, and thinking

Stress is an ignorant state. It believes that everything is an emergency.

Natalie Goldberg

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Benjamin Hoff on tense, relaxation, thinking, and meditation

And when you try too hard, it doesn't work. Try grabbing something quickly and precisely with a tensed-up arm; then relax and try it again. Try doing something with a tense mind. The surest way to become Tense, Awkward, and Confused is to develop a mind that tries too hard--one that thinks too much.

Benjamin Hoff

Source: The Tao of Pooh, Pages: 76

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Bill Watterson on play, problems, letting go, and thinking

Letting your mind play is the best way to solve problems.

Bill Watterson (1958 -)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Paulo Coelho on spirituality, seeking, thinking, and desire

People who are on a spiritual quest don't think, they simply want results.

Paulo Coelho

Source: The Witch of Portobello, Pages: 11

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Samuel Beckett on questions, curiosity, knowledge, thinking, and thought

And all these questions I ask myself. It is not in a spirit of curiosity. I cannot be silent. About myself I need know nothing. Here all is clear. No, all is not clear. But the discourse must go on. So one invents obscurities. Rhetoric.

Samuel Beckett (1906 - 1989)

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Bertrand Arthur William Russell on thought, fear, thinking, and freedom

Men fear thought as they fear nothing else on earth - more than ruin - more even than death... Thought is subversive and revolutionary, destructive and terrible, thought is merciless to privilege, established institutions, and comfortable habit. Thought looks into the pit of hell and is not afraid. Thought is great and swift and free, the light of the world, and the chief glory of man.

Bertrand Russell (1872 - 1970)

Contributed by: Siona

Syndicate content