taoism

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on action, beginning, destruction, effort, gifts, persistence, trying, understanding, and taoism

If you persist in trying to attain what is never attained (It is Tao's gift), if you persist in making effort to obtain what effort cannot get, if you persist in reasoning about what cannot be understood, you will be destroyed by the very thing you seek. To know when to stop, to know when you can get no further by your own action, this is the right beginning!

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, (23:3-7, p. 197)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on chance, silence, words, and taoism

Uncreated To name Tao is to name no-thing. Tao is not the name of (something created). "Cause" and "chance" have no bearing on the Tao. Tao is a name that indicates without defining. Tao is beyond words and beyond things. It is not expressed either in word or in silence. Where there is no longer word or silence Tao is apprehended.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (25:11, p. 226)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on belief, books, freedom, ideas, life, nature, nonsense, originality, paradox, principles, problems, sage, solution, style, and taoism

Chuang Tzu or Chuang Chou was a Taoist sage, living sometime before 250 B.C. The book, by the same name, Chuang Tzu, is believed to contain both his own writings and writings by others about him and his teachings. ". . . the Chuang-Tzu is distinguished by its brilliant and original style, with abundant use of satire, paradox, and seemingly nonsensical stories. Chuang-Tzu emphasizes the relativity of all ideas. . . . He puts forward as the solution to the problems of the human condition, freedom in identification with the universal Tao, or principle of Nature." The Columbia Encyclopedia, 4th Edition.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on exercise, rest, thought, and taoism

To exercise no-thought and rest in nothing is the first step toward resting in Tao. To start from nowhere and follow no road is the first step toward attaining Tao.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 22:1, p. 176

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on beginning, cooking, dance, good, guidance, idleness, instinct, joy, life, sacred, secrets, senses, spirit, work, and taoism

Prince Wen Hui's cook was cutting up an ox. . . . The ox fell apart with a whisper. The bright cleaver murmured like a gentle wind. Rhythm! Timing! Like a sacred dance. . . . Prince Wen Hui: Good work! Your method is faultless! The cook: Method? What I follow is Tao beyond all methods! When I first began to cut up oxen I would see before me the whole ox all in one mass. After three years I no longer saw this mass. I saw the distinctions. But now I see nothing with the eye. My whole being apprehends. My senses are idle. The spirit free to work without plan follows its own instinct guided by natural line, by the secret opening, the hidden space, my cleaver finds its own way... Then I withdraw the blade, I stand still and let the joy of the work sink in. I clean the blade and put it away. Prince Wan Hui: This is it! My cook has shown me how I ought to live my own life!

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (3:2, pp. 64-67)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on clarity, death, driving, failure, fighting, life, lust, men, mind, planning, serenity, sorrow, success, and taoism

The true men of old were not afraid when they stood alone in their views. No great exploits. No plans. If they failed, no sorrow. No self-congratulation in success. . . . The true men of old knew no lust for life, no dread of death. Their entrance was without gladness, their exit, yonder, without resistance. Easy come, easy go. They did not forget where from, nor ask where to, nor drive grimly forward fighting their way through life. They took life as it came, gladly; took death as it came, without care; and went away, yonder. Yonder! They had no mind to fight Tao. They did not try by their own contriving, to help Tao along. These are the ones we call true men. Minds free, thoughts gone. Brows clear, faces serene.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 6:1, pp. 89-90

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on clarity, direction, intuition, men, opposites, relationships, rest, thought, understanding, and taoism

Tao is obscured when men understand only one pair of opposites, or concentrate only on a partial aspect of being. Then clear expression also becomes muddled by mere wordplay, affirming this one aspect and denying all the rest. The pivot of Tao passes through the center where all affirmations and denials converge. He who grasps the pivot is at the still-point from which all movements and oppositions can be seen in their right relationship... Abandoning all thought of imposing a limit or taking sides, he rests in direct intuition.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (2:3, p. 59, p.61)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on disorder, earth, gifts, heaven, order, principles, understanding, and taoism

When we look at things in the light of Tao, nothing is best, nothing is worst. Each thing, seen in its own light stands out in its own way. It can seem to be "better" than what is compared with it on its own terms. But seen in terms of the whole, no one thing stands out as "better" ... All creatures have gifts of their own... All things have varying capacities. Consequently he who wants to have right without wrong, order without disorder, does not understand the principles of heaven and earth. He does not know how things hang together. Can a man cling only to heaven and know nothing of earth? They are correlative: to know one is to know the other. To refuse one is to refuse both.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Quotations from Chuang Tzu, (17:4,5,8, pp. 131-133)

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on losing, needs, water, and taoism

All the fish needs is to get lost in the water. All man needs is to get lost in Tao.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu

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A Quote by Chuang Chou, a.k.a. Chuang Tzu, Chuang Tse Chuang on emptiness, knowledge, limits, mind, and taoism

The mind remains undetermined in the great Void. Here the highest knowledge is unbounded. That which gives things their thusness cannot be delimited by things. So when we speak of 'limits', we remain confined to limited things. The limit of the unlimited is called 'fullness.' The limitlessness of the limited is called 'emptiness.' Tao is the source of both. But it is itself neither fullness nor emptiness.

Chuang Tzu (c.360 BC - c. 275 BC)

Source: Chuang Tzu, 22:6, pp. 182-183

Contributed by: Zaady

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