taoism

A Quote by Benjamin Hoff on taoism and harmony

Through working in harmony with life's circumstances, Taoist understanding changes what others may percieve as negative into something positive.

Benjamin Hoff

Source: The Tao of Pooh

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Benjamin Hoff on taoism, life, and mastery

When you discard arrogance, complexity, and a few other things that get in the way, sooner or later you will discover that simple, childlike, and mysterious secret known to those of the Uncarved Block: Life is Fun.

Benjamin Hoff

Source: The Tao of Pooh

Contributed by: Siona

A Quote by Lao Tzu on taoism

in

Turning back is how the way moves;
Weakness is the means the way employs.
The myriad creatures in the world are born from
Something, and Something from Nothing.

Tao Te Ching - II. 40

Lao Tzu (c.604 - 531 B.C.)

Source: Tao Te Ching

Contributed by: Josianne

A Quote by Siji Tzu on taoism

in

Understanding the Dao is like trying to cage the wind.

Siji Tzu

Source: http://www.daozang.com/sijitzu.html

Contributed by: Erick

A Quote by Stewart W. Holmes on earth, generations, home, and taoism

How can we fret and stew sub specie aeternitatis - under the calm gaze of ancient Tao? The salt of the sea is in our blood; the calcium of the rocks is in our bones; the genes of ten thousand generations of stalwart progenitors are in our cells. The sun shines and we smile. The winds rage and we bend before them. The blossoms open and we rejoice. Earth is our long home.

Stewart W. Holmes

Source: 1973

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on action, knowledge, progress, sincerity, teachers, and taoism

If you are sincere in seeking this knowledge, you must look for a teacher and humbly ask your teacher to show you the opening of the Mysterious Gate. From then on, if your actions follow the Tao, you will progress. If your actions stray from the Tao, your progress will be halted.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 19

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on beginning, earth, existence, goodness, heaven, life, energy, and taoism

The Tao is supreme goodness. It has no form and is limitless. It is formless because there is no visible trace of its existence. The Tao is that energy that has existed from the beginning when there was neither structure nor differentiation. It is the source of life in heaven and on earth. It creates and all things.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 4

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on action, change, intelligence, knowledge, mind, mistakes, purity, spirit, stillness, and taoism

. . . knowledge emerges in (humans). Opposed to knowledge is the spirit. The spirit is formless and is incomprehensible to mundane thoughts. . . . Knowledge is active, mischievous, and intelligent. It changes constantly. Spirit, on the other hand, is the master of humankind. Its origin is in wu-chi. . . . It is never born and it never dies. The spirit tends toward purity and stillness. Knowledge tends toward action and disturbs the mind so that it cannot be still. . . . Recognize the difference between the human mind and the mind of Tao. Do not mistake the human mind for the mind of Tao, and knowledge for the spirit.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 35-37

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on death, words, and taoism

The Tao that is coded in words is dead. The teachings of the Tao are so precious and important that they cannot be revealed in the written word.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 30

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Shui-ch'ing Tzu on harmony, humanity, laws, nature, purity, and taoism

The Jade Pure, the Most Pure, and the High Pure Realms represent three levels of enlightenment. To rise to the Jade Pure Realm is to attain wu-chi, the highest form of enlightenment. This is complete union with the Tao. To enter the Realm of the Great Pure is to exist in a state in which subject and object are differentiated but are integral parts of the Tao. It is a lesser form of enlightenment. To attain the Realm of the High Pure is to exist in harmony with nature and humanity, to live according to the laws of nature, and to embody the highest virtues of humanity. This is the lowest form of enlightenment.

Shui-ch'ing Tzu (between 1600 & 1911 -)

Source: commentary on T'ai Shang Ch'ing-ching Ching, written in Six Dynasties Era (220-589 AD), p 7

Contributed by: Zaady

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