talent

A Quote by Louis Nizer on culture, indifference, individuality, nations, people, skill, talent, and unity

Many people with different backgrounds, cultures, languages, and creeds combine to make a nation. But that nation is greater than the sum total of the individual skills and talents of its people. Something more grows out of their unity than can be calculated by adding the assets of individual contributions. That intangible additional quantity is often due to the differences which make the texture of the nation rich. Therefore, we must never wipe out or deride the differences amongst us-for where there is no difference, there is only indifference.

Louis Nizer (1902 - 1994)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Babington, Lord Macaulay on abuse, art, inferiority, judgment, and talent

A man possessed of splendid talents, which he often abused, and of a sound judgment, the admonitions of which he often neglected; a man who succeeded only in an inferior department of his art, but who in that department succeeded pre-eminently.

Lord Macaulay Thomas Babington (1800 - 1859)

Source: On John Dryden. 1828. (From His Essays.)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Leo Calvin Rosten on fate, fulfillment, god, happiness, life, luck, nobility, purpose, and talent

The purpose of life is to matter, to be productive, to have it make some difference that you lived at all. Happiness, in the ancient, noble sense, means self-fulfillment-and is given to those who use to the fullest whatever talents God or luck or fate bestowed upon them.

Leo Calvin Rosten (1908 - 1997)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by LaVell Edwards on day, happiness, history, kindness, people, seasons, talent, time, and winning

Looking at the championship-winning quarterbacks, Edwards remembered their particular talents: Robbie Bosco: One of my all time favorite people. He never changed from the day he came here to the day he left. He's a very happy guy, laid back, casual, kind of self-effacing. Yet look at that Michigan game. That was one of the guttiest performances in the history of anything. All those games during the championship season when we had to come from behind to win. He could reach back and kind whatever he needed to win. He could run, he could throw, the other players wanted to come through for him. He did it all.

LaVell Edwards (1931 -)

Source: Lee Benson in And They Came to Pass, 1988

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by LaVell Edwards on cinema, good, ideas, practice, talent, and winning

Looking at the championship-winning quarterbacks, Edwards remembered their particular talents: Steve Young: Here's a guy that is really a talent. He's the best athlete we ever had. He could run, he developed into a good thrower. He's smart. He's intense. He could make it in the movies. Really, he's got it all. He was coachable, but he had his own ideas. He never let up, not even in practice. I'd take Steve Young every year.

LaVell Edwards (1931 -)

Source: Lee Benson in And They Came to Pass, 1988

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by LaVell Edwards on justice, play, sports, talent, and winning

Looking at the championship-winning quarterbacks, Edwards remembered their particular talents: Gary Sheide: The image of Joe Namath. He even had Joe's number. Had just a great feel and touch for the game. A great athlete who could play all the sports. He was more of a streak guy than any of them. He could miss two or three passes and then get hot and hit ten straight. He was the one who got it all started.

LaVell Edwards (1931 -)

Source: Lee Benson in And They Came to Pass, 1988

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by LaVell Edwards on awareness, certainty, good, justice, kindness, practice, talent, and winning

Looking at the championship-winning quarterbacks, Edwards remembered their particular talents: Gifford Nielsen: He was never a very good practice player. He couldn't run, he didn't have a great arm, he was kind of gangly, but he was sharp as a whip. Such a competitor. As good as we ever had. He had the intangibles that certain leaders have. A presence, an awareness. They're best under pressure. Like Mel Tillis, he talks and he stutters, but when he sings it's completely different. It was like that with Giff. On the field, something just clicked.

LaVell Edwards (1931 -)

Source: Lee Benson in And They Came to Pass, 1988

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by LaVell Edwards on ability, blindness, kindness, leadership, problems, talent, vision, and winning

Looking at the championship-winning quarterbacks, Edwards remembered their particular talents: Jim McMahon: A great natural leader. Great ability. Great presence. For a guy who was supposed to be blind in one eye, he had as much vision as anyone I've ever seen. He'd know instinctively where he should turn and where he should throw the ball. He was never a problem on the field. He was kind of cocky, but that didn't bother me. He had such a quick delivery and such a natural ability. I told Chicago he'd win them a Super Bowl.

LaVell Edwards (1931 -)

Source: Lee Benson in And They Came to Pass, 1988

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by LaVell Edwards on direction, grace, intelligence, justice, kindness, problems, quiet, style, talent, thought, and winning

Looking at the championship-winning quarterbacks, Edwards remembered their particular talents: Marc Wilson: He probably had more grace and form and style than anybody I've seen who's 6'5". He played like he was 6'1". A very fluid athlete. He had great speed. Look at the pictures of him. Everything's symmetric. His back is straight, his knees are bent, his feet are in the right direction. Just a terrific athlete. And highly intelligent. He wasn't a real take charge guy. He had a kind of high pitched voice, and that sort of compounded his image problem. But he was much more competitive and tougher than you thought. In his quiet way he'd always get it done.

LaVell Edwards (1931 -)

Source: Lee Benson in And They Came to Pass, 1988

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Larry Mcmurtry on art, endings, good, life, suffering, and talent

Obviously, where art has it over life is in the matter of editing. Life can be seen to suffer from a drastic lack of editing. It stops too quick, or else it goes on too long. Worse, its pacing is erratic. Some chapters are little more than a few sentences in length, while others stretch into volumes. Life, for all its raw talent, has little sense of structure. It creates amazing textures, but it can't be counted on for snappy beginnings or good endings either. Indeed, in many cases no ending is provided at all.

Larry Mcmurtry

Contributed by: Zaady

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