sympathy

A Quote by Marcus Aurelius Antoninus on body, evil, imagination, intelligence, limits, mind, pain, power, serenity, soul, sympathy, present, thought, and tranquility

In every pain let this thought be present, that there is no dishonor in it, nor does it make the governing intelligence worse. Indeed, in the case of most pains, let this remark of Epicurus aid thee, that pain is neither intolerable nor everlasting - if thou bearest in mind that it has its limits, and if thou addest nothing to it in imagination. Pain is either an evil to the body (then let the body say what it thinks of it!)-or to the soul. But it is in the power of the soul to maintain its own serenity and tranquility, and not to think that pain is an evil. . . . It will suffice thee to remember as concerning pain . . . that the mind may, by stopping all manner of commerce and sympathy with the body, still retain its own tranquility.

Marcus Aurelius (121 - 180)

Source: Meditations

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Malcolm S. Forbes on needs and sympathy

The more sympathy you give, the less you need.

Malcolm Forbes (1919 - 1990)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Louisa May Alcott on learning, libraries, mind, possessions, sympathy, attitude, beauty, and perspective

When Emerson's library was burning at Concord, I went to him as he stood with the firelight on his strong, sweet face, and endeavored to express my sympathy for the loss of his most valued possessions, but he answered cheerily, 'Never mind, Louisa, see what a beautiful blaze they make! We will enjoy that now.' The lesson was one never forgotten and in the varied lessons that have come to me I have learned to look for something beautiful and bright.

Louisa May Alcott (1832 - 1888)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Kahlil Gibran on forgiveness, hope, love, mercy, misery, motherhood, purity, sorrow, soul, strength, sympathy, and weakness

The mother is everything-she is our consolation in sorrow, our hope in misery, and our strength in weakness. She is the source of love, mercy, sympathy, and forgiveness. He who loses his mother loses a pure soul who blesses and guards him constantly.

Kahlil Gibran (1883 - 1931)

Source: Wisdom of Gibran

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Joseph Fort Newton on anger, citizenship, country, cynicism, debate, good, history, hope, idealism, interest, justice, loyalty, men, personality, personality, principles, service, spirit, and sympathy

In his capacity as an American citizen, each man of our Craft will do what seems to him wise and just and right and to the best interest of his country; but let us hope and pray that no echo of angry debate may be heard in any Lodge of Masons . . . lest we injure what is priceless. . . . By the same token, the men who stand out in our history, to whom we pay the highest homage, are the men of personality, principle and ideals, who, combining sympathy and good will with unbending loyalty to great truths, defied the cynical spirit and wrought disinterestedly for the common good. By as much as Masonry creates such men and endows them with moral ideals, by so much does it render its highest service to the country and the Craft.

Joseph Fort Newton (1878 - 1950)

Source: The Philalethes, August 1999, published byThe Philalethes Society

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John W. Raper on sympathy

Sympathy is never wasted except when you give it to yourself.

John W. Raper

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Ruskin on animals, christianity, education, and sympathy

Without the perfect sympathy with the animals around them, no gentleman's education, no Christian education, could be of any possible use.

John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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A Quote by John Quincy Adams on ambition, america, assumptions, change, colors, destruction, envy, force, freedom, heart, independence, individuality, interest, liberty, maxims, power, spirit, sympathy, and world

Wherever the standard of freedom and independence has been or shall be unfurled, there will her [America's] heart, her benedictions and her prayers be. But she goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own. She will recommend the general cause, by the countenance of her voice, and the benignant sympathy of her example. She well knows that by once enlisting under other banners than her own, were they even the banners of foreign independence, she would involve herself, beyond the power of extrication, in all the wars of interest and intrigue, of individual avarice, envy, and ambition, which assume the colors and usurp the standard of freedom. The fundamental maxims of her policy would insensibly change from liberty to force. . . . She might become the dictatress of the world: she would be no longer the ruler of her own spirit. This appears with minor variations in punctuation and with italics in the phrase "change from liberty to force," in John Quincy Adams and American Continental Empire, ed. Walter LaFeber, p. 45 (1965).

John Quincy Adams (1767 - 1848)

Source: An Address…. Celebrating the Anniversary of Independence, at the City of Washington on the Fourth of July 1821…, p. 32 (1821).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Muir on people, relationships, separation, sympathy, and world

Most people are on the world, not in it. - have no conscious sympathy or relationship to anything about them - undiffused, separate, and rigidly alone like marbles of polished stone, touching but separate.

John Muir (1838 - 1914)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by John Burroughs on birds, feeling, home, nature, privacy, reflection, struggle, suffering, sympathy, and time

Nature comes home to one most when he is at home; the stranger and traveler finds her a stranger and traveler also. One's own landscape comes in time to be a sort of outlying part of himself; he has sowed himself broadcast upon it, and it reflects his own moods and feelings; he is sensitive to the verge of the horizon: cut those trees, and he bleeds; mar those hills, and he suffers. How has the farmer planted himself in his fields; builded himself into his stone walls, and evoked the sympathy of the hills by his struggle! This home feeling, this domestication of nature, is important to the observer. This is the birdlime with which he catches the bird; this is the private door that admits him behind the scenes.

John Burroughs (1837 - 1921)

Contributed by: Zaady

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