speech

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on death, heart, speech, and thought

A thought Of that late death took all my heart for speech.

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: The Wild Swans at Coole 1919. In Memory of Major Robert Gregory, st. I

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by W. M. Ramsa on boldness, books, christianity, custom, direction, heart, language, needs, people, religion, speech, thought, and world

It has been too much the custom to regard the earliest Christian books as written in a specially Christian form of speech, standing apart and distinguishable from the common language of the eastern Roman provinces. Had that been the case, it is not too bold to say that the new religion could not have conquered the Empire. It was because Christianity appealed direct to the people, addressed them in their own language, and made itself comprehensible to them on their own plane of thought, that it met the needs and filled the heart of the Roman world.

W. M. Ramsa

Source: The Letters to the Seven Churches

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on men, speech, and thought

Men use thought only to justify their wrong doings, and employ speech only to conceal their thoughts. Ils ne se servent de la pensée que pour autoriser leurs injustices, et emploient les paroles que pour déguiser leurs pensées.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Source: Dialogue xiv. Le Chapon et la Poularde (1766).

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on birth, children, college, community, computers, contentment, control, family, government, home, information, internet, judgment, parenthood, speech, and thought

Under the [Communications Decency Act], a parent allowing her 17 year old to use the family computer to obtain information on the Internet that she, in her parental judgment, deems appropriate could face a lengthy prison term. . . . Similarly, a parent who sent his 17 year old college freshman information on birth control via e mail could be incarcerated even though neither he, his child, nor anyone in their home community, found the material "indecent" or "patently offensive," if the college town's community thought otherwise. The breadth of this content based restriction of speech imposes an especially heavy burden on the Government to explain why a less restrictive provision would not be as effective as the CDA. It has not done so.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997 Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on computers, endings, seriousness, speech, and value

The breadth of the [Communications Decency Act's] coverage is wholly unprecedented.... The scope of the CDA is not limited to commercial speech or commercial entities. Its open ended prohibitions embrace all nonprofit entities and individuals posting indecent messages or displaying them on their own computers in the presence of minors. The general, undefined terms "indecent" and "patently offensive" cover large amounts of nonpornographic material with serious educational or other value.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997 Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on clarity, contentment, facts, order, and speech

[The Communications Decency Act] lacks the precision that the First Amendment requires when a statute regulates the content of speech. In order to deny minors access to potentially harmful speech, the CDA effectively suppresses a large amount of speech that adults have a constitutional right to receive and to address to one another.... In evaluating the free speech rights of adults, we have made it perfectly clear that sexual expression which is indecent but not obscene is protected by the First Amendment. Where obscenity is not involved, we have consistently held that the fact that protected speech may be offensive to some does not justify its suppression.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997, Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al. [Interior quotes and citations omitted]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on books, certainty, exercise, government, internet, liberty, opportunity, speech, and world

The Government first contends that, even though the [Communications Decency Act] effectively censors discourse on many of the Internet's modalities - such as chat groups, newsgroups, and mail exploders - it is nonetheless constitutional because it provides a "reasonable opportunity" for speakers to engage in the restricted speech on the World Wide Web.... The Government's position is equivalent to arguing that a statute could ban leaflets on certain subjects as long as individuals are free to publish books.... One is not to have the exercise of his liberty of expression in appropriate places abridged on the plea that it may be exercised in some other place.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997, Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al. [Interior quotes and citations omitted]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on communication, crime, ideas, silence, speech, and words

The vagueness of [the Communications Decency Act] raises special First Amendment concerns because of its obvious chilling effect on free speech. . . . The CDA is [also] a criminal statute. . . . The severity of criminal sanctions may well cause speakers to remain silent rather than communicate even arguably unlawful words, ideas, and images.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997, Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on agreement, community, internet, and speech

We agree with the District Court's conclusion that the [Communications Decency Act] places an unacceptably heavy burden on protected speech... In Sable [v. FCC] we remarked that the speech restriction at issue there amounted to "burning the house to roast the pig." The CDA, casting a far darker shadow over free speech, threatens to torch a large segment of the Internet community.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997, Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al. [Interior clarifications omitted]

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by U.S. Supreme Court on absence, censorship, contentment, democracy, freedom, ideas, interest, society, speech, and traditions

As a matter of constitutional tradition, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, we presume that governmental regulation of the content of speech is more likely to interfere with the free exchange of ideas than to encourage it. The interest in encouraging freedom of expression in a democratic society outweighs any theoretical but unproven benefit of censorship.

U.S. Supreme Court

Source: 1997, Janet Reno et al. v. ACLU et al.

Contributed by: Zaady

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