sorrow

A Quote by William Shakespeare on good and sorrow

JULIET Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on men, patience, sorrow, and virtue

No, no; 'tis all men's office to speak patience To those that wring under the load of sorrow, But no man's virtue nor sufficiency To be so moral when he shall endure The like himself. Therefore give me no counsel: My griefs cry louder than advertisement.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, Act 5, Scene 1

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on good and sorrow

Good-night, good-night! parting is such sweet sorrow That I shall say good-night till it be morrow.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene ii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, death, duty, earth, fatherhood, faults, grief, heart, heaven, impatience, losing, love, mind, nature, nobility, obligation, reason, simplicity, sons, sorrow, understanding, vulgarity, and world

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet, To give these mourning duties to your father: But, you must know, your father lost a father; That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound In filial obligation for some term To do obsequious sorrow: but to persever In obstinate condolement is a course Of impious stubbornness; 'tis unmanly grief; It shows a will most incorrect to heaven, A heart unfortified, a mind impatient, An understanding simple and unschool'd: For what we know must be and is as common As any the most vulgar thing to sense, Why should we in our peevish opposition Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature, To reason most absurd: whose common theme Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried, From the first corse till he that died to-day, 'This must be so.' We pray you, throw to earth This unprevailing woe, and think of us As of a father: for let the world take note, You are the most immediate to our throne; And with no less nobility of love Than that which dearest father bears his son, Do I impart toward you.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William M. Peck on acceptance, joy, laughter, life, people, sorrow, tears, time, tolerance, and truth

The acceptance of the truth that joy and sorrow, laughter and tears are not confined to any particular time, place or people, but are universally distributed, should make us more tolerant of and more interested in the lives of others.

William M. Peck

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Law on bitterness, custom, heart, kindness, learning, life, nature, religion, repentance, rules, sorrow, soul, and time

Repentance is but a kind of table-talk, till we see so much of the deformity of our inward nature as to be in some degree frightened and terrified at the sight of it. . . . A plausible form of an outward life, that has only learned rules and modes of religion by use and custom, often keeps the soul for some time at ease, though all its inward root and ground of sin has never been shaken or molested, though it has never tasted of the bitter waters of repentance and has only known the want of a Saviour by hearsay. But things cannot pass thus: sooner or later repentance must have a broken and a contrite heart; we must with our blessed Lord go over the brook Cedron, and with Him sweat great drops of sorrow before He can say for us, as He said for Himself: "It is finished."

William Law (1686 - 1761)

Source: Christian Regeneration

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William George Jordan on happiness, love, mystery, pain, sorrow, suffering, sympathy, and time

True happiness must have the tinge of sorrow outlived, the sense of pain softened by the mellowing years, the chastening of loss that in the wondrous mystery of time transmutes our suffering into love and sympathy with others.

William Jordan

Source: The Majesty of Calmness, p. 62

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Butler Yeats on change, gold, life, slavery, and sorrow

I see my life go drifting like a river From change to change; I have been many things -  A green drop in the surge, a gleam of light Upon a sword, a fir tree on a hill,  An old slave grinding at a heavy quern, A king sitting upon a chair of gold -  And all these things were wonderful and great; But now I have grown nothing, knowing all. Ah! Druid, Druid, how great webs of sorrow Lay hidden in that small slate-coloured thing!

William Butler Yeats (1865 - 1939)

Source: "Fergus and the Druid"

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Blake on consequences, good, happiness, and sorrow

Some say that happiness is not good for mortals, & they ought to be answered that sorrow is not fit for immortals & is utterly useless to any one; a blight never does good to a tree, & if a blight kill not a tree but it still bear fruit, let none say that the fruit was in consequence of the blight.

William Blake (1757 - 1827)

Source: Letter (7 October 1803)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Blake on grief, kindness, and sorrow

Can I see another's woe, And not be in sorrow too? Can I see another's grief, And not seek for kind relief?

William Blake (1757 - 1827)

Source: On Another’s Sorrow

Contributed by: Zaady

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