sons

A Quote by Dr. Samuel Johnson on daughters, god, men, sons, and words

Words are men's daughters, but God's sons are things.

Samuel Johnson (1709 - 1784)

Source: Boulter's Monument. (Supposed to have been inserted by Dr. Johnson, 1745.)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Clement of Alexandria on acceptance, age, beginning, belief, brothers, certainty, character, christ, church, cities, companions, cooperation, corruption, crime, death, departure, divinity, elderly, evil, familiarity, fatherhood, fear, fo

An apocryphal story from the writings of Clement of Alexandria regarding John the Apostle quoted by John H. Vandenberg, Conference Report, October 1963, p.45 - p.46: ". . . about John the Apostle, handed down and preserved in memory. When, on the death of the tyrant, he (John) passed over to Ephesus from the Island of Patmos, he used to make missionary journeys also to neighboring gentile cities, in some places to appoint bishops, and in some to set in order whole churches and . . . to appoint one of those indicated by the Spirit. On his arrival then at one of the cities at no great distance, of which some even mention the name, . . . he saw a youth of stalwart frame and winning countenance, and impetuous spirit, and said to the bishop, 'I entrust to thee this youth with all earnestness, calling Christ and the Church to witness.' The bishop accepted the trust, and made all the requisite promises, and the apostle renewed his injunction and adjuration. He then returned to Ephesus, and the elder taking home with him the youth who had been entrusted to his care, maintained, cherished, and finally baptized him. After this he abandoned further care and protection of him, considering that he had affixed to him the seal of the Lord as a perfect amulet against evil. Thus prematurely neglected, the youth was corrupted by certain idle companions of his own age, who were familiar with evil, and who first led him astray by many costly banquets, and then took him out by night with them to share in their felonious proceedings, finally demanding his cooperation in some worse crime. First familiarized with guilt, and then, from the force of his character, starting aside from the straight path like some mighty steed that seizes the bit between its teeth; he rushed towards headlong ruin, and utterly abandoning the divine salvation, gathered his worst comrades around him, and became a most violent, bloodstained, and reckless bandit-chief. Not long afterwards John was recalled to the city, and after putting other things in order said, 'Come now, O bishop, restore to me the deposit which I and the Saviour entrusted to thee, with the witness of the Church over which thou dost preside.' At first the bishop in his alarm mistook the meaning of the metaphor, but the apostle said, 'I demand back the young man and the soul of the brother.' Then groaning from the depth of his heart and shedding tears, 'He is dead,' said the bishop. 'How and by what death?' 'He is dead to God! For he has turned out wicked and desperate, and, to sum up all, a brigand; and now, instead of the Church he has seized the mountain, with followers like himself.' Then the apostle, rending his robe and beating his head, with loud wailing said, 'A fine guardian of our brother's soul did I leave! Give me a horse and a guide.' Instantly, . . . he rode away . . . from the Church and arriving at the brigands' outposts, was captured without flight or resistance, but crying, 'For this I have come. Lead me to your chief.' The chief awaited him in his armour, but when he recognized John as he approached, he was struck with shame and turned to fly [flight]. But John pursued him as fast as he could, forgetful of his age, crying out, 'Why my son, dost thou fly [flee] from thine own father, unarmed, aged as he is? Pity me, . . . fear not . . . stay! believe! Christ sent me.' But he on hearing these words first stood with downcast gaze, then flung away his arms, then trembling, began to weep bitterly, and embraced the old man when he came up to him, pleading with his groans, . . . but the apostle pledging himself . . . led him back to the Church and praying for him . . . and wrestling with him in earnest fastings . . . did not depart, as they say, till he restored him to the bosom of the Church."

Saint Clement of Alexandria (c.150 - c.220)

Source: St. Clement of Alexandria, Quis Divinitus Salv., chapter 42.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Augustine of Hippo on heaven, sons, and time

Thy word remaineth for ever, which word now appeareth unto us in the riddle of the clouds, and through the mirror of the heavens, not as it is: because that even we, though the well beloved of thy Son, yet it hath not yet appeared what we shall be. He looked through the lattice of our flesh and he spake us fair, yea, he set us on fire, and we hasten on his scent. But when he shall appear, then shall we be like him, for we shall see him as he is: as he is, Lord, will our sight be, though the time be not yet.

Saint Augustine of Hippo (354 - 430)

Source: The Confessions of St. Augustine

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Augustine of Hippo on beginning, day, fatherhood, god, good, humility, kindness, sons, spirituality, tears, and wealth

Picture God as saying to you, "My son, why is it that day by day you rise, and pray, and even strike the ground with your forehead, nay sometimes even shed tears, while you say to Me: 'My Father, give me wealth!' If I were to give it to you, you would think yourself of some importance, you would fancy that you had gained something very great. Because you asked for it, you have it. But take care to make good use of it. Before you had it, you were humble; now that you have begun to be rich, you despise the poor. What kind of a good is that which only makes you worse? For worse you are, since you were bad already. And that it would make you worse you knew not; hence you asked it of Me. I gave it to you, and I proved you; you have found - and you have found out! Ask of Me better things than these, greater things than these. Ask of Me spiritual things. Ask of Me Myself!"

Saint Augustine of Hippo (354 - 430)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Augustine of Hippo on earth, god, sons, and suffering

God had one Son on earth without sin, but never one without suffering.

Saint Augustine of Hippo (354 - 430)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rudyard Kipling on losing, sons, and world

If you can keep your wits about you while all others are losing theirs, and blaming you. . . . The world will be yours and everything in it, what's more, you'll be a man, my son.

Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)

Source: "If"

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rudyard Kipling on aim, disaster, doubt, dreams, earth, force, friendship, good, heart, justice, lies, life, losing, men, risk, sons, trust, truth, virtue, and worth

IF If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too: If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or being lied about, don't deal in lies, Or being hated don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise; If you can dream and not make dreams your master; If you can think - and not make thoughts your aim; If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster And treat those two impostors just the same;* If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken, And stoop and build 'em up with worn-out tools: If you can make one heap of all your winnings And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss, And lose, and start again at your beginnings And never breathe a word about your loss; If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew To serve your turn long after they are gone, And so hold on when there is nothing in you Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on!" If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue, Or walk with Kings - nor lose the common touch, If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you, If all men count with you, but none too much; If you can fill the unforgiving minute With sixty seconds' worth of distance run, Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it, And - which is more - You'll be a Man, my son! *These two lines are inscribed over the door to the center court at Wimbledon.

Rudyard Kipling (1865 - 1936)

Source: Rewards and Fairies, 1910, If

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Roger Ward Babson on cities, country, fatherhood, motherhood, religion, and sons

I have not been able to find a single useful institution which has not been founded either by an intensely religious man or by the son of a praying father or a praying mother. I have made the statement before the chambers of commerce of all the largest cities of the country and have asked them to bring forward a case that is an exception to this rule. Thus far, I have not heard of a single one.

Roger Babson (1875 - 1967)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robinson Jeffers on sons

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As for me, I would rather Be a worm in a wild apple than a son of man.

Robinson Jeffers (1887 - 1962)

Source: Original Sin, 1948

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Treat Paine, Jr. on earth, plants, slavery, and sons

And ne'er shall the sons of Columbia be slaves, While the earth bears a plant or the sea rolls its waves.

Robert Treat Paine (177 - 1811)

Source: Adams and Liberty.

Contributed by: Zaady

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