sons

A Quote by Pam Brown on wife, mother, sons, and family

For the sake of the sons - and even for the son's future wives - a woman must keep a part of her mind and heart entirely for herself.
Every family is better off with a wife and mother who can astonish and occasionally dewilder.

Pam Brown

Source: An Illustrated Woman's Notebook - Juliette Clarke

Contributed by: Taikunping

A Quote by Gloria Steinem on daughters, sons, courage, and women

"We've begun to raise daughters more like sons... but few have the courage to raise our sons more like our daughters. "

Gloria Steinem (1934 -)

Contributed by: Harmony

A Quote by Mevlana Jelalu'ddin Rumi on sons

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Know that a word suddenly shot from the tongue is like an arrow shot from the bow. Son, that arrow won't turn back on its way; you must damn the torrent at its source.

Mevlana Rumi (1207 - 1273)

Source: Rumi Daylight: A Daybook of Spiritual Guidance

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Yehuda L. Bialer on children, death, deed, disaster, eternity, generations, heart, holocaust, people, silence, sons, spirit, and tyranny

Son of man, keep not silent, forget not deeds of tyranny. Cry out at the disaster of a people, recount it unto your children and they unto theirs. From generation to generation the hordes swept in, ran wild and savage and there was no deliverance, valiance, and revolt. How the mighty are fallen, the great in spirit and stout of heart, walking to their death with a halo of eternity. (reference to the Holocaust)

Yehuda L. Bialer

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on madness, nobility, and sons

. . . your noble son is mad: Mad call I it; for, to define true madness, What is't but to be nothing else but mad? But let that go.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 2, scene 2. 1602

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on sons

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Macduff's Son to Murtherers: Thou li'st, thou shag-eared villian!

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Macbeth, Act 4, scene 2

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on journeys, lovers, meetings, and sons

Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son doth know.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Twelfth Night, Act II, Scene iii

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Shakespeare on day, death, duty, earth, fatherhood, faults, grief, heart, heaven, impatience, losing, love, mind, nature, nobility, obligation, reason, simplicity, sons, sorrow, understanding, vulgarity, and world

'Tis sweet and commendable in your nature, Hamlet, To give these mourning duties to your father: But, you must know, your father lost a father; That father lost, lost his, and the survivor bound In filial obligation for some term To do obsequious sorrow: but to persever In obstinate condolement is a course Of impious stubbornness; 'tis unmanly grief; It shows a will most incorrect to heaven, A heart unfortified, a mind impatient, An understanding simple and unschool'd: For what we know must be and is as common As any the most vulgar thing to sense, Why should we in our peevish opposition Take it to heart? Fie! 'tis a fault to heaven, A fault against the dead, a fault to nature, To reason most absurd: whose common theme Is death of fathers, and who still hath cried, From the first corse till he that died to-day, 'This must be so.' We pray you, throw to earth This unprevailing woe, and think of us As of a father: for let the world take note, You are the most immediate to our throne; And with no less nobility of love Than that which dearest father bears his son, Do I impart toward you.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Hamlet, Act 1, scene 2.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Edmondstoune Aytoun on belief, daughters, sons, and water

Fhairshon had a son, Who married Noah's daughter, And nearly spoiled to Flood, By trinking up ta water: Which he would have done, I at least believe it, Had the mixture peen Only half Glenlivet.

William Edmondstoune Aytoun (1813 - 1965)

Source: The Massacre of the Macpherson

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Dean on assumptions, baseball, brothers, christianity, complaints, difficulty, evil, facts, fatherhood, faults, integrity, justice, learning, life, meaning, nature, needs, reflection, sons, theology, trade, and words

Bernard Loomer's father was a sea captain. He was acquainted with his small place in an uncontrollable nature. In a talk in 1974 Loomer described his father's instructions about the uses of a baseball glove. The father had just overheard his son's sandlot complaints about the thinness of a glove inherited from his older brothers. When his father asked him what a baseball glove was for, young Loomer had said that it was to protect the hand. In the words of Bernard Loomer in his sixties, his father replied: Son, I never have played baseball, but it seems to me you ought to be able to catch the ball bare-handed. The way I look at it, you use a glove not to protect your hand, but to give you a bigger hand to help catch balls that are more difficult to reach. I assume that in this as in all walks of life there are tricks to the trade. I suggest you learn how to catch with that glove for two reasons. First, because you are not going to get another one, and second, because you don't need protection from life. You need a glove to give you a bigger hand to catch baseballs you might otherwise miss. As the decade of the 1970s progressed, Loomer reflected increasingly on the fact that what you might otherwise miss [in theology] was irrational, even evil, but [that it] must be caught anyway. Loomer grew increasingly dissatisfied with those who seemed to restrict their reach-even Whitehead was faulted. And increasingly it appeared that Christian theology was the theology Loomer had-that he was not going to get another one-and so, although it was thin in places, he attempted to use the one theology he had, to catch all he could. [This] suggests the meaning of Loomer's special term, "size." Size signifies "the volume of life you can take into your being and still maintain your integrity."

William Dean

Source: The Size of God, 1987

Contributed by: Zaady

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