songs

A Quote by Maxwell N. Cornelius on beginning, darkness, fear, god, guidance, heaven, hope, meaning, mystery, praise, songs, tears, trust, and understanding

Not now, but in the coming years, It may be in the better land, We'll read the meaning of our tears, And then, ah, then we'll understand. We'll catch the broken threads again And finish what we here began; Heaven will the mysteries explain, And then, ah, then we'll understand. We'll know why clouds instead of sun Were over many a cherished plan, Why song has ceased when scarce begun; 'Tis there sometime we'll understand. Why what we long for most of all Eludes so oft our eager hand, Why hopes are crushed and castles fall, Up there, sometime we'll understand. God knows the way; he holds the key; He guides us with unerring hand; Sometimes with tearless eyes we'll see, Yes, there, up there we'll understand. Then trust in God through all thy days; Fear not, for he cloth hold thy hand; Though dark thy way, still sing and praise, Sometime, sometime we'll understand.

Maxwell N. Cornelius

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mary Anne Radmacher-Hershey on beauty, darkness, and songs

Even from a dark night songs of beauty can be born.

Mary Anne Radmacher-Hershey

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Martin Luther on life, love, songs, wine, and women

Who loves not women, wine and song, Remains a fool his whole life long.

Martin Luther (1483 - 1546)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mari Evans on music, songs, tears, and women

I am a black woman the music of my song some sweet arpeggio of tears is written in a minor key and I can be heard humming in the night Can be heard humming in the night

Mari Evans (1923 -)

Source: Famous Black Quotations, ed. Janet Cheatham Bell, 1995.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Margaret Walker on body and songs

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I want my careless song to strike no minor key; no fiend to stand between my body's Southern song - the fusion of the South, my body's song and me.

Margaret Walker (1915 -)

Source: Southern Song

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on horses, mountains, songs, and wonder

Three Songs 1 Mountain. I whip my quick horse and don't dismount and look back in wonder. The sky is three feet away. 2 Mountain. The sea collapses and the river boils. Innumerable horses race insanely into the peak of battle. 3 Mountain. Peaks pierce the green sky, unblunted. The sky would fall but for the columns of mountains. 1934-35

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: The Poems of Mao Tse-tung, Harper & Row

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Mao Tse-tung on dance, dawn, family, musicians, play, poetry, poets, songs, and world

Poem for Liu Ya-tzu Night is long. And slowly comes the crimson sun-moon dawn. Demons and monsters danced about and whirled for hundreds of years and five hundred millions were not a family. Yet in one song the cock whitens the world. Song pours on us from ten thousand corners and musicians from Khotan play. Never before were we poets so moved. October 1950

Mao Tse-tung (1893 - 1976)

Source: The Poems of Mao Tse-tung, Harper & Row

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Maltbie Davenport Babcock on day, dreams, evil, gifts, god, play, shame, songs, struggle, and work

Be strong: we are not here to play, to dream, to drift, we have hard work to do and loads to lift, shun not the struggle, face it, 'tis god's gift. Be strong: say not the days are evil - who's to blame! And fold your hands and acquiesce - o shame! Stand up, speak out, and bravely in god's name. Be strong! It matters not how deep entrenched the wrong. How hard the battle goes, the day, how long! Faint not, fight on! Tomorrow comes the song.

Maltbie Davenport Babcock (1858 - 1901)

Source: The country sage, newspaper clipping, Albert W. Daw Collection.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Philip Dormer Stanhope, Lord Chesterfield on songs

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Unlike my subject now shall be my song; It shall be witty, and it shan't be long.

Lord Chesterfield Stanhope (1694 - 1773)

Source: Impromptu Lines.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by George Gordon, Lord Byron on songs

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Fools are my theme, let satire be my song.

Lord Byron (1788 - 1824)

Source: English Bards and Scotch Reviewers. Line 6.

Contributed by: Zaady

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