songs

A Quote by Samuel Francis Smith on authors, country, fatherhood, freedom, god, heart, liberty, love, mortality, music, nobility, pride, silence, and songs

My country, 'tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing: Land where my fathers died, Land of the pilgrims' pride, From every mountainside Let freedom ring. My native country, thee, Land of the noble free, Thy name I love; I love thy rocks and rills, Thy woods and templed hills. My heart with rapture thrills Like that above. Let music swell the breeze And ring from all the trees Sweet freedom's song; Let mortal tongues awake; Let all that breathe partake; Let rocks their silence break, The sound prolong. Our fathers' God, to thee, Author of liberty, To thee I sing; Long may our land be bright With freedom's holy light; Protect us by thy might, Great God, our King!

Samuel Francis Smith (1808 - 1895)

Source: America’s National Hymn.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Samuel Eliot Morison on achievement, america, architecture, balance, bravery, brevity, colors, dance, gold, harmony, music, nature, poets, purpose, songs, and world

These clipper ships of the early 1850's were built of wood in shipyards from Rockland in Maine to Baltimore. These architects, like poets who transmute nature's message into song, obeyed what wind and wave had taught them, to create the noblest of all sailing vessels, and the most beautiful creations of man in America. With no extraneous ornament except a figurehead, a bit of carving and a few lines of gold leaf, their one purpose of speed over the great ocean routes was achieved by perfect balance of spars and sails to the curving lines of the smooth black hull; and this harmony of mass, form and color was practiced to the music of dancing waves and of brave winds whistling in the rigging. These were our Gothic cathedrals, our Parthenon; but monuments carved from snow. For a few brief years they flashed their splendor around the world, then disappeared with the finality of the wild pigeon.

Samuel Eliot Morison (1887 - 1976)

Source: The Oxford History of the American People, 1965, ch. 36

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Gaius Sallustius Crispus Sallust on fate and songs

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But the case has proved that to be true which Appius says in his songs, that each man is the maker of his own fate.

Sallustius Crispus (86 - 34 BC)

Source: Ad Cæsarem

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Saint Anselm of Canterbury on anguish, beauty, children, compassion, death, despair, fear, forgiveness, goodness, grace, hatred, heaven, hope, jesus, joy, life, love, mercy, motherhood, people, preparation, pride, purity, songs, sorrow, and te

A Song of Anselm Jesus, as a mother you gather your people to you: you are gentle with us as a mother with her children; Often you weep over our sins and our pride: tenderly you draw us from hatred and judgement. You comfort us in sorrow and bind up our wounds: in sickness you nurse us, and with pure milk you feed us. Jesus, by your dying we are born to new life: by your anguish and labour we come forth in joy. Despair turns to hope through your sweet goodness: through your gentleness we find comfort in fear. Your warmth gives life to the dead: your touch makes sinners righteous. Lord Jesus, in your mercy heal us: in your love and tenderness remake us. In your compassion bring grace and forgiveness: for the beauty of heaven may your love prepare us.

Saint Anselm of Canterbury (c. 1033 - 1109)

Source: Preface to the Proslogion

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Russell Page on faith, garden, hope, life, praise, and songs

A garden really lives only insofar as it is an expression of faith, the embodiment of a hope and a song of praise.

Russell Page

Source: The Education of a Gardener, 1962

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Rosalind Fordham on belief, creation, culture, existence, harmony, music, prayer, songs, time, universe, words, and world

Somewhere there's music, how faint the tune.... Some tribal cultures believe that the act of creation takes place through music. They literally sing their homes, their villages and their valleys into existence. They keep them strong and real regularly and ritually through music and belief. It's a little like prayer, isn't it? Somewhere in the world, someone is chanting their own universe into being right now. We modern folk are not so different from this. We speak of being in tune, of needing harmony and rhythm to feel complete and alive. We create our own realities with our words and our songs, our eyes and our hands. Each world is defined by our own outline, the envelope of skin and nerves and light and air we inhabit. Every time we push against something, we feel ourselves.

Rosalind Fordham

Source: her Homepage

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Scheid on caring, creation, day, fulfillment, gifts, kiss, laws, love, opposites, relationships, songs, soul, and unity

Being with the right person is caring for another physically, mentally and spiritually. It is caring for another's soul. As the relationship grows deeper over the years each kiss is still as new and exciting as the first, each embrace is a song of ever-deepening love, and each night becomes a celebration of unity and fulfillment. Every day becomes richer and fuller. Being with the right person answers one of the deeper longings of the human soul. It represents the union of opposites, the fulfillment of the law of creation, and is a rare and precious gift from our Creator.

Robert Scheid

Source: Beyond the Love Game

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Lee Frost on learning and songs

Unless I'm wrong I but obey The urge of a song: I'm-bound-away! And I may return If dissatisfied With what I learn From having died.

Robert Frost

Source: Away!, 1962

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Burns on praise and songs

Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes; Flow gently, I 'll sing thee a song in thy praise.

Robert Burns (1759 - 1796)

Source: Flow gently, sweet Afton.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Robert Browning on songs

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That's the wise thrush; he sings each song twice over, Lest you should think he never could recapture The first fine careless rapture.

Robert Browning (1812 - 1889)

Source: Home-Thoughts from Abroad. ii.

Contributed by: Zaady

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