solitude

A Quote by Thomas Eugene (Tom) Robbins on privacy and solitude

Sometimes those things that attract the most attention to us are the things which afford us the greatest privacy

Tom Robbins (1936 -)

Source: Even Cowgirls Get the Blues, Pages: 213

Contributed by: HeyOK

A Quote by Archibald Rutledge on stars, solitude, meditation, yoga, peaceful, silent, silence, grace, you, me, us we, they, all, one, and we are

It takes solitude under the stars, for us to be reminded of our eternal origin and our far destiny.

Archibald Rutledge

Source: m.t.g Quotation Collatio Vol. I

Contributed by: Your Fantasy

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on genius, solitude, companionship, and self reliance

I appeal from your customs. I must be myself. I cannot break myself any
longer for you, or you. If you can love me for what I am, we shall be
the happier. If you cannot, I will still seek to deserve that you
should. I will not hide my tastes or aversions. I will so trust that
what is deep is holy, that I will do strongly before the sun and moon
whatever inly rejoices me, and the heart appoints. If you are noble, I
will love you; if you are not, I will not hurt you and myself by
hypocritical attentions. If you are true, but not in the same truth
with me, cleave to your companions; I will seek my own.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Source: Essays and Poems (Everyman's Library (Paper)), Pages: 54

Contributed by: Obi

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on genius, solitude, companionship, and self reliance

I appeal from your customs. I must be myself. I cannot break myself any longer for you, or you. If you can love me for what I am, we shall be the happier. If you cannot, I will still seek to deserve that you should. I will not hide my tastes or aversions. I will so trust that what is deep is holy, that I will do strongly before the sun and moon whatever inly rejoices me, and the heart appoints. If you are noble, I will love you; if you are not, I will not hurt you and myself by hypocritical attentions. If you are true, but not in the same truth with me, cleave to your companions; I will seek my own.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Obi

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on genius, solitude, companionship, and self reliance

I appeal from your customs. I must be myself. I cannot break myself any
longer for you, or you. If you can love me for what I am, we shall be
the happier. If you cannot, I will still seek to deserve that you
should. I will not hide my tastes or aversions. I will so trust that
what is deep is holy, that I will do strongly before the sun and moon
whatever inly rejoices me, and the heart appoints. If you are noble, I
will love you; if you are not, I will not hurt you and myself by
hypocritical attentions. If you are true, but not in the same truth
with me, cleave to your companions; I will seek my own.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Contributed by: Obi

A Quote by Sakyong Mipham on virtue, solitude, and chogyam trungpa rinpoche

When I was going into one of my first meditation retreats, I asked my father, Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, for some advice. He said, "How you act when you're alone affects the rest of your life." Even in solitude, the ruler engages in virtue.

Sakyong Mipham

Source: Ruling Your World : Ancient Strategies For Modern Life, Pages: 16

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson on independence, solitude, and world

It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinion; it is easy in solitude to live after our own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude.

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803 - 1882)

Source: The Selected Writings of Ralph Waldo Emerson (Modern Library)

Contributed by: Brian

A Quote by William Wordsworth on bliss and solitude

That inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: I wandered lonely.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William Wordsworth on bliss, company, dance, heart, lies, loneliness, pleasure, poets, solitude, thought, and wealth

I wander'd lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the Milky Way, They stretch'd in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay; Ten thousand saw I at a glance, Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee: A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company: I gazed-and gazed-but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought: For oft, when on my couch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which is the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills; And dances with the daffodils.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by William S. Ogdon on art, birds, character, clarity, conscience, contentment, control, determination, discovery, economics, effort, enemies, ethics, fashion, goodness, government, happiness, heart, individuality, life, listening, luxury, money,

The Art of Happiness There was never a time when so much official effort was being expended to produce happiness, and probably never a time when so little attention was paid by the individual to creating and personal qualities that make for it. What one misses most today is the evidence of widespread personal determination to develop a character that will, in itself, given any reasonable odds, make for happiness. Our whole emphasis is on the reform of living conditions, of increased wages, of controls on the economic structure-the government approach-and so little on man improving himself. The ingredients of happiness are so simple that they can be counted on one hand. Happiness comes from within, and rests most securely on simple goodness and clear conscience. Religion may not be essential to it, but no one ins known to have gained it without a philosophy resting on ethical principles. Selfishness is its enemy; to make another happy is to be happy one's self. It is quiet, seldom found for long in crowds, most easily won in moments of solitude and reflection. It cannot be bought; indeed, money has very little to do with it. No one is happy unless he is reasonably well satisfied with himself, so that the quest for tranquility must of necessity begin with self-examination. We shall not often be content with what we discover in this scrutiny. There is much to do, and so little done. Upon this searching self-analysis, however, depends the discovery of those qualities that make each man unique, and whose development alone can bring satisfaction. Of all those who have tried, down the ages, to outline a program for happiness, few have succeeded so well as William Henry Channing, chaplain of the House of Representatives in the middle of the last century: "To live content with small means; so seek elegance rather than luxury, and refinement rather than fashion; to be worthy . . . to study hard, think quietly, talk gently, act frankly; to listen to the stars and birds, to babes and sages, with open heart; to bear all cheerfully, do all bravely, await occasions, hurry never; in a word to let the spiritual, unbidden and unconscious, grow up through the common." It will be noted that no government can do this for you; you must do it for yourself.

William S. Ogdon

Source: New York Times, Editorial Page, Dec. 30, 1945

Contributed by: Zaady

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