slavery

A Quote by Ulysses S. Grant on belief, fighting, indifference, sharing, slavery, time, value, world, and worth

The issue of slavery provoked little moral indignation in General Grant, and in the first days following the attack on Fort Sumter, he seems to have believed that the North shared his indifference to abolition: "In all this I can but see the doom of Slavery. The North do not want, nor will they want, to interfere with the institution. But they will refuse for all time to give it protection unless the South shall return soon to their allegiance, and then too this disturbance will give such an impetus to the production of their staple, cotton, in other parts of the world that they can never recover the controll of the market again for that comodity. This will reduce the value of negroes so much that they will never be worth fighting over again."

Ulysses S. Grant (1822 - 1885)

Source: Letter to Frederick Dent, April 19, 1861

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Paine on army, conflict, country, crisis, earth, freedom, god, heaven, hell, love, men, patriotism, power, service, slavery, soldiers, soul, tyranny, value, and women

These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of his country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we may obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: 't is dearness only that gives everything its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods. It would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as Freedom should not be highly rated. Britain, with an army to enforce her tyranny, has declared that she has a right (not only to tax) but "to bind us in all cases whatsoever," and if being bound in that manner, is not slavery, then is there not such a thing as slavery upon earth. Even the expression is impious, for so unlimited a power can belong only to God.

Thomas Paine (1737 - 1809)

Source: The American Crisis, no. 1, December 23, 1776

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Moore on freedom and slavery

Where bastard Freedom waves The fustian flag in mockery over slaves.

Thomas Moore (1779 - 1852)

Source: To the Lord Viscount Forbes, written from the City of Washington.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas Chatterton on death, pride, and slavery

It is my PRIDE, my damn'd, native, unconquerable Pride, that plunges me into Distraction. You must know that 19/20th of my Composition is Pride. I must either live a Slave, a Servant; to have no Will of my own, no Sentiments of my own which I may freely declare as such; - or DIE - perplexing alternative!

Thomas Chatterton (1752 - 1770)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Stephen L. Richards on achievement, alienation, authors, certainty, constitution, daughters, divinity, eternity, exercise, fatherhood, fighting, gifts, god, good, history, independence, laws, liberty, men, nobility, principles, slavery, sons,

I have read and heard a good many statements by eminent writers and speakers to the effect that our liberty of which we are justly proud is an achievement, and not a gift. In the sense that it had to be worked for, fought for, and preserved with vigilance these statements are true. But let it never be forgotten that our concept of liberty is a gift. No human is the author of that concept. Many great men have so recognized it as did Thomas Jefferson when he wrote the Declaration of Independence and declared that "men are endowed with certain inalienable rights." Why are these rights inalienable? Because men did not create the right to liberty! In the exercise of his free agency he may surrender his privileges, and his property, and he may become the slave of others or of the state, but his free agency is as native to him as the air he breathes. It is part and parcel of his eternal constitution, and Jefferson was "righter than I think he himself knew" when he declared it an endowment which cannot be alienated. The message which we bear affirms that God is the Author of our inalienable liberty; that men, all men are of noble lineage, sons and daughters of the Eternal Father; and that liberty is their birthright. I thank God that . . . noble men were blessed with this lofty concept of man's inherent right to liberty and that they were prompted to incorporate these divine principles in the organic law and history of our favored land.

Stephen L. Richards (1879 - 1959)

Source: Ensign, November 1947.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Richard Francis Burton on art and slavery

Conquer thyself, till thou has done this, thou art but a slave; for it is almost as well to be subjected to another's appetite as to thine own.

Sir Richard Burton (1821 - 1890)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Anthony Eden on environment, freedom, and slavery

Man should be master of his environment, not its slave. That is what freedom means.

Sir Anthony Eden (1897 - 1977)

Source: Speech, Conservative Conference, Oct 1946.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Simone de Beauvoir on humanity, hypocrisy, and slavery

When we abolish the slavery of half of humanity, together with the whole system of hypocrisy it implies, then the "division" of humanity will reveal its genuine significance and the human couple will find its true form.

Simone de Beauvoir (1908 - 1986)

Source: The Second Sex (1950)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sidney Howard on books, civilization, dreams, slavery, and world

There was a land of Cavaliers and Cotton Fields called the Old South. Here in this pretty world, Gallantry took its last bow. Here was the last ever to be seen of Knights and their Ladies Fair, of Master and of Slave. Look for it only in books, for it is no more than a dream remembered, a Civilization gone with the wind. . . .

Sidney Howard

Source: Gone With The Wind, 1939 — based on Margaret Mitchell's novel

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Lucius Annaeus Seneca on fortune and slavery

A great fortune is a great slavery.

Seneca (4 BC - 65 AD)

Contributed by: Zaady

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