slavery

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on assumptions, existence, independence, labor, slavery, superiority, and work

It is assumed that labor is available only in connection with capital; that nobody labors unless somebody else, owning capital, somehow by the use of it, induces him to labor. This assumed, it is next considered whether it is best that capital shall hire laborers, and thus induce them to work by their consent. Having proceeded so far, it is naturally concluded that all laborers are either hired laborers or what we call slaves. Now, there is no such relation between capital and labor as here assumed . . . . Labor is prior to and independent of capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor and could never have existed if labor had not first existed. Labor is the superior of capital, and deserves much the higher consideration. Capital has its rights, which are as worthy of protection as any other rights

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: first annual message to Congress, December 3, 1861

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on belief, government, and slavery

A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure permanently half-slave and half-free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved - I do not expect the house to fall - but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing or all the other.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Lincoln's 'House-Divided' Speech in Springfield, Illinois, June 16, 1858.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on america, belief, cities, conversation, elections, freedom, god, injustice, prayer, presidency, privacy, slavery, speech, words, and work

I know there is a God, and that He hates injustice and slavery. I see the storm coming, and I know that His hand is in it. If he has a place and work for me - and I think He has - I believe I am ready. This comment was made in a private conversation with Newton Bateman, superintendent of public instruction for the state of Illinois, a few days before the election of 1860. During the election of 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy used the same words in a speech to the United Steelworkers of America convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, September 19, 1960. - Freedom of Communications, final report of the Committee on Commerce, United States Senate, part 1, p. 286 (1961). Senate Report. 87-994. As president, he used a variation of these words at the 10th annual presidential prayer breakfast, March 1, 1962. - Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States: John F Kennedy, 1962, p. 176.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Attributed in. — Joseph Gilbert Holland, The Life of Abraham Lincoln,1886, Unverified.

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on belief, government, and slavery

I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Speech, June 16, 1858.

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on earth, failure, freedom, generosity, giving, god, honor, hope, justice, peace, slavery, success, and world

In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free - honorable alike in what we give, and what we preserve. We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best hope of earth. Other means may succeed; this could not fail. The way is plain, peaceful, generous, just - a way which, if followed, the world will forever applaud, and God must forever bless.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Second Annual Message to Congress, Dec. 1, 1862.

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on freedom, god, justice, slavery, and world

This is a world of compensation; and he who would be no slave must consent to have no slave. Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves; and, under a just God, can not long retain it.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Letter To Henry L. Pierce and Others, April 6, 1859

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A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on citizenship, country, difficulty, earth, freedom, generations, giving, history, honor, hope, past, power, quiet, responsibility, slavery, present, and world

The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew and act anew. We must disenthrall ourselves, and then we shall save our country. Fellow-citizens, we cannot escape history. No personal significance or insignificance can spare one or another of us. The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down in honor or dishonor to the latest generation. We say we are for the Union. The world will not forget that we say this. We, even we here, hold the power and bear the responsibility. In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free - honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last best hope of earth.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: Address to the Congress of the United States, Dec. 1, 1862

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Abraham Lincoln on democracy, ideas, and slavery

As I would not be a slave, so I would not be a master. This expresses my idea of democracy. Whatever differs from this, to the extent of the difference, is no democracy.

Abraham Lincoln (1809 - 1865)

Source: The Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln edited by Roy P. Basler, Volume II, August 1, 1858,

Contributed by: Zaady

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