Silence

A Quote by Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill on silence

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When the eagles are silent the parrots begin to jabber.

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965)

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on death, destruction, memory, silence, and soul

And when the stream Which overflowed the soul was passed away, A consciousness remained that it had left Deposited upon the silent shore Of memory images and precious thoughts That shall not die, and cannot be destroyed.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book vii.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on heaven and silence

Spires whose "silent finger points to heaven."

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book vi.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on silence

in

The silence that is in the starry sky.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Song at the Feast of Broughton Castle.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on mind, silence, and thought

O Reader! had you in your mind Such stores as silent thought can bring, O gentle Reader! you would find A tale in everything.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: Simon Lee.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on mind, silence, and thought

Where the statue stood Of Newton, with his prism and silent face, The marble index of a mind forever Voyaging through strange seas of thought alone.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Prelude. Book iii.

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A Quote by William Wordsworth on children, curiosity, doubt, faith, heart, peace, power, silence, soul, and universe

I have seen A curious child, who dwelt upon a tract Of inland ground, applying to his ear The convolutions of a smooth-lipped shell; To which, in silence hushed, his very soul listened intensely; for from within were heard Murmurings whereby the monitor expressed Mysterious union with its native sea. Even such a shell the universe itself Is to the ear of faith; and there are times, I doubt not, when to you it doth impart Authentic tidings of invisible things, Of ebb and flow, and ever enduring power, And central peace, subsisting at the heart Of endless Agitation.

William Wordsworth (1770 - 1850)

Source: The Excursion. Book iv.

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A Quote by William Shakespeare on ambition, belief, country, death, fortune, friendship, honor, joy, judgment, life, love, lovers, men, patience, respect, rudeness, senses, silence, slavery, tears, and wisdom

BRUTUS: Be patient till the last. Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear: believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe: censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his. If then that friend demand why Brutus rose against Caesar, this is my answer: - Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Caesar were living and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead, to live all free men? As Caesar loved me, I weep for him; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it; as he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambition. Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so vile that will not love his country? If any, speak; for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Julius Cæsar, Act 3, scene 2.

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A Quote by William Shakespeare on age, aim, ambition, angels, corruption, country, enemies, envy, fear, god, heaven, honesty, hope, integrity, justice, love, peace, silence, truth, and zeal

Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away ambition: By that sin fell the angels; how can man, then, The image of his Maker, hope to win by it? Love thyself last: cherish those hearts that hate thee; Corruption wins not more than honesty. Still in thy right hand carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not: Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's; then if thou fall'st, O Cromwell, Thou fall'st a blessed martyr! Serve the king; And,-prithee, lead me in: There take an inventory of all I have, To the last penny; 'tis the king's: my robe, And my integrity to heaven, is all I dare now call mine own. O Cromwell, Cromwell! Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my king, he would not in mine age Have left me naked to mine enemies.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: King Henry VIII, Cardinal Wolsey in Act 3, scene 2.

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A Quote by William Shakespeare on death, friendship, love, past, silence, thought, and time

When to the sessions of sweet silent thought I summon up remembrance of things past, I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought, And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste: Then can I drown an eye, unused to flow, For precious friends hid in death's dateless night, And weep afresh love's long since cancell'd woe, And moan the expense of many a vanish'd sight: Then can I grieve at grievances foregone, And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan, Which I new pay as if not paid before. But if the while I think on thee, dear friend, All losses are restored and sorrows end.

William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616)

Source: Sonnet XXX

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