sentimentality

A Quote by Kenneth Smith on philosophy, consciousness, determination, criticism, sentimentality, ego, insight, truth, subjectivity, objectivity, and life

Not the least of the problems in clarifying one's consciousness is developing the stoic determination to criticize one's own softness or sentimentality toward oneself. Ego, self-solicitous about its own tenderness, is the ultimate policeman over its own false consciousness, dementedly uprooting every healthy seedling of insight into the truth. As Kierkegaard remarked, most people are subjective toward themselves and objective toward all others, but the real trick and task of life is to learn to be just the very opposite.

Kenneth Smith

Contributed by: Dave

A Quote by William Ellery Channing on country, freedom, peace, sentimentality, speech, and war

The cry has been that when war is declared, all opposition should therefore be hushed. A sentiment more unworthy of a free country could hardly be propagated. If the doctrine be admitted, rulers have only to declare war and they are screened at once from scrutiny. . . . In war, then, as in peace, assert the freedom of speech and of the press. Cling to this as the bulwark of all our rights and privileges.

William Ellery Channing (1780 - 1842)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Admiral William D. Leahy on adoption, atoms, certainty, children, conventionality, darkness, defeat, enemies, ethics, fashion, feeling, future, peace, possessions, possibility, potential, practicality, presidency, sentimentality, success, time

Those who dismiss "revisionist" qualms about the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as indulgences in peace-time sentimentality must count President Truman's own Chief of Staff among the bleeding hearts: "It is my opinion that the use of this barbarous weapon at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was of no material assistance in our war against Japan. The Japanese were already defeated and ready to surrender because of the effective sea blockade and the successful bombing with conventional weapons. . . . The lethal possibilities of atomic warfare in the future are frightening. My own feeling was that in being the first to use it, we had adopted an ethical standard common to the barbarians of the Dark Ages. I was not taught to make war in that fashion , and wars cannot be won by destroying women and children. We were the first to have this weapon in our possession, and the first to use it. There is a practical certainty that potential enemies will have it in the future and that atomic bombs will some time be used against us."

William D. Leahy

Source: I Was There, 1950

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Walter Savage Landor on friendship, gratitude, heart, misery, mortality, sacred, and sentimentality

In the hours of distress and misery, the eyes of every mortal turn to friendship; in the hours of gladness and conviviality, what is our want? It is friendship. When the heart overflows with gratitude, or with any other sweet or sacred sentiment, what is the word to which it would give utterance? A friend.

Walter Savage Landor (1775 - 1864)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by François Marie Arouet Voltaire on independence, justice, laws, mankind, religion, and sentimentality

The sentiment of justice is so natural, and so universally acquired by all mankind, that it seems to be independent of all law, all party, all religion.

Voltaire (1694 - 1778)

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on heart and sentimentality

Sentimentality is no indication of a warm heart. Nothing weeps more copiously than a chunk of ice.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by unknown on life, nature, secrets, sentimentality, thought, and understanding

There can be no secret in life and morals because nature has provided that every beautiful thought you know and every precious sentiment you feel shall shine out of your face, so that all that are great enough may see, know and understand.

unknown

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Thomas B. Reed on humanity, police, sentimentality, and present

There is, and always has been, one tremendous ruler of the human race - and that ruler is that combination of the opinions of all, the leveling up of universal sense which is called public sentiment. That is the ever-present regulator and police of humanity.

Thomas B. Reed

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Theodore Roosevelt on america, civilization, community, conflict, conquest, day, debt, humanity, idleness, impatience, interest, judgment, mankind, morality, nations, needs, rudeness, rules, sentimentality, stability, success, war, and world

Theodore Roosevelt, impatient with the excesses of "purely sentimental historians," authored his own stirring vindication of America's relations with the Indians: Looked at from the standpoint of the ultimate result, there was little real difference to the Indian whether the land was taken by treaty or by war. . . . No treaty could be satisfactory to the whites, no treaty served the needs of humanity and civilization, unless it gave the land to the Americans as unreservedly as any successful war. Whether the whites won the land by treaty, by armed conflict, or, as was actually the case, by a mixture of both, mattered comparatively little so long as the land was won. It was all-important that it should be won, for the benefit of civilization and in the interests of mankind. It is, indeed, a warped, perverse, and silly morality which would forbid a course of conquest that has turned whole continents into the seats of mighty and flourishing civilized nations. . . . It is as idle to apply to savages the rules of international morality which obtain between stable and cultured communities, as it would be to judge the fifth-century English conquest of Britain by the standards of to-day. The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. . . . It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.

Theodore Roosevelt (1858 - 1919)

Source: The Winning of the West: Book IV, 1896

Contributed by: Zaady

A Quote by Sir Thomas More on compassion, nature, and sentimentality

The Utopians feel that slaughtering our fellow creatures gradually destroys the sense of compassion, which is the finest sentiment of which our human nature is capable.

Sir Thomas More (1478 - 1535)

Source: Utopia, 1516

Contributed by: Zaady

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